Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Arizona > Phoenix area
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-15-2009, 11:29 PM
 
3,819 posts, read 11,887,407 times
Reputation: 2747

Advertisements

Im wanting to planet a new tree and have a couple questions...

First, what do you guys recommend?

This is what I want (or don't want):

• Not a desert tree
• Something that has the lowest part of the crown at least 6-7 feet tall, so it's above the fence line
• Fast growing
• No multi trunk trees, I want a tree that look like a tree, not an overgrown bush
• Something with real leaves...not thornes or itty bitty leaves
• Leaning toward evergreen...but maybe could go with something that loses its leaves in the winter

I'm leaning toward a Ficus...but I've already got 2 in the backyard and was thinking mix it up a bit, just not really sure with that. I really really like the Ficus, they are a great shade of green, very dense, and very "tree looking".

Second, how bad is it to plant in the summer? Or does it depend more on the type of tree? I'm thinking March is probably the best time, but I don't want to wait until then.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-15-2009, 11:55 PM
 
919 posts, read 3,382,741 times
Reputation: 585
- Shamel Ash
Loves the heat, grows pretty fast, crown can be high - so you can see through it at eye level. Looks like a ficus but is more hardy. They grow for decades and get huge. Mine is 5 years and is somewhat big... but 10 years from now whomever lives in the house will love the shade. It will keep the summer sun off the house for hours. Also, it drops all leaves in winter. Some folks might not like this, but I want the sun on the house in colder months.

Chinese Tallow
These are considered invasive in some states but I doubt they'll spread here unless you live near a creek. Also tall, fast growing, love the heat. It has grown bigger and faster than the Ash in the first years, but the Ash will be bigger. It also loses its leaves in winter, but they turn gold, then red before falling. Reminds me of Aspen trees.

Chinese Pistache
Another I planted to shade the house... on the West side. It's fine with heat - just run the hose at the base from time to time. They also get huge - in time. In fall, the leaves turn a brillaint red. In 20 years this will be a massive tree providing beautiful shade. For an advance look, go to Baker's nursery on 40th St. north of Thomas... their whole outdoor area is shaded by a massive Pistache.

Copy/Paste these tree names into google and do an image search. There are other good choices as well... it simply depends on your exposure, water, etc. These simply worked for me.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-15-2009, 11:58 PM
 
Location: Phoenix
3,995 posts, read 9,978,706 times
Reputation: 905
I'd go with an Alpeeno Pine or maybe one of those Salt River Oak trees. When I went to the Desert Botanical Gardens, I saw this huge, leafy, oak that is native to Phoenix and the Salt River Valley but isn't one of those overgrown "bush" trees like the ironwood or palo verde. The oak at the DBG was HUGE, I mean, HUGE but was old as well, so a younger tree wouldn't be as massive. I think they grow fast with irrigation and my grandmother's house has two of then that shade the west and east sides of her house, at least it looked like the oak from the DBG. I took a leaf to compare and they look the same. I'm no botanist however. LOL
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-16-2009, 12:15 AM
 
3,819 posts, read 11,887,407 times
Reputation: 2747
Quote:
Originally Posted by joninaz View Post
- Shamel Ash
Loves the heat, grows pretty fast, crown can be high - so you can see through it at eye level. Looks like a ficus but is more hardy. They grow for decades and get huge. Mine is 5 years and is somewhat big... but 10 years from now whomever lives in the house will love the shade. It will keep the summer sun off the house for hours. Also, it drops all leaves in winter. Some folks might not like this, but I want the sun on the house in colder months.
I was just looking at the Shamel Ash online, it could be a good choice. I love how it looks, like a typical park tree.



Exposure wise, it's going to be sort of in the middle of the yard (right about where the blue pool float is in the picture, in front of the pool desk), so it's going to be full sun at all times.



Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-16-2009, 12:18 AM
 
Location: Phoenix
3,995 posts, read 9,978,706 times
Reputation: 905
I LOVE your backyard!!! A big shade tree in the middle would be fabulous! ahhh, its 10:18, must go work out...let us know what tree you decided on, might give me some ideas!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-16-2009, 12:44 AM
 
Location: somewhere close to Tampa, but closer to the beach
2,035 posts, read 5,020,394 times
Reputation: 1099
Here are a few Sub tropicals you might look into which love the low desert areas of AZ. such as the Phoenix area..

For spring flower displays,..both the Golden Trumpet tree (Tabebuia chrysotricha) and the pink flowering version (Tabebuia impetiginosa) are unsurpassed for incredible displays just as the weather begins to warm in early spring..Both stay between 20-30ft tall with the golden species staying smaller..it also makes a teriffic street tree as it generally is not greedy or invasive..Both of these can take temps. down to at least 24 or 23.. The only issue might be both species shedding alot their leaves just as it starts flowering..I personally like this because you get to ooh and awe at the flower display more..and it is certainly a traffic stopper..

Summer flower-ers include both the Gold Medallion tree (Cassia leptophylla) and the Golden Shower tree.. (Cassia fistula) i was surprised to hear that this one was growing sucessfully there since it is slightly more tender then the other species mentioned..Then again, there are increasing reports of both Royal Poinciana and African tulip trees being grown there..(you're lucky too!!)

Both of these cassia species produce yellow flowers and while im not certain about the Fistula, the other species is evergreen with maybe a small amount of leaf drop in mid spring..i have one planted up here in san Jose and have had no issues with it..just trying to get it to flower more..it is still kind of young..even so, the foliage is also attractive..

The Hong Kong Orchid tree is a beautifull, clean version of the always messy Purple Orchid tree..and it's flowers are spectacular..and smell wonderfull up close..they can be up to 7" across as well

Tipu tree is another ferny-leaved tree worth looking into..as is Jacaranda..

The before mentioned Chinese Pistache is great if you are looking for Autumn color displays..choose only male trees because female trees produce loads of tiny fruit..and pollen filled flowers..

The trees to stay away from are most which come from northern or cooler areas simply because they often stress much more easily in the desert heat..Also avoid trees like She oak or tamirisk..a nasty invader in alot of the desert S.w., especially along the Colorado River basin..Both of these really don't look all that great to start with..

One word of warning about the Shamel ash, while they make great shade trees, they drop endless amounts of seeds..I had a customer who had so many seedlings constantly appear in their yard that they tore out everything and started from scratch...after sterilizing the soil..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-16-2009, 12:57 AM
 
Location: Metro Phoenix, AZ USA
17,914 posts, read 43,187,779 times
Reputation: 10719
Aleppo pines are messy. Shamel ash would work, or a live oak (it may be the same as what fc is calling a Salt River oak. I've seen them at Desert Winds and Whitfills.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-16-2009, 01:01 AM
 
3,819 posts, read 11,887,407 times
Reputation: 2747
Yea Im not into the pine trees, I dont think it would really match the back yard. Not really into the flowering trees...just really want a classic looking park type tree, big leaves, tall, nice round crown and a nice deep green color.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-16-2009, 01:16 AM
 
3,819 posts, read 11,887,407 times
Reputation: 2747
I think Im leaning toward an Ash tree now thought not sure which variety.

I don't like the Arizona Ash as it grows taller then it does wider, which is not what I want. I prefer something that is more oval or round, but not taller then wider.

The Fan-Tex Ash seems to fit the need, but it's not as big. The last one is the Shamel Ash but I havent found how that one grows compared to the other two.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-16-2009, 01:37 AM
 
Location: Phoenix
3,995 posts, read 9,978,706 times
Reputation: 905
Quote:
Originally Posted by HX_Guy View Post
I think Im leaning toward an Ash tree now thought not sure which variety.

I don't like the Arizona Ash as it grows taller then it does wider, which is not what I want. I prefer something that is more oval or round, but not taller then wider.

The Fan-Tex Ash seems to fit the need, but it's not as big. The last one is the Shamel Ash but I havent found how that one grows compared to the other two.
After seeing your yard, a pine would NOT work in your yard, LOL! I haven't seen a Fan Ash, hmmmm. I do love the oak, but it might be too big for what you want but has a great big and wide crown. Oh, and I was told that another big crown tree in my grandmother's yard is the cottonwood. In the Yaple Historic neighborhood in Phoenix, alpenno pines are VERY tall and don't seem too messy, but would look out of place in your yard or mine with the palms. I was told the Desert Museum Palo Verde is a larger, big crown version of the typical palo verde; still, you don't get the big leaves that are on your list. But can anyone verify the "Desert Museum Palo Verde" as being a big crown shade tree? I might be interested in it if it were true.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Arizona > Phoenix area

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top