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Old 05-13-2021, 09:53 PM
 
Location: East Central Phoenix
6,855 posts, read 10,022,681 times
Reputation: 8100

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katera View Post
Moved here from Texas last year, so we have been through a hot Phoenix summer (and they told us last year was a hot one!). Anyway, it's glorious here. Just freaking glorious. The heat is dry compared to the disgusting humidity of Texas. I'm not even going to compare the **** show weather of Texas (floods, hurricanes, giant hail, crazy lightning, on and on) to Phoenix.

Here's a neat trick btw for anyone in the south considering Phoenix....You know when you go to plan something anywhere in the south and you ALWAYS have to check the weather and even then you have a 50/50 chance it will be rained out or worse? In Phoenix when we now plan to do something the next day, or the next week guess what? WE DON'T EVEN CHECK THE WEATHER BABY! After 28 year in the south I feel like we have finally been freed from purgatory. Dramatic? Maybe, but that doesn't make it any less true.
So you moved here primarily because our weather is better than Texas? Not too swift considering that you essentially traded one set of weather problems for another. We may not have hurricanes, tornadoes, frequent heavy rain, or high humidity, but much of Arizona is in the midst of one of the worst droughts in history. Did you even consider that before you moved for a change in the climate? We're now facing potential water shortages, caused primarily by an excessive amount of what you came here for.

https://www.azcentral.com/story/news...ks/4808587001/
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Old 05-14-2021, 05:04 PM
 
3,431 posts, read 2,397,865 times
Reputation: 3660
Quote:
Originally Posted by Valley Native View Post
So you moved here primarily because our weather is better than Texas? Not too swift considering that you essentially traded one set of weather problems for another. We may not have hurricanes, tornadoes, frequent heavy rain, or high humidity, but much of Arizona is in the midst of one of the worst droughts in history. Did you even consider that before you moved for a change in the climate? We're now facing potential water shortages, caused primarily by an excessive amount of what you came here for.

https://www.azcentral.com/story/news...ks/4808587001/

A drought isn't going to flood your area, create a massive mold problem or tear your roof off. I'm not saying the drought isn't concerning or an issue but I'd much rather figure out how to deal with this than that.
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Old 05-14-2021, 07:54 PM
 
Location: East Central Phoenix
6,855 posts, read 10,022,681 times
Reputation: 8100
Quote:
Originally Posted by locolife View Post
A drought isn't going to flood your area, create a massive mold problem or tear your roof off. I'm not saying the drought isn't concerning or an issue but I'd much rather figure out how to deal with this than that.
What are you saying ... we don't have floods, mold issues, or roofs torn off? Practically anybody who lives in a place with older plumbing (especially galvanized pipes) can tell horror stories about pipes leaking or bursting, causing flooding & damage to the home's interior, which has resulted in toxic mold in some cases. Those kinds of things don't necessarily have to be from weather related events. However, microbursts & flash floods can occur during the summer monsoon, and sometimes during other times of the year, which has resulted in flooding and extensive roof damage.

What I'm saying is: don't try to downplay the seriousness of the drought by suggesting that we don't have to deal with mold, floods, wind damage, etc. We may not have the harsh storms that Texas is known for, but we still have those issues on occasion. We're facing a potentially critical water issue if these current conditions continue. Increasing our population with more clueless sun freaks who apparently don't give much thought to the situation (so long as they don't have to check the weather & their outdoor plans aren't in jeopardy) isn't helping matters.
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Old 05-14-2021, 09:19 PM
 
Location: The Grand Canyon State
6,716 posts, read 3,535,418 times
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Some love the heat here that's okay with me I wonder how much time they actually spend outside from June 1 to Sep 1. The ones I talk to who say this actually spend only a few minutes outside at most walking from their cars.
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Old 05-15-2021, 11:09 AM
 
Location: East Central Phoenix
6,855 posts, read 10,022,681 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kell490 View Post
Some love the heat here that's okay with me I wonder how much time they actually spend outside from June 1 to Sep 1. The ones I talk to who say this actually spend only a few minutes outside at most walking from their cars.
There are those who spend a considerable amount of time outside during the summer, but it's usually in their pools. And of course, they're usually the ones who claim that the heat is very tolerable. Well, of course it's far more tolerable in the water, and for a short time after stepping out of the water. It's also tolerable to be inside where there's an efficient cooling system. I'd like to see how those same ignoramuses would tolerate the summer heat without A/C and/or a pool. The availability of air conditioning is the main reason desert cities like Phoenix mushroomed in population beginning about 70 years ago. If it didn't exist, this would still be a small town.
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Old 05-15-2021, 11:32 AM
 
6,999 posts, read 8,454,537 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Valley Native View Post
I'd like to see how those same ignoramuses would tolerate the summer heat without A/C and/or a pool. The availability of air conditioning is the main reason desert cities like Phoenix mushroomed in population beginning about 70 years ago. If it didn't exist, this would still be a small town.
I'm not sure why you framed your argument this way? Of course, it would be a much smaller town if air conditioning wasn't invented. Canada and Russia would be small if they didn't invent automated heating as well. If you have to work outside in the blazing heat, most people would hate living in AZ. No different if you had to work out in the blowing cold of Canada. Especially if they didn't invent clothes for Canadians.
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Old 05-15-2021, 11:46 AM
 
Location: East Central Phoenix
6,855 posts, read 10,022,681 times
Reputation: 8100
Quote:
Originally Posted by MN-Born-n-Raised View Post
I'm not sure why you framed your argument this way? Of course, it would be a much smaller town if air conditioning wasn't invented. Canada and Russia would be small if they didn't invent automated heating as well. If you have to work outside in the blazing heat, most people would hate living in AZ. No different if you had to work out in the blowing cold of Canada. Especially if they didn't invent clothes for Canadians.
Point being that the population of Phoenix prior to 1950 was less than 100,000. Before then, the city grew at a rather slow rate. Obviously, few people wanted to live here because the summers were too much to handle. The main ways of keeping cool all those years ago were fans, evap coolers, and wrapping themselves in wet sheets (read article below). It was during the 1950s post WWIII era when air conditioning became more readily available and affordable that Phoenix's population exploded, and continued to rapidly grow ever since. I know you understand what I'm getting at, but it was mainly aimed at all the ones who blow off our summer heat as being "tolerable" or even "enjoyable". Fact is, most of them would be miserable without these extra amenities!

https://www.12news.com/article/weath...0stay%20cooler.
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Old Yesterday, 01:15 AM
 
Location: The Grand Canyon State
6,716 posts, read 3,535,418 times
Reputation: 5723
I know people who enjoy the heat I would never tell someone that the heat here is so much more tolerable then southern state like Florida. I spent 2 weeks in August in Florida to me it was much more tolerable then here. It rained every afternoon, and it cooled down at night. Here in Phoenix the temp has a low of 100F concrete radiates heat all night long. This is why I always advise if you want to feel the heat here show up after July 4th though August 15th those weeks are the worst of it. June can spike high temps but it's very dry so not too bad. July add 20% humidity over 110F then that's when things get difficult.
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Old Yesterday, 10:46 AM
 
6,999 posts, read 8,454,537 times
Reputation: 6400
Quote:
Originally Posted by kell490 View Post
I know people who enjoy the heat I would never tell someone that the heat here is so much more tolerable then southern state like Florida. I spent 2 weeks in August in Florida to me it was much more tolerable then here. It rained every afternoon, and it cooled down at night. Here in Phoenix the temp has a low of 100F concrete radiates heat all night long. This is why I always advise if you want to feel the heat here show up after July 4th though August 15th those weeks are the worst of it. June can spike high temps but it's very dry so not too bad. July add 20% humidity over 110F then that's when things get difficult.
Excessive heat and humidity are subjective. I know people who LOVE sticky, humid weather. I also know people who LOVE the cold. They argue to simply layer up their clothes. Others like to play in the snow as they enjoy the cozy feeling (my wife). To each their own. Personally, I cannot stomach the humidity. But I will take it over the snow and cold. Humidity makes me physically lazy. Plus, I despise wearing clothes when I sweat.

We had a home on the beach in Mazatlan, MX. In summer visits, as long as you were in the pool with an ice-cold Pacifico beer with a lime in hand (Mazatlan made), life was great.
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Old Yesterday, 11:05 AM
 
Location: The Grand Canyon State
6,716 posts, read 3,535,418 times
Reputation: 5723
Quote:
Originally Posted by MN-Born-n-Raised View Post
Excessive heat and humidity are subjective. I know people who LOVE sticky, humid weather. I also know people who LOVE the cold. They argue to simply layer up their clothes. Others like to play in the snow as they enjoy the cozy feeling (my wife). To each their own. Personally, I cannot stomach the humidity. But I will take it over the snow and cold. Humidity makes me physically lazy. Plus, I despise wearing clothes when I sweat.

We had a home on the beach in Mazatlan, MX. In summer visits, as long as you were in the pool with an ice-cold Pacifico beer with a lime in hand (Mazatlan made), life was great.
I agree everyone is different I don't mind snow for me I can work all day outside in 30-40F temps with just a tee shirt and long sleeve over that. I like skiing and snowboarding while it's snowing perfect temp is 10F. I was made for snow my family immigrated from Russia and Lithuania 150 years ago must be in the genes.
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