Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Politics and Other Controversies
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-10-2015, 12:39 AM
 
Location: New Jersey
16,912 posts, read 10,616,411 times
Reputation: 16440

Advertisements

We have the technology to bring back extinct animals. We can bring back the wooly mammoths, saber tooth tiger, and dodo bird, to name a few. But should we? I say go for it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-10-2015, 01:48 AM
 
Location: Old Mother Idaho
29,223 posts, read 22,424,843 times
Reputation: 23866
Quote:
Originally Posted by MJJersey View Post
We have the technology to bring back extinct animals. We can bring back the wooly mammoths, saber tooth tiger, and dodo bird, to name a few. But should we? I say go for it.
They would just go extinct again. The saber-toothed cats went extinct along with their prey long before humans ever existed, the mammoths went extinct through climate change, and the dodo bird went extinct because sailors killed them all for food. Every extinction causes a ***** in the wall. When the wall is weekend, it collapses, and another wall rises with a totally different design to hold it together.

The dod bird ate something, probably fish or the eggs of the other birds on the island, or the birds themselves, regularly. When the bird went away, the food changed. Every living thing develops its own strategies for survival. If the dodos came back, what it lived on is now gone forever, so if they would starve. All the other species have changed since the dodo's extinction.

I think we could do much better saving the present species that are quickly sliding into extinction right now. They include the African elephant, the rhinoceros, the Monarch butterfly, all tigers and lions, most species of tuna, several families of whales, and a long list of others, including many plants and trees.

All adapted to the modern world, and all are dying from mostly human created causes.

The thing is: nature abhors a vacuum. Each living species of everything occupies a niche in the environment. When that niche is left empty, then it is filled, but never in ways that can be predicted, as the environment changes as soon as the species is gone.

The Sahara desert was once a desert, then became a jungle, then became a desert once again, but a different desert than it had been before. That means the Sahara, in effect, became extinct twice, each time re-emerging as entirely different geography than what it had been.

This massive geographical change has happened over and over, everywhere on the planet. Sometimes it comes from the species that are alive at the time, sometimes from global climate change, and sometimes from major earth-changing events. Sometimes it is a combination of two or more.

There is absolutely nothing to indicate humanity cannot become extinct as soon as a few critical species of other life go away forever. Those species could be critical insects, plants, mammals, birds, or anything. When the wrong combo opens the lock, there is no way to re-lock it, and no way to predict what will be the next to go forever.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-10-2015, 01:53 AM
 
Location: Purgatory
6,404 posts, read 6,297,067 times
Reputation: 9935
Lets do it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-10-2015, 02:06 AM
 
9,418 posts, read 13,518,098 times
Reputation: 10310
Didn't anyone else read or watch Jurassic Park? ;-) Regarding Saber-toothed cats, I believe the current belief is they only went extinct 10,000 years ago, not before humans existed. With all that aside, we do not have the ability at this time to bring these animals back. If we did, someone would have.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-10-2015, 02:14 AM
 
3,201 posts, read 4,416,468 times
Reputation: 4442
Quote:
Originally Posted by TXNGL View Post
Didn't anyone else read or watch Jurassic Park? ;-) Regarding Saber-toothed cats, I believe the current belief is they only went extinct 10,000 years ago, not before humans existed. With all that aside, we do not have the ability at this time to bring these animals back. If we did, someone would have.
you're under the assumption that information about all things done in science labs around the world are available to the public

there are some species of animals i have seen that i'm sure were once science experiments
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-10-2015, 02:20 AM
 
33,387 posts, read 34,897,818 times
Reputation: 20030
the sabre tooth tiger, the dire wolf, the wooley mammoth, and other extinct species went that way for a variety of reasons. the sabre tooth tiger and the dire wolf hunted their specific prey to extinction, and they could not adapt so they died out. but as noted nature does replace these species, for instance teh dire wolf is gone, but in its place is the grey wolf, a smaller yet hardier species that is a survivor.

when man meddles in the affairs of nature, we do so to the detriment of nature. when we leave nature to its own devices, nature does very well. leave nature alone, these species are extinct, again leave them alone. because realize that if we bring back the sabre tooth tiger for instance, we also need to bring back its food supply as well.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-10-2015, 02:21 AM
 
9,418 posts, read 13,518,098 times
Reputation: 10310
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ace_TX View Post
you're under the assumption that information about all things done in science labs around the world are available to the public

there are some species of animals i have seen that i'm sure were once science experiments
I think they might be here!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-10-2015, 03:18 AM
 
Location: Unperson Everyman Land
38,650 posts, read 26,426,186 times
Reputation: 12660
Quote:
Originally Posted by banjomike View Post
They would just go extinct again. The saber-toothed cats went extinct along with their prey long before humans ever existed, the mammoths went extinct through climate change, and the dodo bird went extinct because sailors killed them all for food. Every extinction causes a ***** in the wall. When the wall is weekend, it collapses, and another wall rises with a totally different design to hold it together.

The dod bird ate something, probably fish or the eggs of the other birds on the island, or the birds themselves, regularly. When the bird went away, the food changed. Every living thing develops its own strategies for survival. If the dodos came back, what it lived on is now gone forever, so if they would starve. All the other species have changed since the dodo's extinction.

I think we could do much better saving the present species that are quickly sliding into extinction right now. They include the African elephant, the rhinoceros, the Monarch butterfly, all tigers and lions, most species of tuna, several families of whales, and a long list of others, including many plants and trees.

All adapted to the modern world, and all are dying from mostly human created causes.

The thing is: nature abhors a vacuum. Each living species of everything occupies a niche in the environment. When that niche is left empty, then it is filled, but never in ways that can be predicted, as the environment changes as soon as the species is gone.

The Sahara desert was once a desert, then became a jungle, then became a desert once again, but a different desert than it had been before. That means the Sahara, in effect, became extinct twice, each time re-emerging as entirely different geography than what it had been.

This massive geographical change has happened over and over, everywhere on the planet. Sometimes it comes from the species that are alive at the time, sometimes from global climate change, and sometimes from major earth-changing events. Sometimes it is a combination of two or more.

There is absolutely nothing to indicate humanity cannot become extinct as soon as a few critical species of other life go away forever. Those species could be critical insects, plants, mammals, birds, or anything. When the wrong combo opens the lock, there is no way to re-lock it, and no way to predict what will be the next to go forever.


Until 10,000 years ago, Simlodon and Homotherium existed alongside man. These last two saber-toothed cat varieties made their living bringing down the very large herbivores that existed at the time. Their specialized method of killing made them incapable of switching to smaller game once large game began to disappear, so any present-day reconstruction of these animals would create human-dependent zoo attractions and nothing more.

As for humans, our ability to adapt is matched only by our evolving super bugs. If we are careful, we should be able to stay a step ahead of them as well.

I don`t share your concern about our need for other animals and plant species as humans can live off so many different food varieties. This morning, I had a steak for breakfast along with a yogurt cup and several bananas. That I am able to digest all those food varieties means that I will only starve after all food sources are exhausted.

Just because these unsuccessful animals owe there extinction to events that could find their way into the human experience doesn't mean the same or similar events will impact humans in the same way.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-10-2015, 04:53 AM
 
Location: NJ
23,602 posts, read 17,283,784 times
Reputation: 17647
Perfect example of technological savant mentality which often characterizes modern day philosophy.

No consideration of perspective, total exclusion of the web of life and the intricate cascade of life that springs from the soil to involve the smallest and largest living things, be they plants or animals.

By all means experiment, as even the most random ideas can be critical to other seemingly unrelated pursuits once a common thread is discovered through analgous thought.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-10-2015, 06:54 AM
 
25,619 posts, read 36,759,249 times
Reputation: 23297
Cetain species that modern man has wiped out yes. Those that evolution choose for destruction, oh he'll no.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Politics and Other Controversies

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top