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Old 03-19-2024, 01:30 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh/Anchorage
369 posts, read 462,596 times
Reputation: 361

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The exodus continues. Allegheny Co lost a projected 7,780 residents from July '22 to July '23 per the US Census Bureau.

https://www.census.gov/newsroom/pres...ains-2023.html
Table 4

This makes Allegheny Co the 8th largest for population loss in the US in terms of raw numbers, and 5th largest on a percentage basis among major metro areas.

The Pittsburgh MSA is one of the few that has not recovered COVID job and population loss.
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Old 03-19-2024, 05:50 PM
 
Location: Western PA
10,811 posts, read 4,506,581 times
Reputation: 6664
is this decline in AC spread equally across the county, or concentrated in pittsburgh and its close by neighborhoods?
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Old 03-19-2024, 07:40 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh/Anchorage
369 posts, read 462,596 times
Reputation: 361
Quote:
Originally Posted by SteelCityRising View Post
Craziaskowboi and Eschaton will both be along soon to say the problem is that we have too many Boomers, and Boomers won't stop dropping dead or moving to Boca. Meanwhile demographers have been using the "Pittsburgh has too many old people dying or moving to Boca" excuse since the '90's now, and I'm tired of that STILL being the excuse in 2024. When will we finally reach the point in time when we can return to SLOW population growth and stop using "too many old people" as an excuse? In 2050 when we Millennials are finally graying and dying off in droves? I live in a city neighborhood that has been declining. I work in a city neighborhood that has been declining. I'm very depressed living in Pittsburgh right now, especially when we have a mayor who has been in office now for over two years and who has done nothing to right the ship. I just wish someone could give me a Pittsburgh pep talk, but nobody can.

Those that follow this issue in the local media are probably familiar with Chris Briem, an economist at PITT whom is often called upon to comment on this topic. I had my doubts about him, specifically his lack of ability to acknowledge an outmigration problem in the region due to lack of jobs and opportunity, which in turn is caused by the business, regulatory, and tax climate in the state as well as city.

But now I have no doubt he is nothing but a shill for the progressive democrats that have put this region in the predicament it is in today. Here's a great article from the P-G, and a quote from Mr. Briem:


"A lot of folks get very upset about this. But a lot of this is baked in — it's been baked in for decades,” said Chris Briem, a regional economist at the University of Pittsburgh’s Center for Social and Urban Research.

While the trend is significant for the region, experts caution that the county's shrinking population is part of an ongoing demographic change, not a sudden mass exodus.

In addition, Mr. Briem pointed to the county’s aging population as a driving force of the ongoing shrinkage. Consider: Allegheny County saw more than 1,700 deaths than births this year, the new data shows.

“You can't get around the fact that being an older region, we suffer from natural population decline. It's not something you can change,” Mr. Briem said.
"


No Mr. Briem, what is baked in is the political landscape of this region that has led to its decline for 5 decades now.

And, yes, you CAN change from being an older region by attracting younger people via attracting new businesses and immigration from outside the region via sensible economic and political policies. From the same article:


"nearly 6,000 residents migrated away from the county last year, which indicates a lack of economic opportunity in the area, local experts say."

So this idiot only talks about the 1,700 difference between deaths and births yet ignores the 6,000 net folks that left the region.

How much longer are we gonna talk about the 1970's?!?!?


And then there's this gem of a quote from this clown:
“There's not a whole lot of net population growth out there. And for what there is, it’s concentrating in these South, Midwest, Southwest and Northwest regions,” said Mr. Mallach."

In other words, there's growth in literally every corner of the country overall except the Northeast (including us).


https://www.post-gazette.com/local/r...s/202403130091


The article goes on to provide analysis from the Allegheny Institute, which nails it:


“When you look at the large employers in Allegheny County, you're left with the universities and the government. And they're not drawers for people living in other states,” said Frank Gamrat, the executive director of the Allegheny Institute for Public Policy, a conservative think tank focused on regional development.

Mr. Gamrat said Pittsburgh’s politicians need to take a much more business-friendly approach to economic policy, such as lowering the corporate net income tax rate and conducting more frequent property reassessments.

He cited South Carolina, which has seen a 15% increase in employment since 2019, as a state whose economic policies are cited by experts as reasons for the state's explosive growth.

“Your population is what fuels your labor force. And when the labor force starts to decline, so does the economic engine of the area,” he said.
"

Last edited by PITairport; 03-19-2024 at 08:16 PM..
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Old 03-20-2024, 07:55 AM
 
1,952 posts, read 1,129,168 times
Reputation: 736
Yeah we moved here 16 years ago now, my mother moved back 18 years ago. All my other family is from here so I've been coming yearly since birth. We moved for an improved lifestyle and be near family but overall I feel nothing has really improved since we moved. We were able to provide our kids with better school opportunities than we could in FL which was the main point outside family. At this point we, and our adults kids, are looking toward a future than is not here. The only thing keeping is my mother who needs a lot of care otherwise we'd likely have moved already. Its not a bad area but the main perk is low cost of living (yes its go way up but still lower than most other areas) and sports if you enjoy that. We don't have budget to go flying all over and while Pgh has a lot to offer like art, museums, etc most are kinda one and done things with not much exciting w/in a couple hour drive. For us I think a large part is growing up as coastal people and just missing all that has to offer outdoors.
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Old 03-20-2024, 04:36 PM
 
220 posts, read 146,360 times
Reputation: 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by RetireinPA View Post
is this decline in AC spread equally across the county, or concentrated in pittsburgh and its close by neighborhoods?
I think it is a combination. It seems as if the city has been balancing out more even due mostly to immigrant population coming in. However, it seems as if many younger families are leaving the county and moving into the surrounding ones. Butler County gained over 1,000 residents over this past year due to domestic net migration. Washington has been consistently adding some residents due to that as well. Beaver somehow even did too this year as it barely declined, and Westmoreland did the best in a while too. In May, it will all be be broken down into townships and we will see what specific areas are growing. I would expect some in Allegheny to grow, mostly some of the traditional growing areas (townships in the north and west). The built out suburbs seem to be shrinking the most.
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Old 03-20-2024, 05:01 PM
 
5,097 posts, read 2,312,233 times
Reputation: 3338
Quote:
Originally Posted by RetireinPA View Post
is this decline in AC spread equally across the county, or concentrated in pittsburgh and its close by neighborhoods?
A quick look at the wikipedia pages of some upper-middle-class suburbs (Hampton, Mt. Lebanon, McCandless) shows that they're losing population at a slightly faster rate than the county as a whole. That doesn't bode well for the future of Allegheny County. I suspect that this exodus will only increase in the coming years.

Last edited by fat lou; 03-20-2024 at 05:10 PM..
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