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Old 04-13-2021, 08:46 AM
 
3,396 posts, read 2,370,697 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Starbar View Post
I'm considering it myself, Nevada's no state income tax sounds like a great deal.
You're only looking at one piece of a big picture in income tax. Don't forget to look at all the other taxes you'll pay in the state. Nevada actually ranks one position higher than Arizona in total tax burden. If you want rock bottom taxes head to America's Last Frontier, Alaska.

https://wallethub.com/edu/states-wit...x-burden/20494
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Old 04-13-2021, 09:38 PM
 
Location: East Central Phoenix
6,834 posts, read 9,991,294 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by locolife View Post
The entire Reno metro area is the size of Mesa, there's really no comparison to Phoenix. Reno probably works fine if a small city lifestyle works for you and your main priorities are cooler temps than Phoenix and a dry climate.
You're absolutely correct, but one thing is left out: the fact that a lot of people consider Phoenix to be rather underwhelming for a city its size ... mainly because there isn't much that stands out as spectacular or interesting on a big city level. Even with all the growth & additions in the last decade or so, Phoenix is still thought of as a hot desert, a big sprawling suburb, or a retirement haven. This is the perception we still have to many outsiders, thanks largely to our focus and the type of newcomers we attract.
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Old 04-14-2021, 08:13 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Valley Native View Post
You're absolutely correct, but one thing is left out: the fact that a lot of people consider Phoenix to be rather underwhelming for a city its size ... mainly because there isn't much that stands out as spectacular or interesting on a big city level. Even with all the growth & additions in the last decade or so, Phoenix is still thought of as a hot desert, a big sprawling suburb, or a retirement haven. This is the perception we still have to many outsiders, thanks largely to our focus and the type of newcomers we attract.
If one finds metro Phoenix underwhelming, with the nearly non-stop events that occur from fall through spring every year, they're really going to be let down by Reno.

As the 13th largest CSA, roughly the size of Detroit, I'd say Phoenix actually punches slightly above it's weight in terms of sheer amount of interesting things to do and being a high tourism area probably has something to do with it imo. From the DBG and MIM to Spring Training, Barrett Jackson, the Phoenix Open there's no shortage of interesting events.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Combined_statistical_area
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Old 04-14-2021, 10:09 PM
 
Location: East Central Phoenix
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Quote:
Originally Posted by locolife View Post
If one finds metro Phoenix underwhelming, with the nearly non-stop events that occur from fall through spring every year, they're really going to be let down by Reno.
You're correct about Reno, but that's to be expected since it's a much smaller city & metro area ... although their casinos & entertainment (while not on the scale of Vegas) provide Reno with a bit of flair and nightlife.

Quote:
Originally Posted by locolife View Post
As the 13th largest CSA, roughly the size of Detroit, I'd say Phoenix actually punches slightly above it's weight in terms of sheer amount of interesting things to do and being a high tourism area probably has something to do with it imo. From the DBG and MIM to Spring Training, Barrett Jackson, the Phoenix Open there's no shortage of interesting events.
See, this is where you miss the point. When people say that Phoenix is underwhelming for a city its size, they're mainly referring to the lack of urbanity and big city attractions other than desert vegetation, golf tournaments, car shows, or spring training. I'm actually kind of surprised you didn't include hiking trails on your list. You can get those things in practically any small or mid sized city.
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Old 04-15-2021, 01:21 AM
 
Location: The Grand Canyon State
6,667 posts, read 3,504,790 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by locolife View Post
You're only looking at one piece of a big picture in income tax. Don't forget to look at all the other taxes you'll pay in the state. Nevada actually ranks one position higher than Arizona in total tax burden. If you want rock bottom taxes head to America's Last Frontier, Alaska.

https://wallethub.com/edu/states-wit...x-burden/20494
This thread was about the weather I only brought up Reno because I like the weather there get the dry climate but not nearly as hot as here. While I know Phoenix is not as humid as Memphis, TN in July it's lot hotter so add 30% humidity at 114F it's no longer a dry heat. All you need to do is look at the heat index around the country you see at some points in the summer Phoenix has the highest heat index of all cities. Then when rest of the country is cooling down were still in the 100's going all the way to Halloween.
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Old 04-15-2021, 02:08 AM
 
Location: Live:Downtown Phoenix, AZ/Work:Greater Los Angeles, CA
25,844 posts, read 10,241,877 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kell490 View Post
This thread was about the weather I only brought up Reno because I like the weather there get the dry climate but not nearly as hot as here. While I know Phoenix is not as humid as Memphis, TN in July it's lot hotter so add 30% humidity at 114F it's no longer a dry heat. All you need to do is look at the heat index around the country you see at some points in the summer Phoenix has the highest heat index of all cities. Then when rest of the country is cooling down were still in the 100's going all the way to Halloween.
30% Humidity at 114°F would be a dewpoint of 78°F. The only part of the world that experiences that is the Persian Gulf region. The Dewpoint has never been above 60°F in Phoenix when the temp has been that high
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Old 04-15-2021, 02:48 AM
 
Location: Phoenix
23,603 posts, read 12,708,450 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FirebirdCamaro1220 View Post
30% Humidity at 114°F would be a dewpoint of 78°F. The only part of the world that experiences that is the Persian Gulf region. The Dewpoint has never been above 60°F in Phoenix when the temp has been that high
Yeah I worked several years in Kuwait and Saudi near that Gulf and it was brutal and makes Phoenix seem not hot in comparison. Most of the time it was dry but when the wind blows from the Gulf it gets incredibly humid to go with the 120F plus temps.
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Old 04-15-2021, 10:00 AM
 
3,396 posts, read 2,370,697 times
Reputation: 3604
Quote:
Originally Posted by kell490 View Post
This thread was about the weather I only brought up Reno because I like the weather there get the dry climate but not nearly as hot as here. While I know Phoenix is not as humid as Memphis, TN in July it's lot hotter so add 30% humidity at 114F it's no longer a dry heat. All you need to do is look at the heat index around the country you see at some points in the summer Phoenix has the highest heat index of all cities. Then when rest of the country is cooling down were still in the 100's going all the way to Halloween.
Yep, you brought up Reno for the weather and someone responded regarding the no state income tax. My comment wasn't to you. Have a good one.

Last edited by locolife; 04-15-2021 at 10:34 AM..
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Old 04-15-2021, 06:19 PM
 
Location: East Central Phoenix
6,834 posts, read 9,991,294 times
Reputation: 8073
Quote:
Originally Posted by kell490 View Post
This thread was about the weather I only brought up Reno because I like the weather there get the dry climate but not nearly as hot as here. While I know Phoenix is not as humid as Memphis, TN in July it's lot hotter so add 30% humidity at 114F it's no longer a dry heat. All you need to do is look at the heat index around the country you see at some points in the summer Phoenix has the highest heat index of all cities. Then when rest of the country is cooling down were still in the 100's going all the way to Halloween.
Not sure if you've noticed this (being that you're probably as much of a heat hater as I am): I find that the angle of the sun can make a big difference. When it starts getting warm to hot in April or May, it feels worse out in the direct sunlight than when we have similar temperatures in October or early November because the sun's intensity is greater in the spring than in the fall. Couple this with the fact that the percentage of sunshine in the spring is higher here due to less cloud cover. Also, after enduring nearly 4 months of daytime temps in the 105 to 115 range, a temperature of 99 or 100 in October doesn't seem nearly as bad. Just my observations.
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Old 04-19-2021, 06:02 PM
 
7 posts, read 5,221 times
Reputation: 15
Default Dry heat is difficult

I spent 2 months during the height of summer in Tempe. The heat was difficult at times. It felt like I had put my whole body in the oven to roast. Seriously. And the difference between humid heat and dry heat is that you don't have to constantly think about hydrating with humid heat. I don't like drinking water so for me, it was hard to remember to drink water before I left the house, carry water with me at all times and drink it purposely during the day even if I didn't feel thirsty. One episode of heat exhaustion was all it took to remind me of drinking water all the time.
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