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Old 10-18-2013, 05:16 AM
 
20,948 posts, read 18,970,300 times
Reputation: 10270

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But are blaming the Philadelphis School system, and Gov. Corbett for funding cuts.

This is what we've become as an entitlement nation.

The father was called, but "assumed" that she was being taken care of. The fathers girlfriend was also called, but also "assumed" that she was taken care of.

In fact, the father was so indifferent, that he said that he would take care of her when she got home!

"Daniel Burch, Laporshia’s father, is outraged. He says he received a call from the school saying that his daughter felt sick but assumed she was with a nurse. He told his daughter he would take care of her when she got home."

"Burch’s fianceé, Sherri Mitchell also received a call from the school and says that volunteers at the school told Mitchell that the girl said she couldn’t breathe.
“Why didn’t [the school] take her to the hospital?’ asked Laporshia’s father. He believes that a qualified nurse would have recognized Laporshia’s illness as an emergency."


Read more: Girl, 12, dies of an asthma attack because there was no nurse | Mail Online
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

This is a tragedy which could have been averted by parents who actually acted, instead of placing their "faith" in bureaucracy.

Why would they NOT rush to the school immediately and take care of the girl?
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Old 10-18-2013, 05:30 AM
 
Location: texas
9,127 posts, read 7,908,061 times
Reputation: 2385
Ths school could have called the parents and 9 11. If the child had fallen and broken an arm, would the school have contacted the parent and waited for the parent to act? What if the parent was not able to be contacted?

The school should be responsible for the child safety until the parent or EMS arrives; not up until the parent is contacted.
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Old 10-18-2013, 05:44 AM
 
Location: On the Chesapeake
44,899 posts, read 59,882,454 times
Reputation: 60437
Each state is different in its rules for what a school can do for a student during an emergency. Without knowing the rules in PA, or even the school system protocols, it's almost impossible from this vantage point to say who was a fault, or if anyone was. What someone would consider "common sense", no matter which side you come down on here, may not apply.

Is this tragic? Yes. Will there be lawsuits? Undoubtedly.

My question is: did the student have a rescue inhaler at school, or EpiPens (assuming this was an allergic reaction)?
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Old 10-18-2013, 05:45 AM
bUU
 
Location: Florida
12,077 posts, read 10,649,969 times
Reputation: 8793
Quote:
In recent years, in loco parentis has been used largely to justify the power of the school — to search student lockers, to require its athletes to submit to drug tests, to enforce a dress code, or to prohibit certain types of speech or conduct. At the heart of the doctrine, however, is a doctrine for a duty of care. The students have been entrusted to the school, the teachers, and the administrators, who must look out for their interest. The power of the school to regulate student conduct comes from their duty to ensure their safety and sound education.
- Greta Gao, education lawyer
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Old 10-18-2013, 05:48 AM
 
2,002 posts, read 1,159,036 times
Reputation: 1949
OP, I see you are one of those who will make everything about politics. If the girl said he couldn't breathe y should've called 911. It's as simple as that.
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Old 10-18-2013, 05:51 AM
 
35,309 posts, read 51,996,121 times
Reputation: 30998
Quote:
Originally Posted by alphamale View Post
But are blaming the Philadelphis School system, and Gov. Corbett for funding cuts.

This is what we've become as an entitlement nation.

The father was called, but "assumed" that she was being taken care of. The fathers girlfriend was also called, but also "assumed" that she was taken care of.

In fact, the father was so indifferent, that he said that he would take care of her when she got home!

"Daniel Burch, Laporshia’s father, is outraged. He says he received a call from the school saying that his daughter felt sick but assumed she was with a nurse. He told his daughter he would take care of her when she got home."

"Burch’s fianceé, Sherri Mitchell also received a call from the school and says that volunteers at the school told Mitchell that the girl said she couldn’t breathe.
“Why didn’t [the school] take her to the hospital?’ asked Laporshia’s father. He believes that a qualified nurse would have recognized Laporshia’s illness as an emergency."


Read more: Girl, 12, dies of an asthma attack because there was no nurse | Mail Online
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

This is a tragedy which could have been averted by parents who actually acted, instead of placing their "faith" in bureaucracy.

Why would they NOT rush to the school immediately and take care of the girl?
I'm not seeing the political connection here..
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Old 10-18-2013, 06:27 AM
 
25,619 posts, read 36,505,929 times
Reputation: 23291
My daughter has had asthma problems since she was a toddler. Never stopped her from competing in sports or any other activity. My wife and I made it a priority to ensure the school, teachers, administators and coaches were aware of her condition. A rescue inhaler was always at the ready even when we were not around. She had many asthma attacks over the years that were immediately dealt with no problems.

WHY? because as the parents we held ourselves responsible and not anyone else.

I've seen this pox on our Great Society towards victimhood grow and grow over the years more so with those of lessor means for whatever reason and welfare mentality.

Both the parents and the school are culpable in this case. The only one that suffered was the little girl suffocating to death while everyone around her stood by with their fingers up their asses. BOTH the parents and school faculty should be held accountable.
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Old 10-18-2013, 06:32 AM
 
Location: Stuck in NE GA right now
4,585 posts, read 12,327,284 times
Reputation: 6678
Quote:
Originally Posted by treasurefinder View Post
OP, I see you are one of those who will make everything about politics. If the girl said he couldn't breathe y should've called 911. It's as simple as that.
Ditto and why do you assume they are dems
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Old 10-18-2013, 06:33 AM
 
Location: Camberville
15,785 posts, read 21,291,118 times
Reputation: 27994
There are a million reasons why the parents couldn't come pick the child up. My parents worked over an hour from my school in elementary school. By the time they were able to finagle time off (which is not always possible) and finish up stuff in the office, it would be more than 2 hours before they could pick me up. It seems like in this case, waiting 2 hours was probably already too late. As a result, my parents had a rule: unless something was broken, I was throwing up, or the school DETERMINED IT WAS AN EMERGENCY BY SENDING ME TO THE ER, they would not pick me up. This was to curtail the old "I've got the sniffles and want to go home before a test" situation.

Today, some people have to chose between leaving to take care of a sick kid or losing their job. The article indicates that the school just told the parents that the child "wasn't feeling well." It's allergy and cold season - I haven't "felt well" in a week but still go to work every day (along with a lot of other allergy sufferers sneezing and coughing through). I don't know from the article that the school communicated that the girl was having difficulty breathing. If that was the case, especially with a known case of asthma, calling the parents should have been the 2nd phone call after calling 911 and figuring out which hospital the child would be taken to.
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Old 10-18-2013, 06:34 AM
 
25,619 posts, read 36,505,929 times
Reputation: 23291
Quote:
Originally Posted by charolastra00 View Post
There are a million reasons why the parents couldn't come pick the child up. My parents worked over an hour from my school in elementary school. By the time they were able to finagle time off (which is not always possible) and finish up stuff in the office, it would be more than 2 hours before they could pick me up. It seems like in this case, waiting 2 hours was probably already too late. As a result, my parents had a rule: unless something was broken, I was throwing up, or the school DETERMINED IT WAS AN EMERGENCY BY SENDING ME TO THE ER, they would not pick me up. This was to curtail the old "I've got the sniffles and want to go home before a test" situation.

Today, some people have to chose between leaving to take care of a sick kid or losing their job. The article indicates that the school just told the parents that the child "wasn't feeling well." It's allergy and cold season - I haven't "felt well" in a week but still go to work every day (along with a lot of other allergy sufferers sneezing and coughing through). I don't know from the article that the school communicated that the girl was having difficulty breathing. If that was the case, especially with a known case of asthma, calling the parents should have been the 2nd phone call after calling 911 and figuring out which hospital the child would be taken to.
Did the school know the child had asthma problems?
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