U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Arizona > Phoenix area
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 08-23-2008, 07:28 PM
 
1,292 posts, read 2,923,370 times
Reputation: 1407

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by ArizonaBear View Post
KRIZ AM

I was amazed I could even find a link!
Wow! Thanks for posting that!

My best memory of that night is the DJ saying "Here's something I've always wanted to do..." and cueing a Lou Grubb ad with that sacharine muzak that always began his ads. As Lou began speaking the DJ dragged the needle across the 45 of the radio spot, scratching it horribly and loudly. I think a lot of Phoenix DJs secretly wanted to do that...
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-23-2008, 11:27 PM
 
65 posts, read 145,574 times
Reputation: 50
My parents home was near 12th Street and Highland. I remember we used to leave our doors open at night (with just screen doors,) and if we went to bed with the cooler on, someone would get up during the night and turn it off because it was so cold. Early mornings were just wonderful. Nights just didn't retain the heat like they do now.
Ah yes, Yellow Front. Best place to buy jeans. And Fed Mart. Where we bought most of our early marriage household stuff. (Still have and use some of it too!)
My first date with my wife of 44 years was at Kelly's next to the Palms Theater. We used to go see Wayland Jennings at some bar in the river bottom between Scottsdale and Tempe. We later moved near Christown where Mr. Chris could still be seen out riding his tractor, farming the remaining land. And I'd get time off at my job to go to the Rodeo parade, and everyone at my wife's bank (Valley National) would dress western during Rodeo week.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-24-2008, 12:33 AM
 
65 posts, read 145,574 times
Reputation: 50
Oh Yeah - Blakely Gas Stations. They gave away glasses with cactus on them. My mother finally told my Dad and me to stop bringing any more of those @#$% glasses home. She didn't want any more. So I just saved the coupons and when I got married I had a huge pile of coupons and we drove all over Phoenix redeeming those coupons for glasses! We wanted the clear ones with etched cacti and they were stopping the program is why we had a hard time finding them then. They became collectible later. Don't know if they still are since most collectible stuff seems to have died out.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-24-2008, 11:34 PM
 
1,292 posts, read 2,923,370 times
Reputation: 1407
[SIZE=2]So many good shared memories on this thread. I was born (1958) and raised in Phoenix. I'll add some more random memories, some already mentioned, some not:[/SIZE]
[SIZE=2] [/SIZE]
[SIZE=2]Where 32nd Street used to end, there was the foundation of a fire-destroyed home we called "Shiprock" due to its resemblance to a ship. It was a short hike from the road and a common site for keg parties in the desert, as shown by the collection of.. unusual...graffiti that covered it. Eventually I learned it was the remains of a Frank Lloyd Wright design (actually titled the Pauson House) that was destroyed when they extended 32nd Street up to Lincoln. You can still see the preserved chimnney just south of the original site, at the entrance to the Alta Vista Park Estates at 32nd Street and San Miguel.[/SIZE]
[SIZE=2] [/SIZE]
[SIZE=2]Yellowfront was kind of the ur-Arizona store. Work clothes that were designed with big people in mind - a size Medium shirt you bought there would fit like an Extra-Large anywhere else. Military surplus bins (with their mysterious wet canvas smell), where a kid could buy old military insigna patches or ancient cans of c-ration canned jam for a nickel. Hunting supplies. Summer pool supplies. I used to go to the one in the shopping plaza on 32nd Street and McDowell, but they were all over town.[/SIZE]
[SIZE=2] [/SIZE]
[SIZE=2]The Phoenix Metro Ballpark. It's still there and is the Oakland A's training camp during the Cactus League games, but when I was a kid it was the only large ballpark in the Valley, with creaky wooden seats and a chance to catch a foul or homer. I remember getting Hank Aaron to sign a ball for me there.[/SIZE]
[SIZE=2] [/SIZE]
[SIZE=2]Indian Trail, a dirt road bordering the canal where it cut across 32nd Street just south of McDowell. Ancient old trees bordered it on the canal side, and it was a very dark, spooky place to walk at night. Especially as we told each other stories about the bodies that had supposedly been found dumped in the canal by the crazy old murderer who lived nearby... Those evening walks usually ended in a headlong dash for the safety of the street lights on 32nd Street.[/SIZE]
[SIZE=2] [/SIZE]
[SIZE=2]Red Devil Pizza! Still there![/SIZE]
[SIZE=2] [/SIZE]
[SIZE=2]Reg Manning's Saturday morning football cartoons: There was a time when there were fewer high schools in town, and the rivalries were much more intense. After the Friday night high school football games, Arizona Republic cartoonist Reg Manning (famous for his cartoon history book about Arizona and his "What Kinda Cactus Izzat" intro to Arizona flora) drew a panel that took up the top half of the front page of the sports section in the Republic showing the scores for each high school game - depicted as the team's mascots slugging it out. So you would see Louie the Longhorn (East High) punching out an anthropomorphized Rocket (Moon Valley). We really looked forward to seeing those cartoons and pasted them up when our team won. I miss Reg Manning, Steve Benson couldn't carry his pencil case.[/SIZE,
[SIZE=2][/SIZE]

Last edited by Arizona Mike; 08-24-2008 at 11:46 PM..
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-24-2008, 11:36 PM
 
1,292 posts, read 2,923,370 times
Reputation: 1407
[SIZE=2]Thomas Mall was my main mall to hang out in, on 44th Street and Thomas. It had some unusual features - a huge bird cage in the center of the mall, right next to a "Bazaar" of smaller shops, including a Karamel Korn shop whose smell would instantly start you salivating, a rock shop where you could buy little chunks of obsidian or iron pyrites for a nickel or so; a really sweet novely/fun shop where the nickel epoxied to the counter always fooled me; Marc Hopkins, a shop that had a little bit of everything - cuckoo clocks, telescopes, microscopes, sea monkey sets, science equipment, even racks of the often hard-to-find Classics Illustrated comic books; and a mysterious, dark cocktail lounge at the back of the Bazaar with a mounted sailfish on the back wall. Further afield in the mall, there were the cornerstone stores of Montgomery Wards and Diamonds (later Dillards) Department store; with a small attached tea shop that always seemed impossibly fancy to me. There were big tanks of exotic fish (including piranha, which always fascinated me with the possibility of their escape), low ornamental pools with strange modern art sculptures sticking out of them, and the B. Dalton's bookstore where I spent many happy hours browsing. And the Thomas Mall Cinema, part of the Plitt Theater chain, where I worked as an usher in high school. There was a Hanny's clothing store there, as well as one downtown (whose facade still remains - it is being converted into a restaurant with the same name.)
And the Brothers Hofbrau Deli, with its famously cranky staff and amazing round honey crisps and succulent, kraut-drenched hot dogs. Near the bird cage was McCrory's Department store, with the attached luncheon stand, newstand and smoke shop, and a pet shop full of puppies and fish tanks in back. Also a really sweet toy section. In today's world of mammoth WalMart and Super KMart powerstores that seem to offer everything, it's worth remembering how much varied stuff those small department stores could carry.

There was another McCrory's on 20th Street and McDowell (currently a Food City) that we also frequented, full of unique toys - little boxed plastic reptiles and amphibians you could get for a dime, plastic birds with real feathers glued all over them, and the weird seasonal items that showed up at certain times of the year in Valley stores - tubs of painted turtles from Mexico, and the maraca-like rattling of the little plastic boxes of Mexican jumping beans in their stand-up cardboard display boxes.

Korrick's downtown, as well as the Woolworth's. I remember going downstairs to the toy department in the basement on the escalator, and the soda fountain on the main floor where you you could examine the rotating paperback book rack.

Farrell's - this was such a great place to go, whether in Scottsdale, Tempe, or Metrocenter, and was the site of many after school or after game parties. I wonder why they closed down? I know they were in North Carolina too.

Mug's Root Beer, a couple of blocks east of 32nd Street on McDowell. Later becoming an A&W, this was an old-fashioned drive-up where a waitress came and hung a tray on your window, The root beer they served there, my God, maybe it's just my memory, but it was the best thing I've ever drunk. They served a Black Cow that was amazing. It also nearly got me killed, when I accidentally spilled one down my father's back on a hot day when he drove us there in his brand-new DeSoto, the first new car he had ever purchased.
[/SIZE]
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-24-2008, 11:37 PM
 
1,292 posts, read 2,923,370 times
Reputation: 1407
[SIZE=2]The old library on Central and McDowell. What a calm, relaxing place to be. It still shows up in my dreams to this day, maybe as a symbol of refuge.

The Ladmo Drive-in. How I begged to go there and get a burger and shake!

Another very cool website: Walt Lockley (http://www.waltlockley.com/phxobserved/phxobserved.htm - broken link) - Walt Lockey has compiled a fascinating website on Phoenix architecture, with wonderful quality photos. Lots of great info on those buildings you've seen all your life.

Someone already mentioned the Sears at Colonnades Mall on 20th and Camelback - We always seemed to go there at Christmas time, and I remember an amazing candy counter - those sugar candy fruit slices, jordan almonds, all sorts of candies by the pound. The smell was just amazing. Also a large pet store in there. And I met Vincent Price there, promoting the Sears / Vincent Price line of fine art to the masses (a short-lived experiment in selling fine art by upcoming artists through the Sears chain)!

The Celebrity Theater (originally the Star Theater) just south of Roosevelt on 32nd Street - an odd, neo-futuristic theater in the round that hosted some big names. We lived nearby, so as when we were kids we would hang around at the intermission and sneak in with the crowd, looking for empty seats. In such a fashion I saw Frank Gorshin, Marni Nixon, and Jack Benny perform - and later, the odd double bill of Seals and Croft with Kris Kristoferson. It's still there and still hosting shows.

Flagg's T-shirts in downtown Scottsdale - every teen I knew went there to get the latest t-shirt design in the 1970s. An essential stop for all your Bruce Lee t-shirt needs.

The Kersten Brothers shop - staff artists for the Wallace and Ladmo show, their shop had all kinds of cool things.

The A.J. Bayless Cracker Barrel Store and Museum on Indian School and 2nd Ave (currently the site of an art supply store) - this was an amazing museum operated by the Bayless grocery store chain that was lovingly christened "Arizona's Attic" - just an amazing amount of odd things people donated, with an antique soda fountain up front where you could have an old-fashioned sarsparilla. I remember going on a school field trip and watching them start up the Tesla Coil that threw sparks out a yard wide and lit up a fluorescent tube while you held it in your hand. A co-worker is the son of the curator, and he tells me all the items were donated to the Phoenix Historical Museum downtown, and most of them sit forgotten in its basement.
[/SIZE]
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-24-2008, 11:40 PM
 
1,292 posts, read 2,923,370 times
Reputation: 1407
[SIZE=2]Drive-Ins! The sheer number of drive-in movie theaters in the valley! They were everywhere, back when land was cheap and the summer evenings were still relatively cool, with those clear desert skies overhead. The Neon Cowboy of the Round-Up Drive-In! The Cinema Park Drive-In! And the far-flung Acres and Silver Dollar Drive-In, that my mother always thought were too far away to drive but which always advertised the best double (or triple!) bills of Japanese Godzilla movies, British Hammer horror flicks, or home-grown AIP monsterfests. The wonderful smells and tastes of those snack bars, with reheated mini-pizzas and popcorn and those frozen "squeezies"! And the Phoenix Drive-In nearest to my house, on 34th and Van Buren - I've never had a better movie experience than watching a double bill of "The Omega Man" and "Billy Jack" (with a Warner Brothers cartoon) while sitting on the hood of a cooling car with my grade school buddies. Only 2 drive-in multiplexes remain in the valley, one in Scottsdale, one in Glendale, Grab the kids or your old buddies and go to one while you can.

Lots of people have mentioned the MetroCenter ice rink, but Tower Plaza had its own, where the Phoenix Penguins ice hockey team played, long before the Coyotes were formed, It was near the movie theater, and on a hot summer day we always cut through the ice rink area to savor the blast of chill air. Channel 21 originally had its studios there, originally a Spanish-language station that you really had to jiggle the rabbit ears on your TV to receive. They programmed an eclectic blend of shows - roller derby, Mexican wrestling/horror movies, even some very racey films for the time (probably very tame by today's standards). It was later bought by a Christian broadcasting station before moving.

The original Cine Capri, where I also worked as an usher, tearing tickets through Logan's Run and most of the Phoenix run of Star Wars. If you went to see it in Phoenix, odds are I tore your ticket. Hello again, nice to run into you after all these years!

The Japanese Flower Gardens on Baseline - miles of beautiful, fragrant flower fields that fed the florist shops of the Valley. Before the I-10 ran through town, when your family drove to San Diego to beat the summer heat (a Zonie pilgramage then as now), you had to take surface streets and cut through Buckeye before you could get on the Interstate 8, and probably remember driving past these fields. There were roadside flower shops where you could buy a bunch of flowers for your girl and eliminate the middleman. Almost all gone now, I went to school with a daughter of one of the last families with their gardens there. Most of the next generation declined to work in agriculture and went on to the universities and the professions.

Gong's Food Mart on 32nd Street south of McDowell, full of very cool Japanese toys, (gone) and a store near to my house on 32nd and Roosevelt that went through numerous name changes - The Morning Star Market, Pak-A-Sak, V-A Market, etc - but which always had great selections of cheap candy, including brands that barely exist any more - pixie straws, Marathon Bars, Zero Bars, Abba-Zabba, Fizzies. Still there.

I remember the UTotem stores I frequented one near 24th St and Van Buren, and also one on Thomas near 36th street. The UTotems had better than average comic book selections compared to Circle K, as I recall.
[/SIZE]
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-24-2008, 11:41 PM
 
1,292 posts, read 2,923,370 times
Reputation: 1407
[SIZE=2]Al's Family Bookstore, on Van Buren near 12th Street - Phoenix's biggest used bookstore, and full of a huge variety of any category of book or magazine you can imagine - Used comic books for a dime, most of which would be worth a small fortune by now. Thousands of used paperbacks and magazines and paperbacks. A forbidden adults-only section in back, and a darkly mysterious occult section with a painted pentagram on the floor. My other favorite newstand was Royal Book Store on 32nd Street and Oak, which carried every magazine known to man, as well as a full selection of comic books and Famous Monsters of Filmland magazine to sate my childhood obsessions. Both sadly gone.

Tower Plaza had Wallich's Music City (later purchased by, I think, Yates' Army-Navy Surplus). Wallich's was a good-sized record store that was one of the last I can remember where you could take a sample of an LP into a booth and listen to it through headphones to see if you wanted to buy it, and sold music instruments as well as records (remember those?).

In the days before VHS (and long before DVDs) you had the revival movie theaters - The Sombrero Playhouse (long gone) and the Valley Art Theater on Mill (still there), where you could enjoy a string of double bills of cult films, classic films, "head" films, and the requisite midnight Rocky Horror shows. Bob Crane was performing in the Sombrero in its incarnation as a dinner theater when he was murdered.

I too, was fascinated by the Green Gables Restaurant (it's currently a florist shop, I think) and its knight and horse. Of all the people I know who remember the outside, I've never met anyone who actually ate there...
Anderson's Fifth Estate (gone) and Mr. Lucky's (still there, off Grand Avenue) for rock shows.

Bert Easley's Fun Shop, every Halloween and before your birthday party, if you were lucky. An essential stop for Halloween costumes, fake vomit, and for every boy magician. Still there, run by Bert's family and better than ever.
[/SIZE]
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-24-2008, 11:43 PM
 
1,292 posts, read 2,923,370 times
Reputation: 1407
[SIZE=2]There was a Tang's Market on 24th St and Indian School, where we sometimes bought groceries and whose Asian culinary items fascinated me; and Tang's Imports, a large Asian import store in Town and Country Mall (where the Trader Joe's is now) which was a great place to browse as a kid, full of the smell of sandalwood incense and bamboo. I always wondered: did the same Mr. Tang own both?

The weekend Swapmeet at Greyhound Park on Washington, full of bizarre secondhand items.

I managed to get on the Wallace and Ladmo show several times (my sister was dating one of the KPHO cameramen), and got toys off the cabinet and a couple of Ladmo bags. Arizona trivia: the sack lunches (which are pretty awful) given to inmates at Sheriff Joe's jail system are known colloquially as "Ladmo Bags". I wonder how many inmates have any idea what that means now?

I went to East High (gone, the site now an abandoned bottling plant) on 48th just north of Van Buren, and nearby were the stockyards near the Tovrea mansion. These were a quite extensive stockyard system feeding the nearby slaughterhouses. There were even small operations that sold bagged steer manure for your garden around the sluaghterhouses. Sometimes the wind shift could produce a pretty pungent aroma at school. The only remnant now is the Stockyards Restaurant. Phoenix even smelled different back then!

Legend City, of course. I got an apartment just around the corner on 52nd street (next to a seriously sleazy adult motel) and could open my windows at night and hear the sounds of bands from Compton Terrace, like The Cars. The lagoon that the Legend City amphitheater was built around is still next to SRP, by the way, shielded by a grove of trees. You can see it if you GoogleEarth the area. There is a GREAT website devoted to the park, by the way, at Legend City as well as a site devoted to Chris-Town: Joan De Arc Avenue

(Chris Town Mall was changed to Spectrum Mall, and recently changed back to "Chris-Town Spectrum Mall", by the way).

Tempe Beach was a very active municipal pool on Mill Avenue, opposite the old Hayden Flower Mill. The current park there is still named after it, although there is no pool, which must confuse some people.

For another FANTASTIC website devoted to old Phoenix photos, go to: Phoenix, Arizona vintage old photos, pictures, history, photographs, by Heberlee. Union High School and start poking around. You'll have a hard time leaving as you trip down memory lane. He even has old Phoenix restaurant menus on his site.

I remember going to the Palms Theater on Central quite often with my folks. I recently learned in a KAET special on Phoenix in the 1970s that the Palms was the first theater in Phoenix to end racial segregation of its audiences.

Weldon Riding Stables in Papago Park - incredibly tolerant horses you could ride through the trails.

Chess King in the 1970s at every mall, where you went to buy your polyester clothing.

Hobo Joe's coffee shop, with the statue out front of a carefree hobo.

After church every Sunday (St. Marks on 30th Street just north of Van Buren - it's still there but the attached parochial school I attended isn't), we went to breakfast at the Highway House coffee shop on the northwest corner of 32nd Street and Van Buren. There was a miniature railroad you could ride around the perimeter. It is currently a women's jail facility, I think, but the little tracks are still there. I sometime wonder what the current inhabitants think about them.

The International Food Bazaar at Town and Country Mall. There were a number of ethnic-themed take-away restaurants, as well as small gift and novelty shops. As a kid, I loved the Mediterranean restaurant, and thought the shish-kebob on rice with a glass of cherry phosphate on Thomas was the best meal on earth.

I learned to swim at Perry Pool near 32nd Street and Oak. We didn't have a swimming pool (too poor). I remember spending endless Summer afternoons in the 1960s at Perry Pool, lounging around in the highly chlorinated water before riding our bikes home or my sister or mom coming to pick me up. Then heading home to watch "Man from UNCLE", "Secret Agent", "Tarzan", or "Coronet Blue". Those days didn't seem like they'd ever end.
[/SIZE]
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-25-2008, 08:34 AM
 
Location: Mesa, Az
21,146 posts, read 38,783,688 times
Reputation: 3830
Some of the places that Arizona Mike listed I was actually familiar with (I was born in 1957) when I arrived here in 1990:

Family Bookstore I actually visited.
Chess King: we had them in the Wash DC area
I went to ChrisTown before it became Spectrum
U Totem: saw a few in San Diego(?) in 1980

As for neat 1950's-early 1970's neighborhoods: check out Modern Phoenix
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 

Quick Reply
Message:

Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Arizona > Phoenix area

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top