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Old 10-07-2008, 02:59 PM
 
214 posts, read 1,238,417 times
Reputation: 129

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Quote:
Originally Posted by DanielleS2008 View Post
I pay about $125 a month JUST FOR WATER.
You have some issues there my friend. Even a plumber call would be money well spent. Unless you own multiple acres of green grass this is 3-4X what I'd expect you to be paying. Start by calling your water company and ask that they review the bill comparing to former residents and neighbors. Then that they come and do a meter inspection. You may be due some money back if it's on them.
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Old 10-07-2008, 03:47 PM
 
16 posts, read 43,127 times
Reputation: 15
Most of our water is ground water and it's not going anywhere...my water bill is bundled in my homeowner's association dues so I never see a bill.
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Old 10-07-2008, 11:15 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
1,627 posts, read 3,861,800 times
Reputation: 1780
Gonna be the voice of dissent here. Phoenix most certainly does suffer from a water shortage. The entire southwest region, does. The fact is, we're in a drought, the lakes continue to shrink every year, and climate studies don't see it getting much better (unless Arizona is going to rely on Monsoonal moisture to recharge it's aquifers, rivers and lakes.)

That water has to come from higher up (as in the mountains), and there's drought up there, too. I mean, come on. I know people are gonna say it's because of the dams, but the mighty, wide Salt River almost never flows unless they let a trickle down from Roosevelt and past the Tempe Town Pond.

The problem I think is that Phoenix is very much in denial about it's water sources and it's water situation (and is not the only thing that Phoenix is in denial about.) Your water bill (for now) remains artificially low, but if the situation is not dealt with (by way of conservation, citizen and government co-operation, and some kind of managed growth policy, whether mandated by the government or volunteer via developers) then Phoenix could become a very bleak place indeed. That many people using that much water in a desert is not sustainable.

I will give credit to the incredible amount of xeriscaping, the canal system, and the efforts of conservationists at trying to create a more sustainable water situation in the city (and in the state.) However I would offer the overall warning that some people failed to see the housing crisis coming...while some saw it coming and just didn't care. The same could be said of Phoenix's water situation.
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Old 10-08-2008, 09:59 AM
 
Location: Phoenix
3,995 posts, read 9,225,090 times
Reputation: 902
Quote:
Originally Posted by zenkonami View Post
Gonna be the voice of dissent here. Phoenix most certainly does suffer from a water shortage. The entire southwest region, does. The fact is, we're in a drought, the lakes continue to shrink every year, and climate studies don't see it getting much better (unless Arizona is going to rely on Monsoonal moisture to recharge it's aquifers, rivers and lakes.)

That water has to come from higher up (as in the mountains), and there's drought up there, too. I mean, come on. I know people are gonna say it's because of the dams, but the mighty, wide Salt River almost never flows unless they let a trickle down from Roosevelt and past the Tempe Town Pond.

The problem I think is that Phoenix is very much in denial about it's water sources and it's water situation (and is not the only thing that Phoenix is in denial about.) Your water bill (for now) remains artificially low, but if the situation is not dealt with (by way of conservation, citizen and government co-operation, and some kind of managed growth policy, whether mandated by the government or volunteer via developers) then Phoenix could become a very bleak place indeed. That many people using that much water in a desert is not sustainable.

I will give credit to the incredible amount of xeriscaping, the canal system, and the efforts of conservationists at trying to create a more sustainable water situation in the city (and in the state.) However I would offer the overall warning that some people failed to see the housing crisis coming...while some saw it coming and just didn't care. The same could be said of Phoenix's water situation.
This is just not true, while the "southwest" and much of rural areas of Arizona have water issues, Phoenix does not. Phoenix actually has a use it or lose it problem. We do not have the storage capacity to keep all the water that reaches the Valley. Now the problem with Arizona is that rural towns and mountain cities, like Prescott and the Prescott Valley, actually are situated in a region where water leaves and moves south and west into Phoenix. Since they are at higher elevation, building a system to pump water back up thousands of feet is unrealistic and this is where the Southwest's water issues are a problem.

Last edited by fcorrales80; 10-08-2008 at 10:34 AM..
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Old 10-08-2008, 09:49 PM
 
101 posts, read 360,742 times
Reputation: 39
Quote:
I've been trying to figure out why my water bill is so high, but have been unsuccessful. I pay about $125 a month JUST FOR WATER. This does not include trash and sewage, which is covered by my HOA fees. I've talked to our water provider about this, done all the checks for leaks, etc.

For those of you who only pay $35 to $65 a month on water, is there any way you can tell me about how many gallons of water you use a month?
Someone else that is having incredibly HIGH water bills??? Glad we're not the only ones. We are averaging about $185 a month for water, sewer and trash pickup!!!! Please tell me that this is ridiculous. We are renting for now and our first month here we got a note from the water company saying that we have been using an unusual amount of water and that we might have a leak. SO, we get it checked out and there was a leak in the pool pump. Got that fixed and the bill is still around $185. There are 2 adults and one child in the house and we are SUPER careful with our water usage on purpose. I don't know what to do...we can't keep having a water bill this high every month is taking it's toll. I'm especially concerned now seeing that everyone's is so low. The owner's bills used to run them around $80 a month and that was with 2 adults. What should we do next??? Is there a way to fight the water company?
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Old 10-09-2008, 02:29 AM
 
Location: United Kingdom
339 posts, read 1,178,645 times
Reputation: 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by smallvillefan View Post
Someone else that is having incredibly HIGH water bills??? Glad we're not the only ones. We are averaging about $185 a month for water, sewer and trash pickup!!!! Please tell me that this is ridiculous. We are renting for now and our first month here we got a note from the water company saying that we have been using an unusual amount of water and that we might have a leak. SO, we get it checked out and there was a leak in the pool pump. Got that fixed and the bill is still around $185. There are 2 adults and one child in the house and we are SUPER careful with our water usage on purpose. I don't know what to do...we can't keep having a water bill this high every month is taking it's toll. I'm especially concerned now seeing that everyone's is so low. The owner's bills used to run them around $80 a month and that was with 2 adults. What should we do next??? Is there a way to fight the water company?
If there was one leak, there may be more. Anyway, can't you switch suppliers?
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Old 10-09-2008, 09:51 AM
 
101 posts, read 360,742 times
Reputation: 39
Quote:
If there was one leak, there may be more. Anyway, can't you switch suppliers?
We had a plumber out to the house and he checked everything out, said that it was definitely coming from the pool. It all had to do with our water usage dial spinning, etc. He showed me what he checked and all of that. As far as switching suppliers I wasn't aware I had a choice. The city of Phoenix provides my water...do we get choices around here??
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Old 10-09-2008, 02:30 PM
 
10 posts, read 37,260 times
Reputation: 12
Default Still no answers....

I've had the water company come out and check to make sure our meter is correct. They came out and said it was working properly.

I also asked to compare against the previous owners, and while they would not give me exact numbers, they did say it was in line. We have about 500 square feet of grass and a drip system in the front and back. There is about 6000 sqare feet in the back yard (not covered by the grass). We have cut back on the watering that the previous owners did (they ran the sprinklers every day - we are 4-5 days a week), but still the bill is $125 a month.

We have also checked for leaks and found none. The meter is not running all of the time, so we are pretty confident there are no leaks.

Any suggestions?
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Old 10-09-2008, 02:47 PM
 
228 posts, read 550,437 times
Reputation: 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by fcorrales80 View Post
This is just not true, while the "southwest" and much of rural areas of Arizona have water issues, Phoenix does not. Phoenix actually has a use it or lose it problem. We do not have the storage capacity to keep all the water that reaches the Valley. Now the problem with Arizona is that rural towns and mountain cities, like Prescott and the Prescott Valley, actually are situated in a region where water leaves and moves south and west into Phoenix. Since they are at higher elevation, building a system to pump water back up thousands of feet is unrealistic and this is where the Southwest's water issues are a problem.

Not right now, it doesn't. But to have confidence that the current levels of the ground aquifers will remain at high enough levels to support unchecked growth in the Valley ad infinitum is naive to put it lightly. The entire southwest is in jeopardy, no part of this region is immune, don't kid yourself. If the Colorado and its tributaries continue to be suffer drought and to be continually sucked dry by ever burgeoning communities, the long term outlook is bad. The situation in the southeast is no less dire, as Lake Lanier's levels continue to drop at alarming rates.

It's been said that water is the oil of the 21st century. Remember that little anecdote 20 years from now when the dust bowl finally hits out here, and real estate values in the midwest are skyrocketing as many folks move back there, superficial lifestyle preferences like the weather no longer withstanding.
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Old 10-11-2008, 08:08 PM
 
Location: Phoenix
3,995 posts, read 9,225,090 times
Reputation: 902
Quote:
Originally Posted by borborygmi View Post
Not right now, it doesn't. But to have confidence that the current levels of the ground aquifers will remain at high enough levels to support unchecked growth in the Valley ad infinitum is naive to put it lightly. The entire southwest is in jeopardy, no part of this region is immune, don't kid yourself. If the Colorado and its tributaries continue to be suffer drought and to be continually sucked dry by ever burgeoning communities, the long term outlook is bad. The situation in the southeast is no less dire, as Lake Lanier's levels continue to drop at alarming rates.

It's been said that water is the oil of the 21st century. Remember that little anecdote 20 years from now when the dust bowl finally hits out here, and real estate values in the midwest are skyrocketing as many folks move back there, superficial lifestyle preferences like the weather no longer withstanding.
Your concerns aren't backed up by facts. You need to read on Phoenix water issues to learn about the water logging and surface water retention problems facing the Valley (too much standing water because of lack of capacity to store it). Phoenix gets about 30 percent of its water from the Colorado. The city receives most of its water from aquifers and in-state rivers and reservoirs that always fill to near capacity even during this "drought." Droughts and desert together sound oxymoronic. However, the Southeast, specifically Atlanta are hurting and is a true example of a major city suffering from a shortage of water.
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