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Old 03-06-2014, 10:47 AM
 
Location: Annandale, VA
5,094 posts, read 5,179,239 times
Reputation: 4233

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Quote:
Originally Posted by EdwardA View Post
Retail is a pretty good indicator and office supply stores are a decent gauge of the relative health of the corporate sector.

I disagree. The reason that Staples was born was so that non-corporate people could get a deal on office supplies at the same or better discount than those being provided to large corporate customers who purchased theirs in bulk from other larger office supply companies.
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Old 03-06-2014, 10:50 AM
 
Location: Free From The Oppressive State
30,282 posts, read 23,772,836 times
Reputation: 38744
I don't know how often other people shop at Radio Shack, but I do know that the last time I went in there, many years ago, I went to buy batteries for something. All I wanted was some batteries, and at the register, they insisted that I give them my name, address, phone number, etc. Uh...no. I just want to buy batteries. I never went in and shopped there again.

While I'm no fan of that clown in the WH, the fact is, many people do their shopping online. The more that people shop online, the less that people will actually shop in a brick and mortar store.

E-Commerce Sales - Online sales rise 10.3% year over year in Q4 - Internet Retailer

Industry Statistics - E-retail spending to increase 62% by 2016 - Internet Retailer

IBM News room - 2013-12-03 Cyber Monday Goes Mobile With 55 Percent Sales Growth, Reports IBM - United States

If a business does not promote an online store, it's going to suffer. All you had to do to see that was pay attention to what happened to book stores when e-readers came out.
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Old 03-06-2014, 10:59 AM
 
Location: Pine Grove,AL
29,594 posts, read 16,577,980 times
Reputation: 6051
Quote:
Originally Posted by HappyTexan View Post
The little fish go first.
But let's just ignore it because they aren't big enough.

Boeing..600 layoffs
ToysRUs..200 layoffs
Best Buy..2000 layoffs
Sony..400 layoffs
JPMorgan..8000 layoffs
etc.


Daily Job Cuts - Layoff News , Job Layoffs 2014 / 2013 , Bankruptcy, Store closings, Business Economy News
No lets ignore them because The argument you are putting forth does not back up your claim.

Boeing is losing contracts.

ToysR Us had a business strategy of buying space in failing malls because the retail space was cheaper, as those mall begin to completely fall apart, they close down their stores, its no mystery to anyone who actually follows retail, but you are trying to make a political point while not knowing the context.

Best buy announced that they would start closing those stores in 2012, you are late to the party, or you forgot about it.

Sony only has 31 retail stores total, and their products are sold in other stores, they have no need for retail stores and as a company they lost 1 billion last year.

No clue on JP Morgan, i dont follow banks.
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Old 03-06-2014, 11:00 AM
 
Location: EPWV
19,551 posts, read 9,563,880 times
Reputation: 21318
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scooby Snacks View Post
This. On the rare occasions my husband and I go to Radio Shack, we are the only customers in the store and we always leave empty handed. We joke that the store is really a cover for a money laundering operation.
How is it that all these Mattress Discounters pop up everywhere? I've yet to see more than 1 person in there besides the employee but yet every new shopping center in my area has to have one. My spouse and I joke that it is a cover as well
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Old 03-06-2014, 11:00 AM
 
Location: Arizona
13,778 posts, read 9,673,795 times
Reputation: 7485
Quote:
Originally Posted by pch1013 View Post
Well, if they stay unemployed for more than a few days, it's their own fault. They should just pick themselves up by their bootstraps and get *real* jobs. Right?
Yeah! Thank God the Republicans killed the unemployment extension.
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Old 03-06-2014, 11:03 AM
 
11,086 posts, read 8,553,619 times
Reputation: 6392
This is the tip of the iceberg of brick and mortar store closings over the next 5 to 10 years.
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Old 03-06-2014, 11:05 AM
 
Location: Stasis
15,823 posts, read 12,480,391 times
Reputation: 8599
Quote:
Originally Posted by OICU812 View Post
They have always been a sort of etelectronic hobbyist store
Maybe in the 1980's but not for a long time. In the 1990's they were big on PCs (Compaq and their own brand) and R/C cars. Lately they been primarily phone stores with a little odd-wires section at the back - but why buy a phone and plan at Radio Shack when you can deal direct at an ATT, Sprint, or T-Mobile store? The markets they now compete in are strong but their small store format can't compete well with online, Walmart or Best Buy.
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Old 03-06-2014, 11:08 AM
 
Location: Barrington
63,919 posts, read 46,792,370 times
Reputation: 20674
Quote:
Originally Posted by Goinback2011 View Post

This is the tip of the iceberg of brick and mortar store closings over the next 5 to 10 years.
And it has nothing to do with who sits the oval or holds a majority.
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Old 03-06-2014, 11:10 AM
 
11,768 posts, read 10,273,299 times
Reputation: 3444
Quote:
Originally Posted by katzpaw View Post
Maybe in the 1980's but not for a long time. In the 1990's they were big on PCs (Compaq and their own brand) and R/C cars. Lately they been primarily phone stores with a little odd-wires section at the back - but why buy a phone and plan at Radio Shack when you can deal direct at an ATT, Sprint, or T-Mobile store? The markets they now compete in are strong but their small store format can't compete well with online, Walmart or Best Buy.
I think their online presence and marketing is their biggest weakness. For some reason I have never been to Radio Shack's website until just now and that was to confirm that they had a website. Locally, I haven't been to a Radio Shack since I was 15 - I honestly thought they went out of business.
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Old 03-06-2014, 11:17 AM
 
23,838 posts, read 23,146,110 times
Reputation: 9409
Business models are certainly a valid consideration, but lets not pretend that the economy is making great strides. When an established company is forced to close stores, its undeniable that part and parcel of that decision was the result of the lagging economy.
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