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Old 05-31-2013, 10:23 AM
 
69,292 posts, read 57,826,490 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steven_h View Post
Another in an endless line of race and hate baiting threads!
I don't think the OP intended for it to be that way. However, threads like this bring out the worst in so many people.
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Old 05-31-2013, 11:40 AM
 
Location: NW Arkansas
1,201 posts, read 1,867,480 times
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I lived in Kentucky for three years and the racism there was rampant. I heard the n-word dropped by whites so many times it is obnoxious. I knew a black man who said that he would never leave Lexington because "black folk don't belong in the country. They never come back." Meaning, he was terrified he would be killed if he ventured outside of the city.

That same man told me that when he was a boy, some white kids tied him up and threw rocks at his head. That would have probably been in the 70s, though.

I remember a guy telling me he lived in Alabama for a while, and it was so much nicer than Kentucky because, "the black people are still scared of whites there."

In the urban area of Arkansas I live in now, I hear the n-word pretty often. The other day at work, this white guy kept saying it loudly in a restaurant full of people. He didn't see anything wrong with it!

And, I mean, the n-word is not subtle at all. It's blatant racism. Imagine how much more subtle racism is going on if the n-word is so common.

Last edited by soanchorless; 05-31-2013 at 11:51 AM..
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Old 05-31-2013, 11:45 AM
 
1,614 posts, read 1,994,893 times
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Psssh, blacks need to be like asians and realize that a bunch of rich white liberals aren't going to do jack **** for them...
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Old 05-31-2013, 11:59 AM
 
Location: NW Arkansas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zombocom View Post
Psssh, blacks need to be like asians and realize that a bunch of rich white liberals aren't going to do jack **** for them...
No doubt. It still doesn't negate the fact that the whole system/culture is unjust if people have to do that.

And really, the Asians were not brought here by white people and persecuted for 200+ years.
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Old 05-31-2013, 01:16 PM
 
22,769 posts, read 29,641,967 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blink101 View Post
Recently I met with some old high school friends and was startled by some of their comments on race. Though all of us grew up in the South, most of my friends are from upper-middle class white families and were sheltered from real competition or had limited interaction with other races aside from Asians, so most had little to no interest in even acknowledging various races existed. I suppose time out in the real world has changed that because everyone kept making subtle comments and pushing the envelope as if trying to provoke a conversation or testing to see how safe it was to discuss. This caused two very striking moments.

1. While we were at the park someone anxiously noted that a piñata across the lake looked like a little person was hanging from the tree. Everyone became agitated and there was definitely a great deal of tension. Some even mumbled about how "That family needed to hurry up and finish then take that thing down." When one well-meaning friend from New Mexico asked why we were upset someone finally blurted it out: "It looks like a little black man." What was most striking to me was how every Southerner present continued to look over their back at that tree and just stare at it until finally the piñata was taken down. Then no one looked that way again. Even so, this was what actually started the strange mumbles about race throughout the rest of the picnic.

2. I finally decided to bite and blurted out my own opinions on race by saying this: "I don't think we're any less racist than previous generations. It's merely the mode of racism that has changed. Nowadays we uphold racial hierarchies by pretending they don't exist through color-blindness. It enables us to distance ourselves from the problem and pushes it onto some perceived "racist other" which we label as the problem. Y'all didn't think it was a coincidence there were virtually no black or Hispanic kids in your AP classes, did you? The truth is that it isn't those rednecks that have any realistic power to maintain racial oppression. It's the educated, upper-middle class sectors of society which have the power to control the flow of token integration and limit true racial equality. In other words... WE are the real problem and the beneficiaries of racial hierarchies." Since all that was pretty controversial and I had basically defied all of their previous comments, I expected an extreme backlash, but instead my friends questioned me as if I suddenly explained to them how the world worked.

That was when I realized that our generation is the post Civil Rights movement generation, and I think many of us have wanted to believe that all the battles which needed to be fought for racial equality had been won. However, as we're coming of age and looking around expecting a better world, I think many of us are becoming increasingly aware of the failures of the Civil Rights movement. I wonder if this growing dissatisfaction is an isolated instance among me and my friends struggling to explain the inequalities we see or if this might be the beginning of a new resurgence of the Civil Rights movement. Has anyone else noticed a growing sense of "something isn't right but I don't know what or how to fix it" among young people (particularly in the South?

I am young, white, southern, UMC, and I can't really relate to what you're talking about. Sorry.

I had one or two friends who bought into the whole "white guilt" thing. I never really understood it.

My thinking was more like: "Something isn't right, but I'll be damned if I'm responsible for it."

I always felt I was privileged by virtue of having intelligent, competent parents who cared about me, not because I was white.

Last edited by le roi; 05-31-2013 at 01:25 PM..
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Old 05-31-2013, 01:22 PM
 
1,614 posts, read 1,994,893 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by soanchorless View Post
No doubt. It still doesn't negate the fact that the whole system/culture is unjust if people have to do that.

And really, the Asians were not brought here by white people and persecuted for 200+ years.
I don't see rich white people helping out poor white people, either.

That's just the way it is.

Asians were stripped of their property, denied employment, denied education, placed in concentration camps, etc... Now they make more money than whites, are more educated, and less likely to be in jail.

What happened historically isn't going to change anything today. I didn't own any slaves, I live in California.
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Old 05-31-2013, 01:44 PM
 
16,546 posts, read 13,005,967 times
Reputation: 4237
Quote:
Originally Posted by soanchorless View Post
No doubt. It still doesn't negate the fact that the whole system/culture is unjust if people have to do that.

And really, the Asians were not brought here by white people and persecuted for 200+ years.
You're right, Asians didn't sell their own people into the slave trade then one of them, once freed from Indentured Servitude, sues to OWN his own slave which sparked the slavery you speak of. You ARE aware that a black man started slavery that we know right?
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Old 05-31-2013, 01:50 PM
 
Location: CHicago, United States
6,934 posts, read 8,197,301 times
Reputation: 3500
Quote:
I think many of us are becoming increasingly aware of the failures of the Civil
Rights movement.
What failures?
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Old 05-31-2013, 01:51 PM
 
69,292 posts, read 57,826,490 times
Reputation: 20617
Quote:
Originally Posted by zombocom View Post
I don't see rich white people helping out poor white people, either.

That's just the way it is.

Asians were stripped of their property, denied employment, denied education, placed in concentration camps, etc... Now they make more money than whites, are more educated, and less likely to be in jail.

What happened historically isn't going to change anything today. I didn't own any slaves, I live in California.
Asians were also given a formal apology years later and given reparations. And the Asians that have been coming here since 1970 have a totally different narrative from Blacks who have been here BECAUSE of slavery.

African Blacks have a far different narrative than Black Americans as well.

And consider this. No Asian ethnic group is the same. Japanese, Indians, Koreans,Chinese and Filipinos tend to have higher education levels, and higher incomes. Higher poverty levels and higher crime levels tend to take place among Cambodians and Hmong people. Go look up M.O.D., a Hmong gang in Minnesota.
Minnesota - Gangland Documentary - Menace Of Destruction Gang (MOD) (1 of 3) - YouTube

Another gang member found guilty in slaying of Tibetans at pool hall | StarTribune.com
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