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Old 02-12-2020, 10:36 PM
 
66 posts, read 43,161 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bawac34618 View Post
The one thing I wish was different politically is the laws on cannabis. This state is still very much in the 1980s on that issue but hopefully that changes after November's elections.
Arizona was one of the first states to legalize medical marijuana, even before other states legalized it recreationally. The state will vote for recreational marijuana in November and is projected to pass.
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Old 02-12-2020, 10:47 PM
 
66 posts, read 43,161 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AndroidAZ View Post
Please don't move here with a negative attitude.

I grew up in Phoenix, really took it for granted. Moved around the world, lived in some of the most "popular" places, and still travel a lot to many other cities regularly.

But having grown and gotten wiser over the years, Phoenix is really an amazing city. It is underappreciated by most people who do not know what this place is like, and cherished by those who are wise enough and grateful enough to know what we have is a very special treasure.

I can live anywhere in the world right now, and I choose Phoenix because it's got the best combination of weather, quality of life, cost of living, and just plain long term sustainability to live here and enjoy the future.
It is very special. Most older experienced corporate types like me love Arizona. It is a much needed break from the usual fast paced stressful urban environment. It is a welcome change. Not having to deal with traffic, rude people, bad weather, high taxes, and a high cost of living is nice. It is arguably the least stressful city I've lived in yet it offers enough amenities to keep you excited so that you aren't bored.

The opinions posted here are extremes. The majority of opinions here are either you love or hate Phoenix and that's just not real life. I have many colleagues and friends who travel to Arizona frequently for business and recreation. They enjoy visiting and vacationing here although they would not want to live here. That does not mean they hate Arizona.They enjoy Phoenix but prefer other cities more. It really depends on the person and what stage of life he or she is in. For example, we have some young people in our company who are in their late 20's. They would prefer to live in a more urban environment where you can walk to most amenities and they have a very lively night life, arts and dining scene. Then you have others who have families and they prefer better weather, large inexpensive homes on large plots of land in safe neighborhoods with proximity to great shopping, grocery stores and children's activities. Phoenix fits the latter crowd better.
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Old 02-12-2020, 10:55 PM
 
8,081 posts, read 6,895,601 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by barca12 View Post
It is very special. Most older experienced corporate types like me love Arizona. It is a much needed break from the usual fast paced stressful urban environment. It is a welcome change. Not having to deal with traffic, rude people, bad weather, high taxes, and a high cost of living is nice. It is arguably the least stressful city I've lived in yet it offers enough amenities to keep you excited so that you aren't bored.

The opinions posted here are extremes. The majority of opinions here are either you love or hate Phoenix and that's just not real life. I have many colleagues and friends who travel to Arizona frequently for business and recreation. They enjoy visiting and vacationing here although they would not want to live here. That does not mean they hate Arizona.They enjoy Phoenix but prefer other cities more. It really depends on the person and what stage of life he or she is in. For example, we have some young people in our company who are in their late 20's. They would prefer to live in a more urban environment where you can walk to most amenities and they have a very lively night life, arts and dining scene. Then you have others who have families and they prefer better weather, large inexpensive homes on large plots of land in safe neighborhoods with proximity to great shopping, grocery stores and children's activities. Phoenix fits the latter crowd better.
I’d contend Phoenix really fits either crowd. Is it better at one? In the suburbs maybe. But many cities are like that. Not everything is a binary choice of this or that
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Old 02-12-2020, 11:15 PM
 
Location: PHX -> ATL
6,311 posts, read 6,729,485 times
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Phoenix's only problem is urban sprawl and the problems that come intertwined with that, like water sustainability (single-family homes use more water than urban housing), higher water bills (as a result of needing more distribution system infrastructure), higher electric bills (infrastructure to cover more land), needing more taxes for less benefits (due to less taxpayers per capita and still wanting good quality benefits that the cities provide), expensive highways, road congestion from induced demand, etc. If the urban sprawl was curtailed, not only would we have more money to go towards education, but we would be able to reign in the summer temperatures and be able to invest more in all the infrastructure in rotting, older inner ring suburban developments.

The heat can be a doozy but that's a personal preference.
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Old 02-12-2020, 11:16 PM
 
66 posts, read 43,161 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JGMotorsport64 View Post
I’d contend Phoenix really fits either crowd. Is it better at one? In the suburbs maybe. But many cities are like that. Not everything is a binary choice of this or that
Young people do not fit neatly in one category either. We cannot assume young people all have the same interests. It depends on the person. For highly educated working professionals, I would argue Phoenix is not high among their lists of places to live. Phoenix is not a densely populated city. It does not have multiple universities. It does not have a great public transportation system. It does not have a large corporate presence with several Fortune 500 companies especially headquarters. It does not have a large population of single adults who have graduate degrees earning high salaries (100K +). It does not have a major international airport that directly connects people all over the world like Asia and many locations in Europe. For many young working professionals, they would prefer to live in a city like New York, San Francisco, Boston, Chicago, Philadelphia, Seattle and Washington DC.
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Old 02-13-2020, 12:36 AM
 
Location: The Republic of Gilead
12,716 posts, read 7,741,223 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by barca12 View Post
Arizona was one of the first states to legalize medical marijuana, even before other states legalized it recreationally. The state will vote for recreational marijuana in November and is projected to pass.
I wish there was a little more protection for medical cardholders when it comes to employment. I had my card in Oklahoma and would get it here if it would make a difference to employers but from everyone I've talked to most employers don't care if you have a card and still have a zero-tolerance policy.

I agree though that if rec is on the ballot this fall it will pass. I'm really looking forward to that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by barca12 View Post
Young people do not fit neatly in one category either. We cannot assume young people all have the same interests. It depends on the person. For highly educated working professionals, I would argue Phoenix is not high among their lists of places to live. Phoenix is not a densely populated city. It does not have multiple universities. It does not have a great public transportation system. It does not have a large corporate presence with several Fortune 500 companies especially headquarters. It does not have a large population of single adults who have graduate degrees earning high salaries (100K +). It does not have a major international airport that directly connects people all over the world like Asia and many locations in Europe. For many young working professionals, they would prefer to live in a city like New York, San Francisco, Boston, Chicago, Philadelphia, Seattle and Washington DC.
Personally, I think Phoenix is just the right size. Large enough that there isn't much I can think of that isn't here other than maybe a beach or a theme park, but it still has a manageable feel. As far as walkability and urban development, the amount of projects planned for downtown over the next five years is incredible. The entire area is going to be completely transformed. However, Phoenix isn't a Northeastern city and shouldn't try to be. I think the city's desert location and how it takes advantage of this makes it a very unique and interesting place. There aren't very many other cities that have so much outdoor recreation right at your doorstep. Also as somebody who hates cold weather, the climate is one of the biggest advantages to me. I had really looked into moving to Denver but I couldn't deal with that much cold and snow. Phoenix's climate is perfect for me.

If I was a millionaire, sure I'd do San Francisco but I'm not. I think Phoenix offers a great balance between quality of life and affordability. Though it isn't as cheap as it used to be, it's still way cheaper than SoCal, the PNW, NYC, or even Denver.
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Old 02-13-2020, 05:11 AM
 
5,427 posts, read 4,409,036 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by barca12 View Post
Young people do not fit neatly in one category either. We cannot assume young people all have the same interests. It depends on the person. For highly educated working professionals, I would argue Phoenix is not high among their lists of places to live. Phoenix is not a densely populated city. It does not have multiple universities. It does not have a great public transportation system. It does not have a large corporate presence with several Fortune 500 companies especially headquarters. It does not have a large population of single adults who have graduate degrees earning high salaries (100K +).
All of this is what I experienced post-undergrad in my 20s a decade+ ago. Of the factors you listed, the corporate presence one was the one that most impacted my quality of life. It was a very tough place for me to launch a career immediately following college graduation. I got a job offer in Phoenix and it seemed like a fun place for recreation. I had been to Phoenix many times prior to me moving there to visit family. Phoenix as a visitor is a much different experience as Phoenix as a day-to-day resident. I learned quickly that I lived Phoenix as a visitor better. Since moving away, I have come back and definitely liked being there as a visitor.

I think there are a lot of places that are awesome as a visitor but not ideal for day-to-day living. A lot of people who lived in highly touristy area do eventually come to that conclusion. While Phoenix is larger and more diversified than a lot of purely tourist places, the tourism/recreation/retiree segment is well represented.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bawac34618 View Post
Personally, I think Phoenix is just the right size. Large enough that there isn't much I can think of that isn't here other than maybe a beach or a theme park, but it still has a manageable feel. As far as walkability and urban development, the amount of projects planned for downtown over the next five years is incredible. The entire area is going to be completely transformed. However, Phoenix isn't a Northeastern city and shouldn't try to be. I think the city's desert location and how it takes advantage of this makes it a very unique and interesting place.
From both my time living there and visits before and after living there, I think the right size was reached around 1990. If one wants to use a larger range of time, 1980-2000. After 2000, too much desert land was torn up for needless development. The corporate presence didn't keep up with growth, so a situation arose where you had a Top 15 metro area population wise, but a corporate base on par with an MSA ranking of like 40-60. That's a difficult disconnect.
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Old 02-13-2020, 07:33 AM
 
9,479 posts, read 12,221,114 times
Reputation: 8774
Quote:
Originally Posted by wase4711 View Post
everyone who has lived here all the time carries extra cold water in the car; obviously, cell phone is mandatory..
also, folks out here are actually helpful to strangers, so NO ONE would let you suffer alone if your car breaks down..

DUI? Hopefully you go right to jail; ZERO tolerance out here...REALLY ZERO..
I never have water in my car so not "everyone" has it
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Old 02-13-2020, 10:34 AM
 
9,675 posts, read 11,037,120 times
Reputation: 8391
Quote:
Originally Posted by wase4711 View Post

DUI? Hopefully you go right to jail; ZERO tolerance out here...REALLY ZERO..
Actually, in AZ it's highly subjective. I'm not a lawyer but maybe JGMotorsport64 can clarify. My understanding of "zero-tolerance" drinking laws impose a penalty on all violations and infractions without any subjective judgment. Often, people reference the term "zero tolerance" only with underage drinking. In AZ, underage drinking is set at 0.00%. Additionally, the AZ drinking laws are objective like 0.04 for commercial drivers and 0.08%+ is considered impaired for 21+ drivers. And 0.15 for excessive DUI.

In most states, your blood alcohol level is exclusively objective. i.e. if you test at 0.07 BAC, you are not legally "drunk". But in AZ, it's up to the officer to decide if someone is impaired below 0.08 and here lies the scary part for those who are not in the know. In AZ, you are often considered "impaired to the slightest degree" and tickets are given out well below the objective 0.08 BAC level. Meaning, you can get a DUI for 0.03 BAC and it factually happens. Our Surprise neighbor who is an officer says it does happen. So a single wine will do you in if you run into a police officer that give you a field sobriety test.

For those who are reading this, the solution is to keep the subjective portion out of the formula. If I had a single drink and I drive, I will take the advice of another PHX Police Sargent friend and never submit to a field sobriety test. Therefore I'm not walking the plank, touching my nose or looking side-to-side. I'll kindly ask to simply test my blood level. It takes the subjective nature out of the decision. Read https://www.arizdui.com/dui-field-so...em-in-arizona/

That all said, I own a top-notch breathalizer. I like to have a glass of wine or a beer at dinner. I want to comply with the laws and therefore, I own one. IMO at 0.06 BAC, you have absolutely no business driving. I won't drive at 0.04% or above. At 0.08 BAC, you are pretty impaired. So I'm with you, toss the book at people who are on the streets driving "drunk" (>.08). So I am not opposed to tightening the laws. My broader point is you can be arrested and a DUI stick at substantially below the objective level. For instance in Surprise, you can get arrested for "driving while black". really.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pyjz4SMKNIk
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Old 02-13-2020, 11:12 AM
 
Location: az
13,294 posts, read 7,699,642 times
Reputation: 9202
When I was in my 20's I often would drink and drive. I was lucky and I was never in an accident or arrested. However, my luck could have gone the other way and I killed someone or myself

Today, I do not drink so it's not an issue while driving.

I do my best to stay off the freeways late Friday/Saturday night because I realize there are drivers who have been drinking.
And some a lot more than legally allowed.

Last edited by john3232; 02-13-2020 at 11:21 AM..
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