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Old 09-25-2010, 10:54 PM
 
Location: Houston area, for now
948 posts, read 1,299,179 times
Reputation: 449

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These definitions are used in polling by Gallup and PEW. Also CNN, Fox, MSNBC, AP, Reuters and other media. I am not asking for what is better. I am asking if the diameters fit you and if not what combinations do.
Do you feel that these definitions state accurately who you are.

Left (Liberal)
Liberals usually embrace freedom of choice in personal matters, but tend to support significant government control of the economy. They generally support a government-funded "safety net" to help the disadvantaged, and advocate strict regulation of business. Liberals tend to favor environmental regulations, defend civil liberties and free expression, support government action to promote equality, and tolerate diverse lifestyles.

Libertarian
Libertarians support maximum liberty in both personal and economic matters. They advocate a much smaller government; one that is limited to protecting individuals from coercion and violence. Libertarians tend to embrace individual responsibility, oppose government bureaucracy and taxes, promote private charity, tolerate diverse lifestyles, support the free market, and defend civil liberties.

Centrist
Centrist prefer a "middle ground" regarding government control of the economy and personal behavior. Depending on the issue, they sometimes favor government intervention and sometimes support individual freedom of choice. Centrists pride themselves on keeping an open mind, tend to oppose "political extremes," and emphasize what they describe as "practical" solutions to problems.

Right (Conservative)
Conservatives tend to favor economic freedom, but frequently support laws to restrict personal behavior that violates "traditional values." They oppose excessive government control of business, while endorsing government action to defend morality and the traditional family structure. Conservatives usually support a strong military, oppose bureaucracy and high taxes, favor a free-market economy, and endorse strong law enforcement.

Statists (Big Government)
Statists want government to have a great deal of power over the economy and individual behavior. They frequently doubt whether economic liberty and individual freedom are practical options in today's world. Statists tend to distrust the free market, support high taxes and centralized planning of the economy, oppose diverse lifestyles, and question the importance of civil liberties.
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Old 09-25-2010, 10:55 PM
 
Location: Houston area, for now
948 posts, read 1,299,179 times
Reputation: 449
I don't think that it represents me accurately as I would be
Centrist, Libertarian, with a touch of Right (Conservative)

How ever in polling this is how people are weighed to define the feel of the country

Monday. after some input I'll make my point or be wrong in my theory
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