U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Politics and Other Controversies
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-04-2013, 04:57 PM
 
Location: Maryland
18,626 posts, read 18,496,943 times
Reputation: 6429

Advertisements

What a symbolic story of the demise of a large swath of the African American community. One man perseverance against racial animus to become a member of a famed part of our armed forces, leaves his rural town and gets his part of the American Dream. Only to be carjacked 70 years later by black teens spewing the same offensive words he heard as a young man in Alabama.


Quote:
The day of the incident started out like many Saturdays for Rutledge: He drove his 1999 Jeep Cherokee to the Sportzone Barber Shop not far from his home.

"I like to go down and see my buddies in the barber shop, and watch TV for awhile," he said. "I left the shop and was walking toward my Jeep, when these kids came out of this abandoned house and walked straight toward me like they know me or something.

"The littlest one had the gun and he did all the talking. He said, 'Give me your keys.' I was slow getting the keys and this kid racks his gun and tells me, 'You don't think I'll shoot you, do you (expletive)?' Where would someone that young get a gun like that?"

Rutledge, an Alabama native who heard the same racial epithet many times growing up in the Deep South and while serving in the military, said it was disconcerting to have an African-American youth call him that while leveling a pistol at him.

"I don't know what's wrong with these kids," he said. "When I was that age, I was working a mule, plowing fields. These kids have no home-training, I guess."


From The Detroit News: Four teens charged in Detroit carjacking of 88-year-old Tuskegee airman | The Detroit News | detroitnews.com

I remember when a GOP congressman suggested sincerely that maybe they should hire some of the unemployed inner city Black youth at local farms, the press and liberals denounced him as a racist. Yet maybe he's on to something.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-04-2013, 05:01 PM
 
Location: Springfield, Ohio
14,206 posts, read 13,118,070 times
Reputation: 14462
Sad story, and even more sad that my first thought was "Well at least they didn't kill him".
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-04-2013, 05:20 PM
 
1,730 posts, read 1,308,758 times
Reputation: 760
Mr. Rutledge seems like a stand up guy. Too bad other folks up there will ignore or even hate him for his comments about these black kids and their lack of parenting.
Bill Cosby tried it and what did that get him? Booed and ignored.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-04-2013, 05:32 PM
 
Location: WY
6,201 posts, read 4,693,816 times
Reputation: 7731
I really hate to hear stories like this. This elderly man was a true patriot who fought for this nation (and for the freedom of the world) at a time in history when his own country barely acknowledged his contribution.

Political BS aside, I often wonder how truly brave black men and women (who suffered, and who risked injury and death) to fight for real freedom for African Americans in this country, would feel if they could look at the state of the black race in the year 2013. Would they think that their bravery and the risks that they took for equality was worth it?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-04-2013, 05:36 PM
 
66,979 posts, read 56,045,380 times
Reputation: 19931
Quote:
Originally Posted by DoD Guy View Post
Mr. Rutledge seems like a stand up guy. Too bad other folks up there will ignore or even hate him for his comments about these black kids and their lack of parenting.
Bill Cosby tried it and what did that get him? Booed and ignored.
Bill Cosby isn't a hated many. I don't know a single Black person who hates Bill Cosby. I would say many Black people were upset, not so much at what Cosby has said, but more at airing out dirty laundry. There are many Blacks who really abhor some of the things that have taken place in a specific segment of the Black population. However, and this is just my opinion, some Blacks were more embarrassed at what Bill Cosby had to say rather than mad at him. I would say it was about "airing Black America's dirty laundry in public" that many did not like.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-04-2013, 05:41 PM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
9,698 posts, read 4,754,192 times
Reputation: 4268
Quote:
Originally Posted by green_mariner View Post
Bill Cosby isn't a hated many. I don't know a single Black person who hates Bill Cosby. I would say many Black people were upset, not so much at what Cosby has said, but more at airing out dirty laundry. There are many Blacks who really abhor some of the things that have taken place in a specific segment of the Black population. However, and this is just my opinion, some Blacks were more embarrassed at what Bill Cosby had to say rather than mad at him. I would say it was about "airing Black America's dirty laundry in public" that many did not like.
My cousin was one of those. He wasn't upset at the message though. He was upset at the audience. In his words, it was a rich Black man talking to middle class Blacks about poor Blacks. Black people are already familiar w/ the ills of the community, it's getting the people who are close to the problem to do something. That audience wasn't the audience to fix the problem.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-04-2013, 05:43 PM
 
66,979 posts, read 56,045,380 times
Reputation: 19931
Quote:
Originally Posted by juneaubound View Post
I really hate to hear stories like this. This elderly man was a true patriot who fought for this nation (and for the freedom of the world) at a time in history when his own country barely acknowledged his contribution.

Political BS aside, I often wonder how truly brave black men and women (who suffered, and who risked injury and death) to fight for real freedom for African Americans in this country, would feel if they could look at the state of the black race in the year 2013. Would they think that their bravery and the risks that they took for equality was worth it?
This is how I look at it. There are many things that have improved for Blacks. There are more Black college graduates than ever before(including me). There are more Blacks in the middle class than ever before. Blacks now can vote and do many other things.

However, there has been some bad that has taken place. I would attribute this to the drug epidemic(with the CIA helping to bring in cocaine), and with other problems taking place. What has happened to the Black community in terms of out-of-wedlock births, and single parent homes, this is a national trend. It has just affected Blacks worse for some reasons.

I would say the Black leaders who fought and risked death might look at this from different sides. They would be happy to see more Black college graduates, more Black politicians, more Black businessmen. However, they would also look at the bad that is taking place as well. I would say a mix of optimism for the good that has happened, and anger at the bad that has happened.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-04-2013, 05:55 PM
 
66,979 posts, read 56,045,380 times
Reputation: 19931
Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieB.Good View Post
My cousin was one of those. He wasn't upset at the message though. He was upset at the audience. In his words, it was a rich Black man talking to middle class Blacks about poor Blacks. Black people are already familiar w/ the ills of the community, it's getting the people who are close to the problem to do something. That audience wasn't the audience to fix the problem.
I remember when he said what he said. I was about to graduate from high school. What he had to say didn't bother me. I didn't think it was a big deal what he said. He was saying things I felt were kind of true. I didn't remember any big controversy about it. I will say this. The audience who should have been listening to Bill Cosby probably would not have listened. I think one reason little has been done is because this was a rich Black man talking to middle class Blacks about poor Blacks. As you say, it is getting the people close to the problem to fix it. The audience didn't live that close to the problems. One reason little has been done. Those who need to listen the most often listen the least.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-04-2013, 05:56 PM
 
8,391 posts, read 6,035,875 times
Reputation: 2314
Quote:
Originally Posted by EdwardA View Post
What a symbolic story of the demise of a large swath of the African American community. One man perseverance against racial animus to become a member of a famed part of our armed forces, leaves his rural town and gets his part of the American Dream. Only to be carjacked 70 years later by black teens spewing the same offensive words he heard as a young man in Alabama.





I remember when a GOP congressman suggested sincerely that maybe they should hire some of the unemployed inner city Black youth at local farms, the press and liberals denounced him as a racist. Yet maybe he's on to something.

Here is the thing that amazes me about racists, they consistently present this dumb idea of collective black group behavior.

The actions of individual black people are never about those individual black people, no instead to the racist mind those action are used to point out some collective black racial failing.

Inevitably, other racists chime in with their own tales and judgements of the collective racial failings of the black race.

When someone comes along points out that race cannot explain human behavior, and that those who see the actions of individual black people as evidence of a collective black racial failing are indeed applying racist thinking to American social problems. Those people immediately start saying they aren't racist.

Well, I don't know whats in any person's heart, but if you aren't a racist, you sure think like one.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-04-2013, 06:02 PM
 
Location: Wartrace,TN
7,129 posts, read 11,366,071 times
Reputation: 14369
Some flaws with the story. 1) The Tuskegee airmen never flew the B-25 on combat missions and never saw service in the Pacific theater or war. They never deployed to any war zone. The fighter group did deploy and were very successful.
Tuskegee Airmen - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Furthermore the the 477th wasn't even formed until 1943. I have no doubt this man was in the Army during WW 2 but no, he didn't fly combat missions over Japan.

Furthermore Saipan wasn't seized by the USMC until 1944 and was the first airbase within range of our long range bombers (the B-29 superfort). No way a B-25 would have even been able to make a one way trip.

Last edited by Wartrace; 03-04-2013 at 06:20 PM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Politics and Other Controversies

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:01 AM.

© 2005-2022, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top