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Old 11-14-2009, 06:28 PM
 
Location: phila
12 posts, read 69,055 times
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We are looking at a house in Fountain Hills that we really like the only problem is it has a diving pool. We were thinking we could fill it in to make it only 6 ft deep. Does anyone know if this is feasible? Would we have to just redo the whole thing? Cost wise, what would be the best way to go.

Thaniks
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Old 11-14-2009, 07:30 PM
 
Location: Phoenix
3,995 posts, read 9,383,087 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by liberty413 View Post
We are looking at a house in Fountain Hills that we really like the only problem is it has a diving pool. We were thinking we could fill it in to make it only 6 ft deep. Does anyone know if this is feasible? Would we have to just redo the whole thing? Cost wise, what would be the best way to go.

Thaniks
AH! NOOOOOO! LOL, just my opinion but this would be rather unwise. Diving pools are much more valuable especially in that neighborhood. They are much more expensive compared to a play pool and do not warm up in the summer like play pools. But, I've never heard if it is possible to convert a diving pool to a play pool. I'd call a few pool builders just to find out.
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Old 11-14-2009, 07:40 PM
 
11,294 posts, read 19,244,492 times
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Yes, it's absolutely feasible and done all the time. Any decent pool remodeling company can do it. They build up the bottom and reshape it and extend the pipes. I would make it 5' deep, not 6'. Why? Because an adult can walk across it that way which makes it a whole lot safer if you're supervising young children in it. With a shallow pool, you can have a very gentle slope in it as well. You'll save money on heating it and chemicals too. It's also easier to keep clean.
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Old 11-14-2009, 07:50 PM
 
Location: Phoenix
3,995 posts, read 9,383,087 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kdog View Post
Yes, it's absolutely feasible and done all the time. Any decent pool remodeling company can do it. They build up the bottom and reshape it and extend the pipes. I would make it 5' deep, not 6'. Why? Because an adult can walk across it that way which makes it a whole lot safer if you're supervising young children in it. With a shallow pool, you can have a very gentle slope in it as well. You'll save money on heating it and chemicals too. It's also easier to keep clean.
Boo, you're not a true Arizonan are you! LOL

But I'm sure what you say about maintenance is true. However, when I'm invited to "pool" parties and end up at one with a play pool, I jokingly refuse to "swim" in it because, "I don't do 'splash pads!'" LOL

I remember visiting my family when younger, and playing games where one had to dive to retrieve submerged items from the 12 foot end of the pool, it was great. Now all these people have pools where the danger lies in smacking your head, toes, limbs on the bottom of the pool! Ouch, and remember, it is just as easy for kids to drown in a tub or 3 feet of water as it is in 12 feet and in fact it happens in shallow water more often. It is easier to swim to a drowning victim than to "walk over" to a drowning victim; reference survival training in the military and I was a life guard much of my youth years.
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Old 11-14-2009, 08:20 PM
 
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Sorry, but you're more likely to be injured in a deep residential pool because of the steep transition necessary to go from a very deep end to a shallow one for any reasonable length pool. People run into the steep transition and break their neck. A shallow pool has a more gradual slope which is safer for a variety of reasons. Your implication that people are more likely to drown in a shallow pool than a deeper one is laughable. The only reason kids drown more often in shallow water is because they're more likely to be in shallow water. You actually think there's something about shallow water that drags kids under or something? No, I don't you do. You're just being argumentative. As far as swimming goes, it matters not if you're swimming in water a few feet deep or 20'. You won't know the difference. The fact is, that the trend these days in swimming pools is a no-diving, shallow pool. Ask any pool builder.
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Old 11-14-2009, 08:33 PM
 
Location: Phoenix
3,995 posts, read 9,383,087 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kdog View Post
Sorry, but you're more likely to be injured in a deep residential pool because of the steep transition necessary to go from a very deep end to a shallow one for any reasonable length pool. People run into the steep transition and break their neck. A shallow pool has a more gradual slope which is safer for a variety of reasons. Your implication that people are more likely to drown in a shallow pool than a deeper one is laughable. The only reason kids drown more often in shallow water is because they're more likely to be in shallow water. You actually think there's something about shallow water that drags kids under or something? No, I don't you do. You're just being argumentative. As far as swimming goes, it matters not if you're swimming in water a few feet deep or 20'. You won't know the difference. The fact is, that the trend these days in swimming pools is a no-diving, shallow pool. Ask any pool builder.
No, your likely to suffer neck and head injuries in a shallow play pool, because well its shallow and more people smack their heads in a shallow pool. You'd have to be swimming extremely fast to break your neck in a transition slope; maybe a dolphin pulling you into the transition? Although, I don't think there is enough room for such an accident.

No, it's not that kids are pulled into shallow pools by some force, but the complacency of parents or supervising adults in shallow water leads to more drowning accidents in such an environment. "It's not that deep, so I thought it wasn't as dangerous!" Is common to hear...

Who cares what pool builders say, diving pools are the best! The reason shallow pools are a "trend" is because everyone and their dog wants one even if they truly cannot afford a pool.
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Old 11-14-2009, 08:45 PM
 
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We want to do the opposite and change our play pool to a diving pool. Maybe it would be easier if we switch residences and keep the pools the same!
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Old 11-14-2009, 08:59 PM
 
Location: Phoenix
2,897 posts, read 9,714,838 times
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You can do it, but it's going to bring down the value of the pool. Diving pools are great, even for kids, just teach them to swim.
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Old 11-14-2009, 09:20 PM
 
11,294 posts, read 19,244,492 times
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Originally Posted by fcorrales80 View Post
No, your likely to suffer neck and head injuries in a shallow play pool, because well its shallow and more people smack their heads in a shallow pool. You'd have to be swimming extremely fast to break your neck in a transition slope; maybe a dolphin pulling you into the transition? Although, I don't think there is enough room for such an accident.
Shallow pools are no-diving pools. No diving equals no neck injury. Get it?

As far as the threat from the transition slope goes, here's a quote for you:

"8. No diving boards on residential pools: Young athletic swimmers can easily strike the transition slope when diving off a board in a residential pool. Removing it will prevent injury." Reference: Aquatic Injuries, Broken Necks – Swimming Pool Accidents

Notice they didn't say "hit bottom". They said "strike the transition slope". That is where the real danger lies, despite your uninformed opinions.
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Old 11-14-2009, 09:28 PM
 
Location: Phoenix
3,995 posts, read 9,383,087 times
Reputation: 902
Quote:
Originally Posted by kdog View Post
Shallow pools are no-diving pools. No diving equals no neck injury. Get it?

As far as the threat from the transition slope goes, here's a quote for you:

"8. No diving boards on residential pools: Young athletic swimmers can easily strike the transition slope when diving off a board in a residential pool. Removing it will prevent injury." Reference: Aquatic Injuries, Broken Necks – Swimming Pool Accidents

Notice they didn't say "hit bottom". They said "strike the transition slope". That is where the real danger lies, despite your uninformed opinions.
This doesn't say anything about diving pools v play pools. The fact remains that many people DO dive into play pools not realizing the bottom is closer than they predict, thus smacking their heads and leading to injury. I've seen it many times and often in shallow ends and shallow pools. Sorry if you think my opinion is uninformed, but it's not.
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