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Old 06-21-2021, 08:07 PM
 
13 posts, read 6,057 times
Reputation: 54

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We recently discovered a backup in our 1977 house that we just moved into. It’s been a hellish renovation - during the times of corona no less. Just as we were seeing a light at the end of the tunnel, our laundry room flooded.

After dealing with the useless company my home warranty company sent out, we called a large plumbing company here in the valley. Are we allowed to name names?

The service was good, but they send out a sales guy disguised as a “manager” to find more problems and charge you five mortgage payments to fix them.

We had the initial clog cleared, then paid the extra $5k to dig up and replace a few feet of line that roots had grown into.

What’s done is done, but I’m curious if anyone had similar work on their house, and what they paid.
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Old 06-21-2021, 08:11 PM
 
263 posts, read 245,875 times
Reputation: 275
I hope this is cautionary for everyone else to add sewer backup coverage to their HO insurance policy. Not every insurer offers it, but I know USAA and Auto Owners do.
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Old 06-21-2021, 08:50 PM
 
822 posts, read 482,680 times
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Most municipalities offer sewer line and water main coverage for about 70 bucks per year.
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Old 06-22-2021, 05:39 AM
 
3,591 posts, read 8,144,855 times
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This was a different state, but I had the same issue about a decade ago and was quoted roughly $6000 to properly fix my plumbing. Then I compared that to the $250 a year I was spending on my annual visit from RotoRooter and I lived with the problem because I knew I'd only live in the house for a few more years.
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Old 06-22-2021, 06:39 AM
 
Location: Valley of the Sun
2,142 posts, read 1,611,254 times
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Had to have a trenchless sewer pipe put in, running about 30ft under our house from the front after a massive tree root smashed our main sewer line. Of course none of it was covered. We paid just over $5k to take care of it, plus another $1k to fix the hole they dug in our bathroom to fix this issues.
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Old 06-22-2021, 11:42 AM
 
13 posts, read 6,057 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lewdog_5 View Post
Had to have a trenchless sewer pipe put in, running about 30ft under our house from the front after a massive tree root smashed our main sewer line. Of course none of it was covered. We paid just over $5k to take care of it, plus another $1k to fix the hole they dug in our bathroom to fix this issues.
Your whole pipe? That actually seems not that a bad a price. We had just a few feet replaced. Trenchless sounds like really cool technology!
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Old 06-22-2021, 03:53 PM
 
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That doesn’t seem like a bad price to me either. We had a similar issue and our municipality (Scottsdale) only covers to the sewer tap of course and they don’t offer any type of coverage. We went the trenchless route also and paid approx $9,500 but that including some other plumbing items and an additional kitchen sewer line that needed epoxy lined as well. I would recommend to anyone to check out epoxy lining their sewer lines to see if it’s a possibility (vs the traditional excavation route). It saves a lot of time and headaches in my opinion.
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Old 06-23-2021, 11:09 AM
 
Location: Phoenix Arizona
724 posts, read 1,724,722 times
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Last year we had a broken sewer line that ran underneath our patio. Cost me 3K to have them break up a 6 x 4 foot section of concrete and replace the broken pipe. I opted to pour my own cement after they were done so that saved me some money.
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Old 06-23-2021, 04:09 PM
 
9,438 posts, read 10,897,007 times
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I have a story to tell! Settle in, this is long!

My house was built in 1949 and had cast iron sewer line. Last August I had a leak in my hallway just outside the bathroom (which I discovered by slipping and falling in the water). Plumber came out and found a busted iron pipe in the wall behind the bathroom sink. That portion of pipe was replaced, so I thought that was that. About a week or so later I was doing laundry and water started backing up in my bathroom, overflowing out of my toilet and filling my tub up with sludge. Called the plumbing company back and they cleared a blockage in the sewer line then using their camera gave me the bad news; a portion of the pipe had busted under the patio. The suggested doing the trenchless replacement but gave me an estimate for full replacement as well. (about $12K)

I had a second company come out and they did a more thorough inspection. I was told that trenchless was not an option for me as the pipe had ruptured causing uneven surfaces that would not allow for that. My only option was to replace the entire sewer line from the bathtub to where it met the line to the street (which is in excellent shape thankfully). Part of the pipe runs diagonally under my bathroom and part of it runs under the patio along side the house. This required removing my entire (only) bathroom and jackhammering to access the pipe on the inside, then jackhammering a trench on the outside of the house as well. The total length of the pipe was about 15 feet. My estimate was $11,737. $5694 of it was to access the pipe (the jackhammering and hauling away of debris as well as removing and hauling away all bathroom fixtures) and $6043 for materials and labor to install the new pipe. This did not include the cost to put my (only) bathroom back afterwards.

The plumbing company suggested I call my homeowner's insurance and after a few estimates and inspections, they agreed to pay to access the sewer pipe and replace my bathroom, but they would not pay for the sewer line itself, those are almost never covered by insurance. In addition to the above costs, they also paid $10,480 to replace the bathroom and $1600 to repair the trench in the patio. For those following along, that comes to $23,817.00, with $6043 of that total my responsibility.

Here's the "fun" parts:

First "fun" thing...It took nearly 6 months from the backup and initial inspection to actually getting the work done. This was due to issues with getting inspections done due to covid, waiting for insurance to get back to me, and then, finally waiting for construction materials to be available to do the bathroom replacement. (there's been a huge supply chain issue in the last year due to people being at home and pandemic Remodeling) During that time it was recommended that I do not flush any paper to avoid a new backup. So, for six months from August 19 (the date of the backup) to February 16 (when the work finally started), I did not flush any paper. All of it went in bags. That became so routine that I was afraid to flush paper when I used the bathroom away from home .

Second "fun" thing...the contractor I hired to replace the bathroom was completely worthless. Not showing up on the first scheduled day and several other days, or workers showing up 4 to 5 hours late was a big issue. No communication was another. Remember, I had only one bathroom, so from the day the plumbing company started I had to leave the house every time I needed to use the bathroom. My insurance company did put me and my dogs up in a really nice hotel, but I was in the house during the day when the work was being done, so it was a lot of going back and forth every night to sleep and shower...or even just use the toilet. The whole thing was very stressful with that and having to call every day to see if the contractor was going to show up,etc. It was supposed to take less than 2 weeks to complete the bathroom, which is tiny, only 6X6, but at the end of week 3 they were still not quite done (and insurance was not extending the hotel any further). I finally ended up having to do the final sanding and painting myself.

Third "fun" thing...because I dared to use my insurance, my rates went up...by 150%. they doubled and then added half. They also did the same to my car insurance that was bundled in. My mortgage payment went up $200 a month to cover the new premium. I can't switch because no other insurance company wants me right now. (I was able to switch my car at least) I was able to refinance which did lower my payment but in the end I am paying the same as before because of the insurance cost.

I am tentatively planning to move in a year or so. My first question for any house built before 1980 will be regarding the plumbing. I never want to go through this again!

If you got this far and are interested, I will say the company I hired for the plumbing portion was amazing. Professional, knowledgeable, quick, efficient, and cleaned up after. If anyone wants to know the company name, let me know. And if you want the bathroom contractor as well so you can avoid it, let me know that as well!
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Old 06-23-2021, 04:18 PM
 
2,783 posts, read 1,001,288 times
Reputation: 1845
Such insurance-sewage,gasmwater heater is offered by Homeserve via our utility company.
I got a new water heater after paying $9.99 a month for 4 months
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