U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Arizona > Phoenix area
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-25-2018, 10:46 AM
 
141 posts, read 138,395 times
Reputation: 99

Advertisements

The tree had grown from 6ft to 20-25ft in past three years...constantly breaks large branches when the wind kicks up.

Now I’m left with awkward shapes that look even more likely to break as the weight is not even.

What do you long-term AZ’ers do? Cut it down and remove stump and find new tree? Cut it significantly down? What’s the choices here?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-25-2018, 11:08 AM
Status: "Comfortably numb" (set 24 days ago)
 
Location: Victory Mansions, Airstrip One
4,395 posts, read 2,712,871 times
Reputation: 5026
If it were me, I'd put in a different tree. Alternatively, you could have it trimmed frequently but that will be expensive over the long run.

Ash trees are kind of a happy medium, IMO. The grow relatively fast, are fairly strong, and give some nice shade when they are big.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-25-2018, 11:13 AM
 
Location: Inside the 101
2,554 posts, read 6,488,033 times
Reputation: 2659
Keep it pruned. I learned the hard way how a palo verde can become top heavy. We had one in the front yard that I let grow and grow. During one summer storm when there was a big gust, it came crashing down, causing some roof damage in the process. As I looked at the uprooted tree in yard, it became apparent that as big as a palo verde may grow on top, its root structure stays small.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-25-2018, 12:18 PM
 
Location: Sonoran Desert
33,960 posts, read 43,651,789 times
Reputation: 22970
You got to thin them - a lot. Look at them in the natural desert. They are scrawny trees more like bushes. With water they grow way too big and have weak limbs. Thinning them means less wind pressure on them. You can cut them down to nothing and they will grow back, so don't worry about overdoing it reshaping them. The same thing goes for mesquites. Another thing is to water them deep and for a long time each time (hours). Otherwise they end up with a small root ball and fall over in storms.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-25-2018, 12:51 PM
 
17,824 posts, read 38,670,081 times
Reputation: 10476
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ponderosa View Post
You got to thin them - a lot. Look at them in the natural desert. They are scrawny trees more like bushes. With water they grow way too big and have weak limbs. Thinning them means less wind pressure on them. You can cut them down to nothing and they will grow back, so don't worry about overdoing it reshaping them. The same thing goes for mesquites. Another thing is to water them deep and for a long time each time (hours). Otherwise they end up with a small root ball and fall over in storms.

This. Some of the mesquites I've seen that have access to way more water than they would have in nature have to be thinned regularly, as they get much larger than they would in the desert. Palo Verdes are the same.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-25-2018, 01:06 PM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ area
3,338 posts, read 3,867,862 times
Reputation: 4112
Quote:
Originally Posted by exit2lef View Post
Keep it pruned. I learned the hard way how a palo verde can become top heavy. We had one in the front yard that I let grow and grow. During one summer storm when there was a big gust, it came crashing down, causing some roof damage in the process. As I looked at the uprooted tree in yard, it became apparent that as big as a palo verde may grow on top, its root structure stays small.
That is mostly because of where people leave their drip lines. Most landscapers place the lines within a foot of the trunk and they never get moved after that. The lines need to be kept at the edge of the canopy and moved out every year so the root structure expans outward chasing the water.

Really on Palo Verde and Mesquite trees there shouldn't be a drip line. They are native trees that don't need the extra water so providing it will cause problems on its own. I've got a Palo Verde in my back yard that I cut water off of the day I moved in, new construction the builder did the landscaping. It has had no problems even with as dry as last year was.

Another problem I see a lot of is people don't take the stakes off of trees soon enough. Trees need to move with the wind to strengthen up and stakes prohibit that movement. Timing is different for all trees but most Palo Verde and Mesquite trees planted in a 24" box you should remove the stakes 6-12 months after planting preferably in the winter/spring, don't want their first experience without support during monsoon season.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-25-2018, 03:21 PM
 
141 posts, read 138,395 times
Reputation: 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ponderosa View Post
You got to thin them - a lot. Look at them in the natural desert. They are scrawny trees more like bushes. With water they grow way too big and have weak limbs. Thinning them means less wind pressure on them. You can cut them down to nothing and they will grow back, so don't worry about overdoing it reshaping them. The same thing goes for mesquites. Another thing is to water them deep and for a long time each time (hours). Otherwise they end up with a small root ball and fall over in storms.
Maybe I should just cut them down low and let it regrow then? Would it look drastically out of proportion as it regrows?

Also any “ballpark” cost estimates I should expect to have a crew come and cut down significantly? Never paid for yard work, but this one may not be worth the time and hauling away...what should I expect to pay?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-25-2018, 03:54 PM
 
Location: Chandler, AZ
3,425 posts, read 3,330,130 times
Reputation: 4826
$400-$500 to have it properly trimmed. Ours is huge and we are considering removing it completely.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-25-2018, 05:01 PM
Status: "Comfortably numb" (set 24 days ago)
 
Location: Victory Mansions, Airstrip One
4,395 posts, read 2,712,871 times
Reputation: 5026
Trimming large trees is certainly not cheap. We had 9 mature pecans trimmed last year. Ouch! It was impressive to watch them work. One fellow climbed the trees and did the pruning, while the second guy cut up limbs, stacked the wood that we kept, and loaded the rest onto a trailer. They definitely earned their money, and there's no way I could have done that job myself.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-25-2018, 05:33 PM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
2,653 posts, read 2,265,374 times
Reputation: 2819
I had the same problem in back yard. Palo verde got huge, being near my lawn. Monsoon storm blew it over. Cut it back to the ground. It re-grew fine, but I decided I've had enough with this type tree. Thorny--too common--grows too fast and big because of my nearby lawn. So it's gone.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Arizona > Phoenix area
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top