Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Politics and Other Controversies
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-16-2016, 10:09 AM
 
27,624 posts, read 21,185,911 times
Reputation: 11097

Advertisements

I believe that it certainly should.

The Great Handwriting Debate
There has been a great deal of discussion around the topic of teaching cursive handwriting in the 21st century. Research on the debate is riddled with reasons both for and against including handwriting in the curriculum. Often, it is a discussion that is not necessarily being debated by those that need to make the decisions — the educators. I am a member of an educational organization titled South Hills Area School District Administrators (SHASDA), and our last meeting’s topic was, “The Great Handwriting Debate.” This article is our combined efforts to attempt to answer the question, “Should we continue to teach cursive handwriting?”
The Great Handwriting Debate | The Huffington Post
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-16-2016, 10:11 AM
 
8,090 posts, read 6,995,570 times
Reputation: 9229
I grew up with cursive, but in reality, it's about as useful as learning calligraphy. I don't know how much time most school systems devote to it, but I'm sure that time would be better spent improving math skills.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-16-2016, 10:13 AM
 
Location: deafened by howls of 'racism!!!'
53,062 posts, read 34,880,737 times
Reputation: 29466
Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
I grew up with cursive, but in reality, it's about as useful as learning calligraphy. I don't know how much time most school systems devote to it, but I'm sure that time would be better spent improving math skills.
kind of sad to lose it, but I agree. they need to at least be able to sign their names in cursive though.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-16-2016, 10:13 AM
 
47,050 posts, read 26,155,828 times
Reputation: 29539
Not a great use of limited classroom time, as far as I'm concerned. Would make a great addition to the arts curriculum, as the article linked in the OP points out.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-16-2016, 10:15 AM
 
27,624 posts, read 21,185,911 times
Reputation: 11097
Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
I grew up with cursive, but in reality, it's about as useful as learning calligraphy. I don't know how much time most school systems devote to it, but I'm sure that time would be better spent improving math skills.
If someone wants read the most revered and valued historical American documents, they would be well served to know how to read cursive. Aside from that, it is not a bad thing for eye hand coordination and not to mention the artistic value. Too many skills and craft shave gone the way of the dinosaurs and IMO young people have suffered for it as well as the quality of most things.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-16-2016, 10:19 AM
 
47,050 posts, read 26,155,828 times
Reputation: 29539
Quote:
Originally Posted by sickofnyc View Post
If someone wants read the most revered and valued historical American documents, they would be well served to know how to read cursive.
Agree with that, but that's considerably easier to pick up than learning to write cursive. I read Gothic with ease, but I couldn't write it if my life depended on it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-16-2016, 10:20 AM
 
Location: Suburb of Chicago
31,846 posts, read 17,694,000 times
Reputation: 29387
Quote:
Originally Posted by sickofnyc View Post
If someone wants read the most revered and valued historical American documents, they would be well served to know how to read cursive. Aside from that, it is not a bad thing for eye hand coordination and not to mention the artistic value. Too many skills and craft shave gone the way of the dinosaurs and IMO young people have suffered for it as well as the quality of most things.
Absolutely, and it helps develop fine motor skills and cognitive development. I've also read that it helps children who have some disabilities.

It's foolish to get rid of cursive, in my opinion.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-16-2016, 10:24 AM
 
Location: Austin TX
11,027 posts, read 6,535,515 times
Reputation: 13259
It's a shame to see it go. As others have said, it's a great exercise in hand-eye coordination, it's an important skill in the still-important task of writing notes, cards, and letters, and when the end is nigh and our robot overlords rob us of technology it will be very useful in exchanging notes between our jail cells.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-16-2016, 10:25 AM
 
1,501 posts, read 1,732,243 times
Reputation: 1444
Quote:
Originally Posted by uggabugga View Post
kind of sad to lose it, but I agree. they need to at least be able to sign their names in cursive though.
Frankly, it seems like there is less and less need for that either. I am not even really sure what the point is when many signatures are taken these days. Like what does the illegible scribbling on a POS card reader prove? That a person with at least one arm used the card? Certainly doesn't prove that it was me. Since a signature is VERY rarely verified when it is put on paper, it would be trivially easy to do a bad "forgery" of my own signature on loan papers or such that I might later wish to claim I never signed.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-16-2016, 10:26 AM
 
27,745 posts, read 16,258,182 times
Reputation: 19178
Easy enough to learn.. should still be taught.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Politics and Other Controversies

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top