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Old 09-27-2012, 07:23 AM
 
89 posts, read 120,240 times
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Rabbit butchering plan has some hopping mad - Post-Gazette

After reading that article, I feel a little confused. I feel like most animal activists are usually in favor of free-range farms that butcher their animals humanely. In this particular instance, it seems that because the animal in question that is due to be eaten is cuter than your average farm animal (chicken, cow, etc.), the farm is evil.

Is there something I'm missing? I mean, there are kids all over the country who live on farms and butcher animals. I don't feel that exposing kids to this sort of thing is inherently evil, or harmful just because they live in the city. It actually makes a lot of sense to me to have an outlet, within the city, where you can get your food locally, and even learn about the process. This is coming from someone who has had pet rabbits, and was a vegetarian for 10 years. What this farm wants to do is really awesome, I think.

And really, a rabbit activist actually saying, "Rabbits should be pets, not dinner" is ridiculous to me. Rabbits should be pets? Really, activist?

Last edited by PittsburghLlama; 09-27-2012 at 08:31 AM..
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Old 09-27-2012, 07:34 AM
 
Location: Charlotte
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"Lapin à la moutarde" - Yummy! I see nothing wrong with raising rabbits for food. If you are a vegetarian, you don't have to eat them.
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Old 09-27-2012, 07:34 AM
 
43,012 posts, read 98,135,386 times
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I was a vegetarian for 35 years. I now eat small amounts of meat for health reasons. I have always supported hunting for food, not sport. As a result, I have no problem with someone raising animals for food. I acknowledge animals have purposes, and I strongly believe they should be treated humanely in pursuit of utilizing them for those purposes. A workshop like this one supports my beliefs because it teaches people how to properly butcher rabbits for food. Without this workship, I can only imagine how some people might go about it! Some animal rights activists are nuts and only hurt the cause.
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Old 09-27-2012, 07:56 AM
 
Location: Troy Hill, The Pitt
1,179 posts, read 1,437,994 times
Reputation: 1080
Quote:
Originally Posted by PittsburghLlama View Post
Rabbit butchering plan has some hopping mad - Post-Gazette

After reading that article, I feel a little confused. I feel like most animal activists are usually in favor of free-range farms that butcher their animals humanely. In this particular instance, it seems that because the animal in question that is due to be eaten is cuter than your average farm animal (chicken, cow, etc.), the farm is evil.

Is there something I'm missing? I mean, there are kids all over the country who live on farms and butcher animals. I don't feel that exposing kids to this sort of thing is inherently evil, or harmful just because they live in the city. It actually makes a lot of sense to me to have an outlet, within the city, where you can get your food locally, and even learn you about the process. This is coming from someone who has had pet rabbits, and was a vegetarian for 10 years. What this farm wants to do is really awesome, I think.

And really, a rabbit activist actually saying, "Rabbits should be pets, not dinner" is ridiculous to me. Rabbits should be pets? Really, activist?

Sounds like idealistic jerks who want to impose themselves on everyone else because they can't stomach the fact that things have to die to be eaten. I spent a great deal of my childhood on my grandparents farm. There's nothing wrong with exposing children to the fact that the food they eat has to die. I know that sounds harsh for those who grew up in the city of the burbs and find it to be a foreign concept, but acknowledge for a moment the fact that throughout the course of human history (as well as the present) any kid growing up in an agricultural environment was exposed to it.

Nothing wrong with a workshop showing how to properly/humanely butcher animals nor is there with raising your own animals for food. Nothing wrong with being a vegetarian/vegan if that's what you choose to do either, but don't apply your views that are likely the result of being sheltered from the reality of where your food comes from to others.

Granted, I wouldn't take a four year old to watch bugs get his lights turned off, but 8 or 9 year olds should be able to process that kind of information. If they decide that they can't stomach the thought of eating meat after the fact I applaud that decision. Its more responsible and honest than what everyone else does.
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Old 09-27-2012, 08:20 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh area
9,918 posts, read 22,048,152 times
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I didn't realize there was this much controversy about rabbit, but I guess it makes sense. Rabbits have become a sort of crossover between pets and food, and the way we keep rabbits as pets has changed somewhat as well I think (many people keep them loose in the house, litter pan trained like a cat, that sort of thing). I don't really know but I didn't gather the rabbits that are raised for food are the same breed as the ones kept as pets. I might be wrong about that though. I haven't gone looking for a definitive answer.

Any animal commonly raised for food can be kept as a pet by someone. Most cows or sheep or chickens or whatever aren't commonly kept as pets but that doesn't mean people don't care about the animals. I am not a vegetarian but I live with one. We've also volunteered at Animal Friends where they do take in pet rabbits. I don't think she would care to see such a demonstration, and I personally wouldn't care to eat rabbit, but I don't think we have a problem with what they are doing here. I have fed commercially produced food made from rabbit to my cat before and would consider buying rabbit meat for that purpose, the more local the better.

I suppose it's possible that our overall cultural views on rabbit will shift further towards them not being food. There are some places where cats and/or dogs are still sometimes used as food, and it seems like what has happened there is there has been some overall shift in views over time that are marginalizing the idea that those animals can be used as food.

Last edited by greg42; 09-27-2012 at 08:28 AM..
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Old 09-27-2012, 08:47 AM
 
89 posts, read 120,240 times
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I think that, unless there's a drastic environmental change, rabbits will be more commonly found outdoors than in homes as pets. I know that the majority of people don't eat rabbit like they would beef or chicken (I've never had rabbit), but there are still plenty of rabbits living in the wild in the U.S., as opposed to cats and dogs (at least those of domesticated pet stature). And I think if cats and dogs (ones that look like our pets) were still found in our forests, we'd probably be hunting and eating them.

From my experience, most animal rights activists prefer animals to be free, in the wild. Stating that they should be pets seems kind of backward in that regard.

And I believe you're right, I don't think that domesticated lop-eared pet rabbits are the same used in rabbit dishes served in restaurants and stews, haha, but I could be wrong. And I guess, if we're being logical, it probably doesn't matter if those rabbits are used. The only difference, I think, is the way they look on the outside. I'm sure they're all generally the same once you get past the color of their fur.

Anyway, it was just so surprising to me to see people actually protesting a local urban farm. Of all things to be against in a city, hahaha.
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Old 09-27-2012, 10:44 AM
 
1,714 posts, read 2,091,012 times
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Yeah, I wouldn't want to attend this myself but they're called "Urban Farms," not Urban Nature Preserves.

Last edited by SammyKhalifa; 09-27-2012 at 10:53 AM..
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Old 09-27-2012, 11:43 AM
 
Location: Troy Hill, The Pitt
1,179 posts, read 1,437,994 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greg42 View Post
I suppose it's possible that our overall cultural views on rabbit will shift further towards them not being food. There are some places where cats and/or dogs are still sometimes used as food, and it seems like what has happened there is there has been some overall shift in views over time that are marginalizing the idea that those animals can be used as food.
Rabbit is good. Has a gamey taste like most 'wild' animals, and the little bones can be troublesome to pick through, but its otherwise very nice in stews.

I've never heard of people who have eaten dog referring to it in a pleasant matter. I think the fat is supposedly really distasteful. If someone wants or is forced to eat it though its really none of my business.
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Old 09-27-2012, 11:46 AM
 
Location: Staten Island, NY
6,478 posts, read 6,618,292 times
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Rabbit has too many small bones for my taste, but whatever floats yer boat.

How else should the rabbits die? Should we hire people to tell 'em sad stories until they get depressed and commit suicide?
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Old 09-27-2012, 11:52 AM
 
733 posts, read 881,912 times
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Originally Posted by SammyKhalifa View Post
Yeah, I wouldn't want to attend this myself but they're called "Urban Farms," not Urban Nature Preserves.
Oh man, this story would be sooooo awesome if they were calling this place an Urban Nature Preserve and then advertised rabbit butchering classes, hahaha.
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