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Old 03-09-2009, 12:02 AM
 
3,791 posts, read 10,727,547 times
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What do you get with a bunch of lumber and a crapload of dirt? Something like this...

It's 15'x3'x18", filled with 56 bags of all natural potting soil. We put in 8 tomato plants, 6 bell pepper plants, then seeds of lettuce, carrots, parsley, basil, dill, chives, and rosemary.











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Old 03-09-2009, 12:51 AM
 
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Too funny - I built a similar planter several weeks ago and laughed at the sight of your bags. A friend planted the idea as a way to save money. I spent more on the dirt than I spend on veggies in a year! But still, it's a fun project. I'm going to guess you might have enthusiastically overbought a few things... tomato plants can get pretty big and will be bumping into everything. But it's all part of the learning process. I've also planted some things that could potentially get huge, depending on when they take off and how they behave when it gets hot.

As an aside, rosemary is a very tough plant and can take a lot of AZ/NV sun - plus can grow into a bush that'll grow for years. You might consider moving it to a place in the yard (with a drip) as part of the permanent landscape, giving you a bit more space in the planter for the seasonal/delicate things. My rosemary plant is on the west side, in native dirt, and grows year round... I snip what I need for cooking but otherwise it tends to itself and is otherwise a green shrub in the permanent landscape.

You'll also need to buy a few poles and add some netting. Certain birds love certain lettuce varieties, which I learned after they ate everything down to the nub. Just stick a pole in each corner then wrap it. A roll or two of netting from Lowes is $7 (or so).

Be sure to give it lots of water to get it going... the above ground/store soils lose moisture quicky and new plants need a lot of juice. Otherwise, happy growing!
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Old 03-09-2009, 10:38 AM
 
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How much water would you recommend? Just once daily?

As for the tomatoes, I did read that they get pretty big but you can prune them back once they start bearing fruit from what I understand...that was all the nutrients and such go to the fruits and not to growing the plant further.
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Old 03-09-2009, 11:37 AM
 
Location: The Circle City. Sometimes NE of Bagdad.
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Pretty cool, I've been thinking about doing something like that. But I really don't think its a good idea to put it up next to the house like that thou.

Good sturdy design.
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Old 03-09-2009, 11:45 AM
 
Location: Gilbert, AZ
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Awesome! I have made a garden in my backyard, but nothing as neat as yours!
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Old 03-09-2009, 12:01 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by motormaker View Post
But I really don't think its a good idea to put it up next to the house like that thou.
How come?
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Old 03-09-2009, 12:26 PM
 
Location: The Circle City. Sometimes NE of Bagdad.
20,258 posts, read 20,998,581 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HX_Guy View Post
How come?
Well here's my thoughts.

1 If and when you go to paint the house you have to move it or not paint behind it.

2. Washing windows could be a problem.

3. Moisture will get trapped between the wood and mudsill creating endless possibilities.

4. Overtime, the wood will end up with termites.

5. From past experience, reaching over the front to pick/prune/weed towards the side against the house can be a pain. In other words, my planters were to wide.

Please don't get me wrong because I think it's a great idea, but I think I would have put it up against the fence. Just my thoughts.

Good luck, and wishing you a successful crop.
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Old 03-09-2009, 01:55 PM
 
Location: Out there somewhere...a traveling man.
41,055 posts, read 51,652,875 times
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First let me congratulate you on the great job you did with your project. To answer your question about watering. Since you went to all that trouble and expense, I'd pick up a $5-7.00 moisture meter at the Garden Center. Tomatos need to be kept moist but not overwatered. Right now in AZ deserts probably evey 3- 5 days watering depending on sun location and permeable soil. The moisture meter will tell you exactly when to water taking in the factors of soil density and the suns various positions.
Now for the bad news. Wrong location. You are doing as stated above by motormaker, next to the house creating an environment for fungus, mildews, bugs, termite infestation, rotting of the house behind the stucco, and a host of other problems. Ideally the planter should be evenly spaced between the fence and house for correct air circulation. Next best would be near the fence.
I also would have used a liner inside to protect the wood and make it last longer.
My opinions.
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Old 03-09-2009, 02:21 PM
 
Location: The Circle City. Sometimes NE of Bagdad.
20,258 posts, read 20,998,581 times
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Great idea on the liner Nitram, dang, why didn't I think of that.
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Old 03-09-2009, 02:41 PM
 
1,170 posts, read 4,824,124 times
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Here's a link to tomato growing tips. All the tips don't apply equally to everyplace, but overwatering is probably one of the biggest mistakes.

Heirloom Tomatoes of Texas - Growin' Tips (http://www.heirloomtomatoesoftexas.com/growintips.asp - broken link)
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