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Old 01-21-2013, 04:26 PM
 
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I wanted to get some thoughts on the employment problem we have in our city. It has been building over the years, but it seems that we have tons of highly educated people, professionals and MBA's (due to the abundance of local universities)but the city doesn't have enough middle to upper level jobs to support them. Therefore, I am seeing many leave the city for the careers they were trained for, rather than be underemployed here. And then I am seeing some stay here because they are scared to leave, and taking a sub par position to do so.

I believe our employment reports don't reflect this problem. Any city can report great jobs numbers/low unemployment, but they never report on the qualitative data.
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Old 01-21-2013, 04:48 PM
 
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Originally Posted by BPPT232 View Post
but it seems that we have tons of highly educated people, professionals and MBA's (due to the abundance of local universities) but the city doesn't have enough middle to upper level jobs to support them.
This is due to a national business model trend towards the functional organization chart. It has minimal middle management. It makes it super difficult for lower level managers to move up. It's a darn shame this trend is popular. Companies are demanding education for entry level positions but provide few opportunities for advancement.

It creates resentment within the organization. Younger workers get frustrated and hold contempt for older workers they view as in their way. Sadly, the way to move up is when someone retires or dies, especially during a recession when companies have little growth. It's always been that way, even with other organizational structures that had middle management, but at least there were more opportunities for advancement simply because the positions exist.

You're right about the universities producing more than what's available in the region, but that's not a bad thing. It's great for area businesses because they have their pick of employees. The rest of the graduates will have to settle for lower level positions if they're not interested in relocating from the region. I think our low cost of living keeps them here, not fear, because it's easy to live a comfortable life in Pittsburgh.
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Old 01-21-2013, 04:58 PM
 
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1. No City can ingest all or even an overwhelming majority of their Graduating Student Population. Pittsburgh is however retaining a lot more than it did back in the 80 and 90's when the overwhelming majority left the region.

2. We're now living in an upwardly mobile society, technology has made so that one can move across the country rather easily and still be connected back home. Not to mention Jobs themselves are increasingly more mobile especially the one of middle and upper incomes.

3. No City in this Mobile age is going to be a one stop shop for every job and every industry, which it part feeds the Mobility age in which we live.

I would say the fact the labor force of the region keeps growing significantly while Unemployment level have remained pretty much contained and in some instances shrinking, is a Very Good Sign of the Pittsburgh labor market.
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Old 01-21-2013, 05:08 PM
 
Location: North Oakland
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Originally Posted by Blackbeauty212 View Post
We're now living in an upwardly mobile society, technology has made so that one can move across the country rather easily and still be connected back home.
"Upwardly mobile" doesn't necessarily have anything to do with literally moving across the country. And the USA was probably (I'll leave the numbers to the statisticians) a more upwardly mobile society in the past than it is today.
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Old 01-21-2013, 05:52 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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I think you're wrong, in large part because a huge proportion of the younger professional (under 35, with graduate degrees) cadre in Pittsburgh are people who relocated here for work. If the local job market for professionals was so bad, you wouldn't expect to see so many younger people finding positions here.

If anything, I'd say that Pittsburgh's problem is there are not enough jobs for the non-highly qualified. This is one of the notable reasons we don't have many low-wage immigrants, for example - jobs are so thin on the ground that poor native-born whites and blacks take positions which elsewhere would be disproportionately staffed by recent Asian and Latino migrants. Indeed, virtually everyone who moves here (discounting perhaps people from the small towns outside of Pittsburgh who move here to be "in the big city") seems to be a middle-to-upper-middle class professional.
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Old 01-21-2013, 06:02 PM
 
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Originally Posted by jay5835 View Post
"Upwardly mobile" doesn't necessarily have anything to do with literally moving across the country. And the USA was probably (I'll leave the numbers to the statisticians) a more upwardly mobile society in the past than it is today.
No doesn't necessarily have to do with moving across the country but it is an valid example, where as 20/30 years ago people didn't move out of their own Counties let alone to another city because it wasn't made as easily......but today because of how Technology as been integrated into everyday society it is far more easy and realistic to be mobile. Both in terms of People and Companies.

No longer does a company need to have all its operations located in one central city/location. You couldn't say that 15/20 years ago, nor was there the resources to make that possible as least financially.
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Old 01-21-2013, 06:17 PM
 
Location: North Oakland
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Originally Posted by Blackbeauty212 View Post
No doesn't necessarily have to do with moving across the country but it is an valid example, where as 20/30 years ago people didn't move out of their own Counties let alone to another city because it wasn't made as easily......but today because of how Technology as been integrated into everyday society it is far more easy and realistic to be mobile. Both in terms of People and Companies.

No longer does a company need to have all its operations located in one central city/location. You couldn't say that 15/20 years ago, nor was there the resources to make that possible as least financially.
Again, you're not talking about "upward mobility," which has to do with class jumping, not coast jumping (though class jumping can include coast jumping, and vice versa).
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Old 01-21-2013, 06:20 PM
 
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I'm visiting the area where I used to live, Tampa, FL, and what I notice most as a difference is the number of small retail businesses here compared to Pittsburgh. They are very plentiful here.

Why is there such a vast difference in the number of small businesses?
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Old 01-21-2013, 08:08 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Goinback2011 View Post
I'm visiting the area where I used to live, Tampa, FL, and what I notice most as a difference is the number of small retail businesses here compared to Pittsburgh. They are very plentiful here.

Why is there such a vast difference in the number of small businesses?
Agreed. Florida has a great business model and I feel they are a great leader going forward, low corporate taxes, no state income tax, plus a much more attractive place to reside. Pittsburgh is still under the stranglehold of the big business/public sector union mentality. It's not an innovative city, and tax dollars do not flow into projects to better the city and create new marketplaces for small business. Transportation in the city and sorrounding areas is pretty horrible, and this greatly restricts a customer base for small comanies. Heck, most in this city won't even visit a place if they have to cross a bridge!

And regarding cost of living, Pittsburgh isn't as cheap as it used to be.. Transportation costs are the 2nd highest in the nation, Property Taxes are through the roof and climbing in Allegheny county, and again, we pay 3.07% just in State income taxes, plus sales taxes.
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Old 01-21-2013, 08:20 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
90,377 posts, read 112,092,307 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackbeauty212 View Post
No doesn't necessarily have to do with moving across the country but it is an valid example, where as 20/30 years ago people didn't move out of their own Counties let alone to another city because it wasn't made as easily......but today because of how Technology as been integrated into everyday society it is far more easy and realistic to be mobile. Both in terms of People and Companies.

No longer does a company need to have all its operations located in one central city/location. You couldn't say that 15/20 years ago, nor was there the resources to make that possible as least financially.
Oh, for Pity's sake! You must be very young, to talk about 20-30 years ago as if it were the Dark Ages. College students have always relocated, especially graduates in engineering, medicine (to do their residencies), finance, fields such as this. DH was a "late bloomer" (spent a lot of time in grad school, in other words) and he relocated 30+ years ago.
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