U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Arizona > Phoenix area
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-07-2021, 06:55 PM
 
3,161 posts, read 1,148,392 times
Reputation: 9101

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by locolife View Post
Most people I know who visit in the summer are surprised that it's not as bad as they were expecting.
I was there in June a couple of decades ago to work on some equipment, and it hit 118°F, if I remember correctly. There is a huge difference at that temperature between being in the sun, and being in the shade with some air movement (the shop had these big fans they could roll around, and even had some huge "swamp coolers" that reduced the air temperature about 20°F - made a HUGE difference). But yeah, having some shade and water available makes it a whole different ballgame. We were out in the desert, and had to be on our toes for scorpions and rattlers, but it was a great trip overall, I think Phoenix might be a great place to live.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-07-2021, 08:11 PM
 
Location: East Central Phoenix
6,868 posts, read 10,032,366 times
Reputation: 8109
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maroon197 View Post
Downtown Tempe, which has always been the most architecturally appealing part of the valley, has become an out of control hodgepodge of increasingly ugly midrise towers with garish color schemes and overly modern/cheap designs that are guaranteed not to age well. With all the free money flowing the past few years, they just keep building more and more of the things without a thought as to the impact on aesthetics, quality of life, traffic etc. People tend to perceive new as “good”. The problem is those things don’t stay new, and then you’re just left with a bunch of aging oversized eyesores you cant change.

Real urban planning includes considerations on functionality, street level impact, transportation options etc. Instead we get a wildly expensive and disruptive trolley that circles the asu campus and goes literally nowhere useful (unless you’re a student who doesn’t want to walk from one side of campus to the other.) And we already had orbit buses for that.
I beg to differ. For a suburb, Tempe has been a great example of what effective urban planning should be. They're not tearing down any historic structures to put new buildings in their place. In fact, they've actually been careful to preserve as much as they possibly can. Besides, Tempe is fully landlocked, and the only way they can possibly grow is to build upward ... which means more new midrise & highrise structures which you apparently dislike. It seems that you dislike anything about Phoenix & the metro area.

Quote:
Originally Posted by gsm113 View Post
Although s/he is right about the trolley. 2 years of traffic disruptions for something of questionable value.
I disagree. In fact, Valley Metro can take some hints from the Tempe streetcar on where to put additional light rail lines within the city of Phoenix. Instead of having them run to outdated suburban styled shopping malls, the routes should be where the demand is highest, which would be primarily on downtown/midtown streets. I think the proposed light rail extensions to south Phoenix and the west side will serve the demand quite well, however.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Curly Q. Bobalink View Post
I was there in June a couple of decades ago to work on some equipment, and it hit 118°F, if I remember correctly. There is a huge difference at that temperature between being in the sun, and being in the shade with some air movement (the shop had these big fans they could roll around, and even had some huge "swamp coolers" that reduced the air temperature about 20°F - made a HUGE difference). But yeah, having some shade and water available makes it a whole different ballgame. We were out in the desert, and had to be on our toes for scorpions and rattlers, but it was a great trip overall, I think Phoenix might be a great place to live.
Snakes are pretty much a non issue, unless you're in a preserve area or out in the middle of nowhere. Same with scorpions, although I've heard some neighborhoods have problems with them more than others. In most cases, if you stay away from their environment, they'll leave you alone.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-07-2021, 09:34 PM
 
Location: The 480
84 posts, read 38,262 times
Reputation: 169
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bondurant View Post
I cannot agree. The modern architecture here is a fault. City Hall is an eyesore. Love the architecture of the older building and some of the unique building you will see here and there in the valley. The modern stuff, not for me.
I agree, this is also one of my least favorite things about the Phoenix area. When I lived in Oregon, I was never that far from historic downtowns and old craftsman houses. I live in Chandler and the historic downtown area is nice but not quite like how they are in Oregon, and there are some craftsman houses near by but not many. Other than that, you have to drive pretty out of your way to see real history, Arizona has a lot by the way, but it often means driving at least an hour, usually further, and not everyone has the time or money for that. Prescott is nice and has a lot of historic architecture, it really reminds me of Central Oregon, I'm hoping to move there one day.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-07-2021, 10:13 PM
 
Location: Phoenix,AZ
741 posts, read 456,680 times
Reputation: 658
Quote:
Originally Posted by 49erfan916 View Post
No way, I am from Sacramento! Congrats on your pending move.
You live in Phoenix now?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-07-2021, 10:46 PM
 
3,161 posts, read 1,148,392 times
Reputation: 9101
Quote:
Originally Posted by Valley Native View Post
Snakes are pretty much a non issue, unless you're in a preserve area or out in the middle of nowhere. Same with scorpions, although I've heard some neighborhoods have problems with them more than others. In most cases, if you stay away from their environment, they'll leave you alone.
It was a stretch to say it was "Phoenix", it was in Litchfield Park, not too far from some mountainous terrain. Cat, VW, and Case all had proving grounds out there, and at the time, there wasn't anything built up around it. I remember a couple of the guys stationed there that said they had asked Corporate if they could wear sidearms with snake shot, but got turned down. Their shop had a bunch of hardware bins, and I was warned never to just reach inside one, to always take it off the shelf and look in it before removing a bolt or something. I used their washroom a day or two after the exterminator was out, and there were numerous, dead, small, tan/translucent scorpions around the perimeter of the room, they probably were in there looking for water. I learned to "look, then touch". Manufacturers supposedly love to test their equipment out there not only because of the heat, but also because of that very fine, very abrasive soil (callieche?), if a piece of equipment proves itself out there, it will work almost anywhere. I was just on Google Maps looking for it, and saw Toyota has built a big test track on the west side of the mountain. Fun trip.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-08-2021, 12:00 AM
 
542 posts, read 785,816 times
Reputation: 1453
Quote:
Originally Posted by Valley Native View Post
I beg to differ. For a suburb, Tempe has been a great example of what effective urban planning should be. They're not tearing down any historic structures to put new buildings in their place. In fact, they've actually been careful to preserve as much as they possibly can. Besides, Tempe is fully landlocked, and the only way they can possibly grow is to build upward ... which means more new midrise & highrise structures which you apparently dislike. It seems that you dislike anything about Phoenix & the metro area.



I disagree. In fact, Valley Metro can take some hints from the Tempe streetcar on where to put additional light rail lines within the city of Phoenix. Instead of having them run to outdated suburban styled shopping malls, the routes should be where the demand is highest, which would be primarily on downtown/midtown streets. I think the proposed light rail extensions to south Phoenix and the west side will serve the demand quite well, however.



Snakes are pretty much a non issue, unless you're in a preserve area or out in the middle of nowhere. Same with scorpions, although I've heard some neighborhoods have problems with them more than others. In most cases, if you stay away from their environment, they'll leave you alone.
There’s nothing wrong with building upwards and adding mid rise structures. But when those structures are cheap bright orange or neon green boxes, you’re obviously not building something timeless. The brickyard development on mill is a great example of a midrise structure that blends in to the historical surroundings and demonstrates actual care and consideration for local aesthetics. But the days of caring about that kind of stuff are gone. once the free money started flowing, history went out the window and it became a frenzied free for all of ultra modern, cheaply constructed eyesores.

And as for your take on the street car, look up a route map. It runs in a small area around asu which is already extremely well served by 3 light rail stops and free shuttles. Unless you live in a dorm on Apache and want to get to the bars on mill without walking 10 minutes or taking a shuttle, you would have no reason to ever use it. With such a short, unnecessary, and impractical route, it makes you wonder what kind of ridiculous back room deals led to its creation.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-08-2021, 07:13 AM
 
Location: Buffalo, NY
2,648 posts, read 1,898,179 times
Reputation: 6577
Quote:
Originally Posted by wase4711 View Post
after multiple decades living in Chiraq and the surrounding suburbs, I can say DEFINITIVELY that phoenix is one of the SAFER big cities. no doubt about it..
My only fears here are getting hit by a car while crossing the street, and getting killed by some moron doing 30mph over the limit while driving...
Deaths in motor vehicles accidents 2013-2019:

Maricopa County: 3249 - 10.3 deaths per 100k per year
Cook County: 2234 - 6.1 deaths per 100k per year
New York County: 234 - 2.0 deaths per 100k per year

Deaths by firearms 2014-2019

Maricopa County: 3033 - 11.3 deaths per 100k per year
Cook County: 3909 - 12.7 deaths per 100k per year
New York County: 127 - 1.3 deaths per 100k per year

Total unnatural deaths (firearm and auto) per capita per year
Maricopa County - 21.6
Cook County - 18.8
New York County - 3.3

Source: https://www.countyhealthrankings.org...ealth-rankings
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-08-2021, 10:51 AM
 
78 posts, read 37,736 times
Reputation: 207
Quote:
Originally Posted by RocketSci View Post
Deaths in motor vehicles accidents 2013-2019:

Maricopa County: 3249 - 10.3 deaths per 100k per year
Cook County: 2234 - 6.1 deaths per 100k per year
New York County: 234 - 2.0 deaths per 100k per year

Deaths by firearms 2014-2019

Maricopa County: 3033 - 11.3 deaths per 100k per year
Cook County: 3909 - 12.7 deaths per 100k per year
New York County: 127 - 1.3 deaths per 100k per year

Total unnatural deaths (firearm and auto) per capita per year
Maricopa County - 21.6
Cook County - 18.8
New York County - 3.3

Source: https://www.countyhealthrankings.org...ealth-rankings
Huh .. yet, oddly .. I'll still prefer to take my chances in the Phoenix Metro over NY and Chicago any day of the week. I'm betting those numbers drastically increased in NY and Chicago with all of the unrest that occured during and since 2020. IF that site can accurately keep up with all of that lovely activity. Questionable at best.

Last edited by TedMosby; 05-08-2021 at 11:03 AM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-08-2021, 11:09 AM
 
8,158 posts, read 14,048,557 times
Reputation: 9546
Quote:
Originally Posted by LS Jaun View Post
"Nonsense"? It's data , that's it. It's Data from city data. Did I say it was small town vs. large city, no. Sorry Mr. Detroit, the data on the city data site wasn't wrapped around your small city, big city comparison. Anyway, We are definately better than your city, Detroit
Yes, utter nonsense. Raw data needs context and interpretation. Your conclusion that Phoenix is a high crime city based on the raw data you found isn't an accurate interpretation. The stats you're citing actually support Phoenix as being a safer city. Context and interpretation matter.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-08-2021, 11:40 AM
 
Location: Live:Downtown Phoenix, AZ/Work:Greater Los Angeles, CA
26,072 posts, read 10,390,150 times
Reputation: 8654
Quote:
Originally Posted by RocketSci View Post
Deaths in motor vehicles accidents 2013-2019:

Maricopa County: 3249 - 10.3 deaths per 100k per year
Cook County: 2234 - 6.1 deaths per 100k per year
New York County: 234 - 2.0 deaths per 100k per year

Deaths by firearms 2014-2019

Maricopa County: 3033 - 11.3 deaths per 100k per year
Cook County: 3909 - 12.7 deaths per 100k per year
New York County: 127 - 1.3 deaths per 100k per year

Total unnatural deaths (firearm and auto) per capita per year
Maricopa County - 21.6
Cook County - 18.8
New York County - 3.3

Source: https://www.countyhealthrankings.org...ealth-rankings
Not even an apples-apples comparison as New York County is only Manhattan, the city is spread among 5 counties (1 for each borough), and Bronx and Kings Counties (Bronx and Brooklyn) have much higher crime stats than New York County (Manhattan)
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Arizona > Phoenix area

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top