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Old 07-03-2007, 10:15 AM
 
Location: By the sea, by the sea, by the beautiful sea
68,329 posts, read 54,358,694 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by milliebfit View Post
This is what I am talking about..are we willing to fight or sacrifice for our country, like the "greatest generation" did. We are not perfect, but we have a great country even with Rush, Ann and Michael Moore in it!! I do not get the feeling that my age group really loves this country like the way my father loved his country.

Just curious what age group that is? My Dad was a WWII vet who went off to war without questioning yet during the Vietnam era he had no problem questioning our involvement and motives. I don't think it meant he had come to love his country any less and I loved him even more for it.
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Old 07-03-2007, 10:29 AM
 
Location: New Jersey
986 posts, read 2,807,705 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by burdell View Post
Just curious what age group that is? My Dad was a WWII vet who went off to war without questioning yet during the Vietnam era he had no problem questioning our involvement and motives. I don't think it meant he had come to love his country any less and I loved him even more for it.
I am in my 50's and my Father passed away in his mid 70's. My Father also fought in WWII he also questioned the vietnam war, but he LOVED his country and that was very clear to his 6 kids. When I listen to my generation talk about this country it is mostly negative, and that is my original question are the boomers patriotic, like our fathers were?
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Old 07-03-2007, 10:34 AM
 
Location: Washington DC
626 posts, read 992,772 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by milliebfit View Post
I am in my 50's and my Father passed away in his mid 70's. My Father also fought in WWII he also questioned the vietnam war, but he LOVED his country and that was very clear to his 6 kids. When I listen to my generation talk about this country it is mostly negative, and that is my original question are the boomers patriotic, like our fathers were?
I'm of the opinion that previous generations had more reasons to be patriotic. We used to be a great nation, a model for the world. But once we reached superpower status, it went to our head and things have started to go south. I can't speak for the baby boomers, but many of the negative attitudes people of my generation (X) have are justifiable. It's not that people don't want to be patriotic. It's that they don't agree with the actions of our government.
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Old 07-03-2007, 11:03 AM
 
Location: By the sea, by the sea, by the beautiful sea
68,329 posts, read 54,358,694 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by milliebfit View Post
I am in my 50's and my Father passed away in his mid 70's. My Father also fought in WWII he also questioned the vietnam war, but he LOVED his country and that was very clear to his 6 kids. When I listen to my generation talk about this country it is mostly negative, and that is my original question are the boomers patriotic, like our fathers were?
We're in the same ballpark and I have to say yes, I think we're as patriotic as our fathers were but probably in a somewhat different way.

Our fathers went through the depression and the way our country pulled out of it was quite an accomplishment Our fathers went off to a war that they had no question about. Our fathers came home and found jobs that they could pretty much count on for life.

We grew up being told to just climb under our desks when the A-bombs started falling and all would be well. We grew up with a lengthy war that was very questionable. We grew up watching one President assassinated and another resign in disgrace. Jobs? For life? Yeah, right!

I think we love our country as much as our fathers did, I just don't believe the times we've grown up in justify blind faith that we'll be told the truth and that the government will act in the best interests of the country or its people.
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Old 07-03-2007, 01:56 PM
 
Location: in the southwest
13,395 posts, read 45,011,343 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by burdell View Post

I think we love our country as much as our fathers did, I just don't believe the times we've grown up in justify blind faith that we'll be told the truth and that the government will act in the best interests of the country or its people.
Exactly.
I do not know how to articulate this very well, but I think our generation has been sort of America's bridge between the old and the new.
Social justice, women's rights, the environment: these all needed work, they got it on our watch, and America is now better for it. It seems to me that every generation gets their chance to do something, and the "counterculture" of our day was a shift in attitudes.
Did we get it perfectly? Well, probably not. Look at our Boomer President.
How did this effect the younger generation? I think they are already quite cynical about a lot of issues, and for good reason. As it is, far too many young men and women are dying.
One thing I've noticed when speaking with some younger people: most of them are still in favor of globalization--but not all. It will be interesting to see how this shakes out in years to come.
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Old 07-03-2007, 03:02 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
986 posts, read 2,807,705 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aqualung View Post
I'm of the opinion that previous generations had more reasons to be patriotic. We used to be a great nation, a model for the world. But once we reached superpower status, it went to our head and things have started to go south. I can't speak for the baby boomers, but many of the negative attitudes people of my generation (X) have are justifiable. It's not that people don't want to be patriotic. It's that they don't agree with the actions of our government.
Aqualung...We are a great nation, with all of it flaws we are still a great nation!!! I am proud to be an American and when I am with my husbands canadian family I always find myself defending my country and I feel so proud when I do. Tonight I am going to see the fireworks at my local high school. When they play the National Anthem we all will be standing with our hands over our hearts and for a brief moment we all will be proud that we are Americans.. Have a Happy 4th of July
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Old 07-03-2007, 09:00 PM
 
8,978 posts, read 16,552,765 times
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Default Complex Question

As a true "boomer" I can assure you that I am absolutely certain of the utter confusion I feel. My generation (b. 1948) saw a rapid transition from our parents' cocky self-assured WW II generation, through the naive innocence of the 50's, (my childhood) and directly into the tumultuous decade of the 60's.(my "coming of age"). I served in the US Navy during the Viet Nam years. The societal tumult in that decade took us through changes and upheavals like few similar periods in history.
Part of the Civil Rights movement in those years (and the accompanying push for rights for every conceivable group in society) necessitated the invention of "political correctness". Well-intentioned though it was, political correctness was instrumental in removing the concept of judgement from everyday discourse. This political correctness is still with us, and I believe, has rendered us incapable of seeing anything as strictly right or wrong. There is no possible crime, thought pattern, or habit that is "bad" (except possibly deer hunting). It has quite literally changed the meanings of many words in our language to the point that it has actually affected our thought-patterns.
Among George Bush's many flounderings and gaffes, (and they, of course, are legion), was his use of the term "evil" in his speeches, instantly branding him as a right-leaning kook. While I'm certainly fed up with his performance, nevertheless I would point out that, if there's really no "evil" or "good"-- no "right" vs. "wrong"- - no culture, or group, or way of thinking, or religion, or lifestyle any better or any worse than any other, then "patriotism" seems to me to be an exceedingly difficult concept to wrap one's mind around. It's rather a moot point, it seems. Patriotism in relation to what?, one might ask...
I'm not too good at this, so please step in someone, and set me straight (or "bawl me out")- let me just say that I remember being in SEVERAL heated arguments with nice, sophisticated, educated people just after 9-11, (some of whom were family members), who all INSISTED that it was excusable, and was just about ENTIRELY our fault, since we had "brought it on ourselves". I didn't detect any strong sense of patriotism there; I think I finally just backed off and changed the subject.
Also, I remember a news bite from those first tense weeks, in which the city fire trucks in Berkeley, Cal., were buzzing around sporting large American flags. Someone in city government ordered the flags removed, as they were seen to be "divisive"--- Excuse me ?? Divisive to WHOM, exactly? Is Berkeley a city in the United States? How then, was the flag "divisive"- -I never did get a lucid answer, and finally gave up....
With the above in mind, I'd like to read others' input. I simply don't even know exactly what patriotism is any more. I think we live in the greatest country on earth, with much to be proud of and much to be thankful for. It's just that I don't want to talk about it, fearing I may be seen as "divisive". Sure wouldn't want to annoy anyone who may be an al-Qaeda fan.
Looking forward to hearing other's thoughts.....
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Old 07-03-2007, 09:49 PM
 
Location: Northeast
1,300 posts, read 2,612,994 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by milliebfit View Post
When I talk to my mom who is almost 80, she with out a doubt loves this country. I do not get that same feeling when I talk with people my own
age (53). We are about to celebrate July 4th, so my question... are the boomers patriotic? What does this mean for our next generation?
No offense, seriously, but way too many of the boomers are "sell-outs".

If you went back in time to the summer of 1967 and asked one of those "kids" if they'd let things get the way they are now.....

C'mon.

I'm sorry, but the boomers should be leading the rest of America against the "Legion of Doom". Instead you've basically voted'em in, TWICE. Sure not all of you, but a lot of you.

You're more concerned with the price of real estate, how much you can get that stock for, and where you're going to retire.

I have high hopes for your group though. I really do hope that as we see the boomers retire, and have PLENTY of time on their hands, that they reflect on their life. I think it's going to happen. At that point, America will see a whole new wave of social consciousness. One that which we've never seen before.

Maybe not, but I can dream, right?

~T
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Old 07-03-2007, 10:07 PM
 
Location: By the sea, by the sea, by the beautiful sea
68,329 posts, read 54,358,694 times
Reputation: 40731
Quote:
Originally Posted by macmeal View Post
With the above in mind, I'd like to read others' input. I simply don't even know exactly what patriotism is any more. I think we live in the greatest country on earth, with much to be proud of and much to be thankful for. It's just that I don't want to talk about it, fearing I may be seen as "divisive". Sure wouldn't want to annoy anyone who may be an al-Qaeda fan.
Looking forward to hearing other's thoughts.....

I'm surprised to read you know people who thought we'd brought 9/11 upon ourselves, I'd only heard that sentiment expressed by Mr Falwell and Mr Robertson, both of whom I would've taken great pleasure in giving each a swift kick in the butt.

I'm just a year younger than you and share your confusion, the country, the government, and the world certainly bear little resemblance to what we were taught in school.
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Old 07-03-2007, 10:32 PM
 
Location: Old Town Alexandria
14,492 posts, read 26,587,680 times
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Fallwell is no longer with us.

I guess some of us can still hope- even as we see white collar jobs outsourced and construction and cheap labor over run this country. I saw a film of Ft Worth last night and it reminded me of a true third world country. Many of us younger boomers who wanted to retire to S Florida see what it has become- scary. Bush doesn't care. He has 98,000 acres in Venezuela. What do the rest of us have in 20 years???.
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