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Old 09-01-2013, 08:09 AM
 
25,927 posts, read 16,660,393 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Indentured Servant View Post
Said another way, just where should African Americans be today, given that for over 300 years, they were oppressed in this nation? Do you think they have underperformed in their rise from oppression? I ask because there seem to be this implicit assumption that others have "been there and done that", in regards to what blacks have experienced, yet, they have moved to equality by now. If one does not imply that, then usually what is implied is that somehow where blacks are as a people, should be much better.....but based upon what criteria? Who has established the benchmark for comparison and is the situation the same in degree and or kind?
My neighbor was born in Vietnam as an ethnic minority (Hmong) that had been persecuted in Vietnam for 1000+ years. He came here in the 70's. He and his wife learned English, raised 6 children that all graduated from college. 3 of them are medical doctors. Amazing people. I guess I don't understand why black people are struggling as bad as they are. You get one chance at life, why waste it for any reason?
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Old 09-01-2013, 08:35 AM
 
73,232 posts, read 63,127,655 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PullMyFinger View Post
My neighbor was born in Vietnam as an ethnic minority (Hmong) that had been persecuted in Vietnam for 1000+ years. He came here in the 70's. He and his wife learned English, raised 6 children that all graduated from college. 3 of them are medical doctors. Amazing people. I guess I don't understand why black people are struggling as bad as they are. You get one chance at life, why waste it for any reason?
Something to consider. Yes, he went through alot in Vietnam. He also came here to do better. I understand why he came and did better. He was coming with the mentality of an immigrant. I can understand his sentiments. He views the USA as the land of freedom and opportunity.

In this nation, I feel that many Blacks don't view the USA the same way a refugee from Vietnam would view it, mainly from history.

And it hasn't been without struggle for the Hmong. While there have been some success stories with the Hmong, there have also been some problems, such as gang violence.
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Old 09-01-2013, 09:36 AM
 
Location: USA
13,255 posts, read 12,179,653 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PullMyFinger View Post
My neighbor was born in Vietnam as an ethnic minority (Hmong) that had been persecuted in Vietnam for 1000+ years. He came here in the 70's. He and his wife learned English, raised 6 children that all graduated from college. 3 of them are medical doctors. Amazing people. I guess I don't understand why black people are struggling as bad as they are. You get one chance at life, why waste it for any reason?
There's a lot of factors that could've influenced his success. And just like your story, there's also a ton of stories of blacks being successful after coming from terrible circumstances.
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Old 09-01-2013, 09:39 AM
 
Location: USA
13,255 posts, read 12,179,653 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by georgia dem View Post
oh brother!!
what a total crock!!!
why would anyone resent black people having success???
hell if more of them made THAT a priority instead of playing victims and pissing and moaning like this bs we would have a lot more money here to spend on schools or repairing our roads and bridges
instead of the billions being paid for welfare and food stamps
your statement is just loony tunes!!!!
It does happen. It's happened to my father, my old roommate, mom.


Luckily I look poor enough that I don't have those problems.
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Old 09-01-2013, 09:45 AM
 
17,468 posts, read 12,999,781 times
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Seems to me blacks of today cannot compare their selves to the day of slavery......time to get off the pity train and realize education is open to anyone who gives a sh*t!
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Old 09-01-2013, 09:48 AM
 
17,468 posts, read 12,999,781 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gtownoe View Post
There's a lot of factors that could've influenced his success. And just like your story, there's also a ton of stories of blacks being successful after coming from terrible circumstances.
Our President was raised by a poor white woman and look where it got him......I do have to wonder about the "poor" part of living this President claims to have lived. Blacks can do anything whites can do, it's been proved.
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Old 09-01-2013, 09:51 AM
 
Location: USA
13,255 posts, read 12,179,653 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 3~Shepherds View Post
Our President was raised by a poor white woman and look where it got him......I do have to wonder about the "poor" part of living this President claims to have lived. Blacks can do anything whites can do, it's been proved.
I agree with you. I just think there's a lot of factors that people miss when your talking about where somebody ends up in life. First you have to figure out what that person's goals are. Everybody has different goals. So what you might consider success, others might not. Or what you might want out of life, might not be what somebody else wants.


My family started out on welfare living in government housing and on food stamps. Both my parents came from very rough backgrounds. I won't go into detail.

Today they're successful business owners and my siblings and I have benefitted greatly from them overcoming their hardships.



Talk to them though and they'll tell you of many, many experiences where even after they achieved success, they were knocked down and belittled by society. Or made to feel inferior.
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Old 09-01-2013, 10:37 AM
 
Location: Alameda, CA
7,605 posts, read 4,866,412 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac_Muz View Post
I can't provide an exact date for when Jim Crow ended. For all I know Jim Crow is alive and well today.

I'ld like to say Jim Crow ended in 1964 or 1965, but I am pretty sure Jim Crow is doing very well somewhere in the deep south.

I was 13 years old when MLK was faced to face with Wallace. 1 year later i was living on my own in Boston. from what i could see there was no Jim Crow in Boston.

I didn't like what I saw of Jim Crow in the deep south, but no one hears me now, and when I was 13 no one cared better then. Is what it is.

Ended is a term that is too concrete to me, unless we are talking digital and or machines. They say slavery 'ended', but the truth is it never has, and may not in the time of silly man.
No Jim Crow in Boston?

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/eyesontheprize/milestones/m14_boston.html

During the 1950s and 1960s, Ruth Batson of the NAACP and other activists investigated Boston public schools and found tremendous differences and inequities in the staffing, supplying and maintenance of schools that served mostly white or mostly black students. They held meetings and rallies, organized freedom schools and independent busing programs, and successfully lobbied for state legislation to demonstrate the segregated and unequal nature of Boston schools. The Boston School Committee continued to reject the notion that the schools were essentially a segregated system and took steps to maintain that segregation. So the NAACP turned to the federal courts. In 1974, US District Court Judge W. Arthur Garrity, Jr. found the city of Boston guilty of unconstitutional and intentional segregation in its schools.

American Experience.Eyes on the Prize.Profiles | PBS

Following Federal District Judge W. Arthur Garrity's 1974 decision to integrate the Boston public schools, white City Council member Louise Day Hicks and other opponents formed Restore Our Alienated Rights (ROAR). Their rallies drew the support of the School Committee, most of the Boston City Council, and many teachers and police. White parents and community leaders had been active throughout the 1960s to prevent even limited forms of desegregation in Boston's schools. When school started in the fall of 1974, white parents met the buses of black students with racial epithets, stones and bottles. They shattered windows and sent black students home with broken glass in their hair. They harassed white families who went along with desegregation. The violence centered around the working-class community of South Boston High School, which was eventually put into receivership by the court,
but was also present in the city's middle class white neighborhoods.

Jim Crow is definitely not purely a Southern thing and has never completely disappeared. Yes nowadays there are legal protections. However, some of the more current subtle forms of Jim Crow make it harder to combat.
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Old 09-01-2013, 11:12 AM
 
56,966 posts, read 35,363,290 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Max Sterling View Post
I don't understand how things that happened decades and even hundreds of years ago should impact blacks of 2013 to the point that many of them can't get ahead and improve their lives or that would cause many of them to act out violently?

If you've been born in the last 20-30 years, you've NEVER experienced slavery and you've avoided the majority of racism and oppression that your ancestors experienced. So what's their excuse for not improving?

Also if you still want to make the argument that history matters, then please explain why black Canadians who experienced little to no slavery and oppression are STILL far and away the most violent group of people on a per capita basis in Canada and many of them also live in poverty just like their American counterparts? Why do black Canadians who have a much different history than black Americans still share the shame problems of high crime rates, high violence and high rates of poverty/low income?.
I don't know a damn thing about Black Canadians, so save that for someone else. Ask THEM if you're so curious.

All i know is that when i'm in Canada, i've had no problems with Blacks or anyone else for that matter.

Now back to the United States...answer my question. Name another group with the exact same story in this country as African Americans, and then tell me where they stand today.
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Old 09-01-2013, 08:30 PM
 
1,300 posts, read 1,048,260 times
Reputation: 3625
Quote:
Originally Posted by desertdetroiter View Post
I don't know a damn thing about Black Canadians, so save that for someone else. Ask THEM if you're so curious.


All i know is that when i'm in Canada, i've had no problems with Blacks or anyone else for that matter.
If you bothered to google 'black Canadians' you could inform yourself abit. Here' let me help you abit:

The abolition of slavery


Slavery was all but abolished throughout the other British North American colonies by 1800, and was illegal throughout the British Empire by 1834. This made Canada an attractive destination for those fleeing slavery in the United States, such as minister Boston King. Furthermore, on 24 March 1837, black men in Canada were given the right to vote.[30]

The Anti-Slavery Society of Canada estimated in its first report in 1852 that the "coloured population of Upper Canada" was about 30,000, of whom almost all adults were "fugitive slaves".[31] St. Catharines had a population of 6,000 at that time; 800 of them were "of African descent".


And here's more:

Underground Railroad

There is a sizable community of Black Canadians in Nova Scotia[19] and Southern Ontario who trace their ancestry to African American slaves who used the Underground Railroad to flee from the United States, seeking refuge and freedom in Canada. From the late 1820s until the American Civil War began in 1861, the Underground Railroad brought tens of thousands of fugitive slaves to Canada. While many of these returned to the United States after emancipation, a significant population remained, largely in Southern Ontario, widely scattered in both rural and urban locations, including Toronto.

So please tell me. No slavery of any kind for 200+ years in Canada and we helped many black slaves escape from their predicament in the US to freedom and yet 200+ years later they become the most violent and least successful group of people in Canada. Explain why? Explain to me why giving refuge and helping blacks has exploded in the faces of Canadians and has come back to bite them in the butt?

Quote:
Now back to the United States...answer my question. Name another group with the exact same story in this country as African Americans, and then tell me where they stand today.
Honestly I don't GIVE A DAMN about the history of blacks in America in the sense that what happened hundreds of years ago has NO BEARING on a black baby born in 2013. A black baby born today has NEVER experienced slavery and extreme oppression and never will. A baby's mind is born pure and unless its being tainted by their parents and environment, there's no reason why that baby can't grow up to be a normal, peaceful person. Yet so many blacks seem completely incapable of raising their kids to be that kind of person and yet instead of blaming it on themselves, they blame it on everything else, including their history.

I 100% GUARANTEE YOU that if you took this generation of black babies away from their black ghetto parents and gave them to white or asian parents to raise them that the overwhelming majority of them would grow up peaceful, productive and respectful and contribute to society positively rather than simply growing up to continue the cycle of crime and death that many of them are doing now.
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