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Old 08-01-2011, 05:14 AM
 
Location: Texas
14,076 posts, read 18,696,416 times
Reputation: 7751

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House panel approves broadened ISP snooping bill | Privacy Inc. - CNET News

"Internet providers would be forced to keep logs of their customers' activities for one year--in case police want to review them in the future--under legislation that a U.S. House of Representatives committee approved today.

The 19 to 10 vote represents a victory for conservative Republicans, who made data retention their first major technology initiative after last fall's elections, and the Justice Department officials who have quietly lobbied for the sweeping new requirements, a development first reported by CNET.




They just never give up, do they? No matter what else happens, the GOP is always ready to hand law enforcement more powers to snoop into our lives and build a bigger data base on us. From the Patriot Act to this, they're unrelenting in their drive to keep tabs on everybody.

This reminds me of something which happened down here in Texas several years ago. Law enforcement demanded that ISP's turn over the surfing history of anybody remotely related to a Texas independence group, including anybody who had visited their website. Of all the ISP's in Texas, only two refused to comply and took the state to court.

They won their case on the grounds that the state had neither the grounds, nor the legal right to track peoples surfing habits.

Guess who was Governor then and whose Justice Department tried to overstep their legal bounds and spy on Texas citizens?

Last edited by CaseyB; 08-02-2011 at 05:44 AM.. Reason: copyright
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Old 08-01-2011, 05:49 AM
 
41,823 posts, read 45,028,640 times
Reputation: 17746
The only difference between current practices and what this legislation will do is possibly extend how long the ISP's hold onto this data. They already collect, analyze and store this information for their own purposes. I believe most are on a six month rotation instead of a year. Frankly you should be more concerned what they are doing with this data.


Quote:
They won their case on the grounds that the state had neither the grounds, nor the legal right to track peoples surfing habits.
I'm not familiar with this case but from your description it sounds like it would have been an issue with such a wide amount of records to be handed over, I'd agree, it sounds like too wide a request. If the government wants information on a specific user they can and will get it, it's done all the time.
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Old 08-01-2011, 06:17 AM
 
Location: Brooklyn
40,051 posts, read 31,861,800 times
Reputation: 10542
I wonder if the sponsors of the legislation will be issuing themselves (and, of course, their fellow Republicans) exemptions?
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Old 08-01-2011, 06:28 AM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
20,003 posts, read 16,668,387 times
Reputation: 3784
No problem. Just go to public wi-fi and use SSL proxies.
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Old 08-01-2011, 06:28 AM
 
23,837 posts, read 21,059,199 times
Reputation: 9395
For the record, this legislation is not supported by this conservative.
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Old 08-01-2011, 06:50 AM
 
Location: Londonderry, NH
41,478 posts, read 54,380,319 times
Reputation: 24736
I could care less if they look over my shoulder. They will not find ANYTHING I WOULD NOT SAY IN PUBLIC.
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Old 08-01-2011, 07:08 AM
 
41,823 posts, read 45,028,640 times
Reputation: 17746
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred314X View Post
I wonder if the sponsors of the legislation will be issuing themselves (and, of course, their fellow Republicans) exemptions?
Nobody would be exempt from this, the ISP isn't handing over data. It formalizes how long they need to retain that data. A request or subpoena to the ISP would be required to get it.
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Old 08-01-2011, 12:28 PM
 
29,986 posts, read 39,458,400 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred314X View Post
I wonder if the sponsors of the legislation will be issuing themselves (and, of course, their fellow Republicans) exemptions?
They usually do!
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Old 08-01-2011, 12:32 PM
 
Location: State of Being
35,883 posts, read 70,239,032 times
Reputation: 22582
Google already has your data - and what they don't have - Microsoft has. But I don't approve of legislation that requires companies to keep the data.
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Old 08-01-2011, 12:40 PM
 
Location: North Carolina
5,039 posts, read 3,058,917 times
Reputation: 9099
While the Republicans, who supposedly hold themselves out to be for smaller government and less intrusion of government into individuals' everyday lives doesn't seem to care about privacy issues of the citizens they represent, the Democrats don't do much better with many of them voting in favor of the Patriot Act. I don't exactly see either party championing privacy issues or civil liberties (outside of a few politically hot button issues that only affect a certain segment of the population) nowadays, so both parties deserve shame in this.
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