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Old 05-17-2021, 11:49 AM
 
7,503 posts, read 8,881,210 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kell490 View Post
I agree everyone is different I don't mind snow for me I can work all day outside in 30-40F temps with just a tee shirt and long sleeve over that. I like skiing and snowboarding while it's snowing perfect temp is 10F. I was made for snow my family immigrated from Russia and Lithuania 150 years ago must be in the genes.
I often wonder if there is something to that. Speaking of Mazatlan, MX, gardeners would wear thicker long-sleeve shirts and long pants when it is HOT and HUMID! I would pass out.

I am 75% Finnish. I don't mind the cold. I can wear shorts all day in 30-degree weather. My beef with the cold isn't the snow. Rather the 40% winter cloud cover. I would get p*ssed even after a couple of days of gray skies. I could remember 5 days in a row of clouds, then the afternoon sun, and another 3-4 days of clouds. As they say, YMMV.
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Old 05-17-2021, 01:13 PM
 
3,579 posts, read 2,622,780 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Valley Native View Post
What are you saying ... we don't have floods, mold issues, or roofs torn off? Practically anybody who lives in a place with older plumbing (especially galvanized pipes) can tell horror stories about pipes leaking or bursting, causing flooding & damage to the home's interior, which has resulted in toxic mold in some cases. Those kinds of things don't necessarily have to be from weather related events. However, microbursts & flash floods can occur during the summer monsoon, and sometimes during other times of the year, which has resulted in flooding and extensive roof damage.

What I'm saying is: don't try to downplay the seriousness of the drought by suggesting that we don't have to deal with mold, floods, wind damage, etc. We may not have the harsh storms that Texas is known for, but we still have those issues on occasion. We're facing a potentially critical water issue if these current conditions continue. Increasing our population with more clueless sun freaks who apparently don't give much thought to the situation (so long as they don't have to check the weather & their outdoor plans aren't in jeopardy) isn't helping matters.
Compared to the south our issues with natural disasters, including things like flooding which directly relates to roofs being torn off (via major storms) and mold (also tied to excessive amounts of water) is virtually non-existent here. It's one of the reasons why data centers choose to locate here. You can see how eastern Texas cities rank near the very top. I'm not talking about pipes breaking, that happens everywhere although the deep freeze in Texas last winter probably created more of that in TX then most other states combined.

I've never said the drought or climate change isn't a real issue but every city has climate challenges being exacerbated by the warming planet. If I have to pick one, which in the real world we do, the drought/heat is my choice. I'm also with you on clueless growth... I'd be okay if we stick around 5 million for a while.


Moderator cut: link removed, competitor site

Last edited by Yac; 05-18-2021 at 11:09 PM..
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Old 05-17-2021, 03:21 PM
 
365 posts, read 502,509 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Valley Native View Post
So you moved here primarily because our weather is better than Texas? Not too swift considering that you essentially traded one set of weather problems for another. We may not have hurricanes, tornadoes, frequent heavy rain, or high humidity, but much of Arizona is in the midst of one of the worst droughts in history. Did you even consider that before you moved for a change in the climate? We're now facing potential water shortages, caused primarily by an excessive amount of what you came here for.

https://www.azcentral.com/story/news...ks/4808587001/

Oh LOL. You are actually saying I'm not too swift (your words) for trading one set of weather problems for another? You are ACTUALLY comparing Texas weather with Arizona in terms of severity!? Have you ever lived in Texas? Have you seen how much it costs to insure your house in Texas? We were paying $3k/year there. Here for a similar price? $741/year. Why do you think that is? Well I will tell you what the insurance agent told us...Texas has the most severe damaging weather in the country and they had no choice but to skyrocket their rates. You realize one of the floods that put 4ft of water in my house (it happened twice btw) while we lived in Houston, flooded and destroyed over 1 million cars? That was just one of Texas' many disasters. Two weeks ago Fort Worth had lemon sized hail that wiped out thousands of cars including several of our friends vehicles. My car was hit by softball size hail a few years ago in Rockwall TX which totaled it. How often does that happen here? As for AZ being in a drought......it's a desert. We live in a desert. When I turn the faucet water comes out. The end.

So did I compare...."disasters" before we moved? Yes, and Texas was weighed, measured and found wanting.....

We LOOOOVE Arizona.
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Old 05-17-2021, 05:09 PM
 
Location: Arizona
7,986 posts, read 3,988,556 times
Reputation: 6311
Quote:
Originally Posted by MN-Born-n-Raised View Post
I often wonder if there is something to that. Speaking of Mazatlan, MX, gardeners would wear thicker long-sleeve shirts and long pants when it is HOT and HUMID! I would pass out.

I am 75% Finnish. I don't mind the cold. I can wear shorts all day in 30-degree weather. My beef with the cold isn't the snow. Rather the 40% winter cloud cover. I would get p*ssed even after a couple of days of gray skies. I could remember 5 days in a row of clouds, then the afternoon sun, and another 3-4 days of clouds. As they say, YMMV.
Your talking about Midwest type weather where I prefer the rocky mountains where it snows then clears up its sunny the snow melts off the roads stays up in the higher elevations 8500 plus. I like the high altitude mountain passes goes up over 10k feet Skiing up to 11.5k feet.

I'm waiting for spacex to get done with testing we plan on moving I can work remote my employer has gone 100% remote for several departments took away our offices. I'm giving it until 2022 just to make sure they don't change their minds.
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Old 05-17-2021, 10:02 PM
 
Location: East Central Phoenix
7,113 posts, read 10,372,451 times
Reputation: 8423
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katera View Post
Oh LOL. You are actually saying I'm not too swift (your words) for trading one set of weather problems for another? You are ACTUALLY comparing Texas weather with Arizona in terms of severity!? Have you ever lived in Texas? Have you seen how much it costs to insure your house in Texas? We were paying $3k/year there. Here for a similar price? $741/year. Why do you think that is? Well I will tell you what the insurance agent told us...Texas has the most severe damaging weather in the country and they had no choice but to skyrocket their rates. You realize one of the floods that put 4ft of water in my house (it happened twice btw) while we lived in Houston, flooded and destroyed over 1 million cars? That was just one of Texas' many disasters. Two weeks ago Fort Worth had lemon sized hail that wiped out thousands of cars including several of our friends vehicles. My car was hit by softball size hail a few years ago in Rockwall TX which totaled it. How often does that happen here?
Yes, I am fully aware of what the weather is like in Texas, and I agree: it sucks for the most part. But obviously the 29+ million residents of Texas reside there for various reasons. Perhaps some Texans actually like the climate there, but I would make an educated guess that the majority of Texans reside there because of the business climate and job opportunities. This is evident from the way Houston, Dallas, and especially Austin have seen significant growth in recent years despite all the severe storms. They apparently contend with all the crappy weather because there are things in life that (believe it or not) are much more important.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Katera View Post
As for AZ being in a drought......it's a desert. We live in a desert. When I turn the faucet water comes out. The end.
Somehow I expected that completely IGNORANT answer from a transplant who moved here for a change in the weather. First of all, not all of Arizona is desert ... however, despite that, the entire state is in one of the worst droughts in history. There have been numerous reports on TV and on line about how serious the drought is right now, and it's gotten to the point where we're facing potential water shortages. Apparently you knew nothing about this and don't care, just as long as water comes out of your faucet. Do you even know where our water comes from, or did you think a magical fairy inside your pipes manufactures it?
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Old 05-18-2021, 08:48 AM
 
3,579 posts, read 2,622,780 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Valley Native View Post
Yes, I am fully aware of what the weather is like in Texas, and I agree: it sucks for the most part. But obviously the 29+ million residents of Texas reside there for various reasons. Perhaps some Texans actually like the climate there, but I would make an educated guess that the majority of Texans reside there because of the business climate and job opportunities. This is evident from the way Houston, Dallas, and especially Austin have seen significant growth in recent years despite all the severe storms. They apparently contend with all the crappy weather because there are things in life that (believe it or not) are much more important.

You act like people don't live in or move to Phoenix or Arizona for job opportunities. Which makes zero sense, Phoenix is the economic hub of the state, if people lived in AZ solely for the weather they'd probably all be in Prescott or Payson where the summer is less intense. But alas, people in the Grand Canyon state live where jobs are located as well so most of us reside here in valley.
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Old 05-18-2021, 09:05 AM
 
1,331 posts, read 1,628,160 times
Reputation: 1564
Quote:
Originally Posted by Valley Native View Post
Somehow I expected that completely IGNORANT answer from a transplant who moved here for a change in the weather. First of all, not all of Arizona is desert ... however, despite that, the entire state is in one of the worst droughts in history. There have been numerous reports on TV and on line about how serious the drought is right now, and it's gotten to the point where we're facing potential water shortages. Apparently you knew nothing about this and don't care, just as long as water comes out of your faucet. Do you even know where our water comes from, or did you think a magical fairy inside your pipes manufactures it?
Unfortunately this mindset is all too common among transplants. Katera you are correct, it is the desert and all the more reason we need to be conserving water as best we can.
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Old 05-18-2021, 09:42 AM
 
Location: Arizona
7,986 posts, read 3,988,556 times
Reputation: 6311
Quote:
Originally Posted by Valley Native View Post
Yes, I am fully aware of what the weather is like in Texas, and I agree: it sucks for the most part. But obviously the 29+ million residents of Texas reside there for various reasons. Perhaps some Texans actually like the climate there, but I would make an educated guess that the majority of Texans reside there because of the business climate and job opportunities. This is evident from the way Houston, Dallas, and especially Austin have seen significant growth in recent years despite all the severe storms. They apparently contend with all the crappy weather because there are things in life that (believe it or not) are much more important.



Somehow I expected that completely IGNORANT answer from a transplant who moved here for a change in the weather. First of all, not all of Arizona is desert ... however, despite that, the entire state is in one of the worst droughts in history. There have been numerous reports on TV and on line about how serious the drought is right now, and it's gotten to the point where we're facing potential water shortages. Apparently you knew nothing about this and don't care, just as long as water comes out of your faucet. Do you even know where our water comes from, or did you think a magical fairy inside your pipes manufactures it?
My thoughts are that the drought in the southwest will become a real problem we wait until it's blowing up in our face we watch the news shrug it off as a government problem. Government is trying to cater to all parties farming in the desert is one of the biggest waste of water IMO. Not only that we have a nuclear power plant here that uses up gray water could be used for farming. The plant last year attempted to tap into well water but was rejected as they will also have problems getting enough gray water as conserving start to cut back for cities. Water issues cascade into everything here in the southwest just don't realize the problems we will have in the near future.

It's a fact that the entire water supply for the southwest is drying up if we don't conserve now won't be any southwest. It will take 10-15 years of heavy snow to recover what we had before.

I was just watching a program about new desalination plants that came on line in southern California over the last 5-8 years. The problem with those is they discharge millions of gallons of brine the salt which is filtered out is dumped back in the ocean causing environmental damage.

Last edited by kell490; 05-18-2021 at 10:39 AM..
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Old 10-22-2021, 03:58 PM
 
2 posts, read 124 times
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Default Pennslyvania Native

I was born and raised in Pennsylvania and I prefer the dry heat. Somewhere between 80-85 degrees feels really nice (think 70-75 degrees with humidity) and the humidity is almost nonexistent. The heat starts to become overwhelming in the low 100s. The summer was fairly short this year which is a plus, but AZ has great weather for 9 months and during the summer you stay inside or hop in the pool with a hat, easy fix!
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Old 10-22-2021, 04:39 PM
 
1,039 posts, read 1,079,689 times
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TLDR; IMHO

Inside and under shade humid heat is worse, in direct sun Phoenix dry heat is worse (protect your skin, sun burns are brutal). Dehydration is always a concern so keep hydrated more than you'd expect.


Longer answer:

Again dehydration is a big concern when it's so dry. Compounded by any eating, drinking, or medicating habits that dehydrate yourself more (like meds that cause dry mouth). Lots of new arrivals feel slightly sick for long periods of time because they are dehydrated and need to drink more hydrating liquids. Water is definitely your friend.

Inside you have AC. If you can afford to run the AC to your comfort then it's not so bad. Unless you either have to work outside (a completely different experience then) or are determined to do outside activities consistently throughout summer then in summer it's basically a game of run to AC spot to another. If you can afford it then it's really not too bad.

Outside the very high dry heat beating down on your skin can be absolutely brutal. My wife came to go to college from Utah, even from a high desert area already. She sat out at her apartments pool in shorts to get some sun and got serious sunburn from just an hour or two. The sun is more brutal here than most places. Even if you don't burn easily use protection and learn how you react to it, don't underestimate it. The drying effect on your skin can be really brutal too. In ways you might not have experienced elsewhere.

All things you can adapt and learn around and if you're already use to a place with relatively high heat then it's probably not a big deal.
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