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Old 09-07-2011, 02:09 PM
 
Location: Long Island
32,816 posts, read 19,363,612 times
Reputation: 9616

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kirdik View Post
As much as I agree with your sentiment I don't think that protectionism is going to work.
Why do you think they won't retaliate? I'm sure we sell something to them.
What makes you think they won't impose tariffs on our export products in return?
I'm sure they probably will...and so what

does it matter if GM sells cars in china????

why is the number 1 and 2, 3 and 4 LUXURY cars in america NOT Cadillac, and Lincoln,.....why lexus (overprices toyota)...infinity (overpriced Nisson) and BMW, and Mercedes and acura(overpriced honda)

infact in the top 10 luxury cars only cadi places with the cts and the srx

 
Old 09-07-2011, 02:10 PM
 
2,541 posts, read 2,729,267 times
Reputation: 492
Quote:
Originally Posted by no1brownsfan View Post
I agree. Unfortunately if we try to impose tariffs on those who send jobs overseas, they're liable to throw a hissy fit, and move their WHOLE operation out of the country, and pull the proverbial "boy gets p***ed off and takes his ball and goes home! Look, I don't begrudge anyone for making their way in the world, or trying to become successful! What I can't stand is the downright GREED from some of these rich fat cats. Not to mention that they're firmly OK with paying someone $0.10 an hour, while polluting the environment, in horrible working conditions tells me that they slavery is still alive and well in this world, and they condone it! And at the expense of our fellow countrymen!
If there was incentive to 'move their whole operation out of the country' they would have done so already. And you can't just willy nilly move a publicly traded corporation around like it was a private company. There needs to be brainstorming sessions done with people with brains, such as Kucinich and Paul, in order to find a way to penalize rather than reward corporations for their outsourcing of America's future. If we bring the jobs back, there are enough jobs. We don't need to throw another 300 billion into rebuilding the infrastructure or whatever the stimulus plan of the month is.
 
Old 09-07-2011, 02:12 PM
 
Location: Long Island
32,816 posts, read 19,363,612 times
Reputation: 9616
Quote:
Originally Posted by freefall View Post
If there was incentive to 'move their whole operation out of the country' they would have done so already. And you can't just willy nilly move a publicly traded corporation around like it was a private company. There needs to be brainstorming sessions done with people with brains, such as Kucinich and Paul, in order to find a way to penalize rather than reward corporations for their outsourcing of America's future. If we bring the jobs back, there are enough jobs. We don't need to throw another 300 billion into rebuilding the infrastructure or whatever the stimulus plan of the month is.
exactly

look at GM...we SAVE the company (should have let it go and be split up) and it builds a new assembly plant......IN MEXICO
 
Old 09-07-2011, 02:20 PM
 
5,915 posts, read 4,796,834 times
Reputation: 1398
Quote:
Originally Posted by workingclasshero View Post
exactly

look at GM...we SAVE the company (should have let it go and be split up) and it builds a new assembly plant......IN MEXICO
That wasn't as much about saving the company as it was saving the UAW.
 
Old 09-07-2011, 02:23 PM
 
Location: A great city, by a Great Lake!
15,896 posts, read 11,929,084 times
Reputation: 7502
Quote:
Originally Posted by freefall View Post
If there was incentive to 'move their whole operation out of the country' they would have done so already. And you can't just willy nilly move a publicly traded corporation around like it was a private company. There needs to be brainstorming sessions done with people with brains, such as Kucinich and Paul, in order to find a way to penalize rather than reward corporations for their outsourcing of America's future. If we bring the jobs back, there are enough jobs. We don't need to throw another 300 billion into rebuilding the infrastructure or whatever the stimulus plan of the month is.

I'm not arguing with you in the least. I truly hope to GOD that Paul will get the nomination! Kucinich.... eh... not so sure about him. Some of his ideas are good, but he was a big part of the decline of the city of Cleveland when he was the "boy mayor." But as for penalizing some of these corporations for sending jobs overseas, I say lets do it, and start now! Sooner or later these corporations are going to end up losing money, because they can't sell their products due to the fact nobody will be able to afford them, because they're not working!
 
Old 09-07-2011, 02:51 PM
 
2,541 posts, read 2,729,267 times
Reputation: 492
Quote:
Originally Posted by no1brownsfan View Post
I'm not arguing with you in the least. I truly hope to GOD that Paul will get the nomination! Kucinich.... eh... not so sure about him. Some of his ideas are good, but he was a big part of the decline of the city of Cleveland when he was the "boy mayor." But as for penalizing some of these corporations for sending jobs overseas, I say lets do it, and start now! Sooner or later these corporations are going to end up losing money, because they can't sell their products due to the fact nobody will be able to afford them, because they're not working!
This is who we need to be elected - someone with the balls to stand up.


Sarah: Shortly after you were elected mayor of Cleveland in 1977, you took a stand against the city’s banks and refused to sell the city-owned utility.

As a result, you lost your re-election bid in 1979 and were out of public life for some time.

Dennis: I campaigned for mayor on a promise to save the municipal electric system.

There had been a long effort to privatize our electric system, and for years I had led an effort to withstand that pressure.

Finally, the council and the mayor prior to myself agreed to sell. I campaigned to save the system, got elected, and my first act in office was to cancel the sale.

The private electric company had very close business relations with the banks.

The banks let me know that if I didn’t go along with the sale, they would not renew the city’s credit.

I had reduced the city’s spending by 10 percent, but without access to credit—at a time when I was still paying off bills from the previous administration—I knew the city could go into default.

So I was being blackmailed.

I knew when I refused to sell, that I would be ending my political career.

I made the decision to save the electric system, a decision that turned out to be a pivotal moment in my life.

The credit was cut, the city defaulted, and I lost my bid for re-election; I was out of public life, something that I had dedicated my life to.

For years, I couldn’t get a job in the city where I had challenged the banks.

My marriage fell apart, and I spent a lot of time walking streets in a lot of major cities trying to figure out how to put a career back together again.

Eventually, it was understood that the decision was the right thing for the people of Cleveland, because that electric system that I saved now provides savings of 25 to 30 percent.

Sarah: I understand the Cleveland City Council honored you for “having the courage and foresight to refuse to sell the city’s municipal electric system.”

But during the time when you were essentially in exile, what did you think about what you had done?

Dennis: I grew up believing that if you did the right thing, it always works out. I hadn’t ever thought about what happens if you do the right thing and then you get blasted.

But I never doubted it was the right decision.

Sarah: So many people in political life might have said, politics is about compromise. You have to give in on some things in order to remain a player so as to fight another day.

Dennis: I had a meeting on the morning of December 15th with the head of the city council and the head of the largest bank, and that was exactly the discussion we had. The president of the bank told me that only if I agreed to sell the municipal electric system would he renew the city’s credit, and if I did agree to the sale, he would give the city an additional $50 million worth of credit. I said, “Look, I can’t do that. The utility belongs to the people, it’s not mine to sell.”

So why did I choose to do that? I guess for me it was a test. Was it more important to advance politically?

I was 32 years old, and I was the youngest mayor of any big city in the country. There were people talking about me being on a fast track for governor or senator. There were even stories circulating that I would do a test visit to New Hampshire. At the same time I’m thinking, that’s all illusion. The reality is in front of me; the reality is I have an obligation to the people who put me in office to defend their interests and not to sell them out.

I didn’t realize it then, but I was really being asked to submit to a view of the world that holds that corporate values must triumph over the public good. That’s the decision I had to take a stand on, and I tell you, it was a time in America when it was considered unseemly, in poor taste, to even raise the issue.

“This is what corporations say you ought to do, well, just do it!” People are now starting to look at the overwhelming influence of corporations in public life and how the public good can be undermined. People are now more sensitive to how the public pays an exorbitant cost for electricity, for fuel, for defense, because of undue corporate influence, and there’s an increasing awareness of the heavy cost of privatization of public resources.
 
Old 09-07-2011, 02:55 PM
 
Location: Long Island
32,816 posts, read 19,363,612 times
Reputation: 9616
kucinich is a nut case that thinks he was abducted by aliens

he also BANKRUPTED cleveland
 
Old 09-07-2011, 04:02 PM
 
Location: A great city, by a Great Lake!
15,896 posts, read 11,929,084 times
Reputation: 7502
Quote:
Originally Posted by workingclasshero View Post
kucinich is a nut case that thinks he was abducted by aliens

he also BANKRUPTED cleveland

It's true. While he wasn't the sole cause of Cleveland's decline, he certainly didn't help matters, and probably accelerated the it. Paul I'd vote for in a heartbeat. An absolute NO for Kucinich! And furthermore, he is nothing more than a career politician! Due to the population shifts his seat is being eliminated. Instead of staying in Ohio in some way, he is pondering moving to Washington to run for office out there! Kind of a b*** slap to us in Ohio if you ask me!

The city of Cleveland itself in 1950 had a population of close to 1 million people and was the 6th largest city in the country. Now in 2011 it's population is now just under 400,000. Keep in mind as a metro area, Cleveland and NE Ohio are still one of the largest in the country, but the population growth has been stagnant. It looks like the region has grown, because of sprawl, but the population has really only shifted. On a positive note this region recently has purged some corrupt politicians, and I'm sure more will fall. Ohio has also recently legalized gambling, and there is a casino in the works downtown, as well as a new Medical Mart Convention Center which is badly needed if we are to compete with other cities comparable in size. Furthermore there is a major revamp project of the Flats (a former night club hot spot) as well as the medical industry is booming here. As far as downtowns go we have one of the fastest growing downtown populations. It isn't all doom and gloom here, and if they can get the 5 billion dollars worth of projects done without tripping over their own feet, and actually get a plan in the works to develop the water front, then we may turn this thing around here. All and all Cleveland and NE Ohio isn't the hole in the wall that it's made out to be. And, guess what? While other places in the US are running out of it... We have the water! A ton of it! OK... sorry, I deviated a bit, but had to throw some props to my hometown!
 
Old 09-07-2011, 08:00 PM
 
4,538 posts, read 4,793,476 times
Reputation: 1548
Quote:
Originally Posted by workingclasshero View Post
yep its simple

1. eliminate/sharply reduce the CORPORATE TAX
2. install/increase import tarrifs on ALL IMPORTS...to include USA companies that make their stuff in mexico (like GE)
3. eliminate the IRS and the income tax...go with a consumption tax..... Americans For Fair Taxation: Americans For Fair Taxation
4. mandate an equaling of property tax rates (having corporate/commersial rates being higher than residental rates is not fair...property is property be it residential or commersial)
5. set a standard for utility rates
If you reduce the corporate tax further, there will be no incentive to end the outsorcing - unless lower corporate taxes are tied to keeping jobs here.
 
Old 09-07-2011, 10:24 PM
 
6,022 posts, read 7,802,571 times
Reputation: 746
Quote:
Originally Posted by LuckyGem View Post
Then that's what we need. NATIONALIZATION.

Where did Globalism get us? OUTSOURCING!

Time to bring the jobs back home! Time to make things in the USA again.

WONT HAPPEN
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