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Old 03-12-2008, 09:58 AM
 
Location: Near Manito
20,169 posts, read 24,391,674 times
Reputation: 15291

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My reason for opposing mass transit -- at least in the US -- is that would force us to spend substantial chunks of time in confined places with loud, rude people who often smell bad.

If Americans ever learned to keep their mouths shut and act like civilized human beings, and employ a little basic personal hygiene, mass transit might work.

Until then, I prefer commuting in my ten-year-old Honda Accord, bathed in the soothing sounds of Steely Dan or one of Haydn's string quartets.

Amazon.com: Josie: MP3 Downloads: Steely Dan

Amazon.com: Haydn: String Quartets, Op. 76, Nos. 4, 5 and 6: Franz Joseph Haydn,Kodaly Quartet: Music
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Old 03-12-2008, 10:08 AM
 
Location: An absurd world.
5,160 posts, read 9,189,742 times
Reputation: 2024
I find it ironic how people always try to come up with these solutions to help the economy, but they want the government to do something about it. When the government gets involved with regulating anything, taxes increase. How is that good for the economy you're trying to fix? It isn't. People need to realize that if they feel the need to make a change, do it with their own money or property. Don't try to increase taxes for us who:
A: Don't support your plan.
B: Don't want to be responsible for your ideas (taxation essentially does that).
C: See that the problem isn't the government's fault. It's the people who want change, but would rather have our taxes increased than to make the change on their own.

I amazes me how people don't see that we give way too much power to the government. People feel that the ecnonomy will one day collapse, yet they're turning to the government for help. That is beyond me.
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Old 03-12-2008, 10:13 AM
 
3,631 posts, read 10,256,327 times
Reputation: 2039
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yeledaf View Post
My reason for opposing mass transit -- at least in the US -- is that would force us to spend substantial chunks of time in confined places with loud, rude people who often smell bad.

If Americans ever learned to keep their mouths shut and act like civilized human beings, and employ a little basic personal hygiene, mass transit might work.

Until then, I prefer commuting in my ten-year-old Honda Accord, bathed in the soothing sounds of Steely Dan or one of Haydn's string quartets.

Amazon.com: Josie: MP3 Downloads: Steely Dan

Amazon.com: Haydn: String Quartets, Op. 76, Nos. 4, 5 and 6: Franz Joseph Haydn,Kodaly Quartet: Music
Oh, I forgot about this opposition, the stereotypical view that mass transit is only for poor people that can't afford a car or a shower. Thanks for reminding me.
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Old 03-12-2008, 10:26 AM
 
Location: Near Manito
20,169 posts, read 24,391,674 times
Reputation: 15291
Quote:
Originally Posted by supernerdgirl View Post
Oh, I forgot about this opposition, the stereotypical view that mass transit is only for poor people that can't afford a car or a shower. Thanks for reminding me.
There are plenty of wealthy people who are rude, uncivilized, and smelly. Heck, I'm like that after I lose a racquetball game.

Don't be so quick to jump to conclusions. You might hurt yourself.
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Old 03-12-2008, 12:28 PM
 
Location: Pinal County, Arizona
25,100 posts, read 39,337,965 times
Reputation: 4937
Mass transit works - and works well, in many areas of the country. For instance, I love the METRO in D.C.

In other areas of the country though, mass transit just cannot make it.
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Old 03-12-2008, 12:59 PM
 
1,573 posts, read 4,070,892 times
Reputation: 527
We need another 50 cent tax on gasoline. It failed at the federal level, though. Sure, gas is high but everybody in the US is paying for auto dependence and suburban sprawl. We just don't factor in the costs.

The real problem is most people in the US think suburban life and ever-expanding, snail-pace commutes are "normal". Their solution is always more of the same- fail and redouble their efforts. Build more freeways, build even farther away from city centers and aging suburbs into the exurbs.

I actually think tollways are a good idea. Most people don't pay enough for the roads they use anyways, and tollways will encourage rationing of a resource (in this case, road). On the other hand, alot of other areas suffer from a lack of good low-speed roads for access on a community level. The Sunbelt suburbs are all excellent examples of this.
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Old 03-15-2008, 07:06 AM
 
Location: Central CT, sometimes FL and NH.
4,547 posts, read 6,834,438 times
Reputation: 5990
A SMART car dealership opened in my area. I checked it out the other day. The vehicle has the potential to offer an option for short-distance commuting and address some of the congestion problems in urban areas (about 3 can fit in the space of 1 average car) but we get the inferior option here in the US.

This car only is rated for 33/41. A Toyota Corolla gets around the same MPG and seats 4, is around the same price, and is safer.

There is a turbo diesel model available in Europe and Canada that reportedly gets 65 to 75 mpg but we don't have that option here.

There is also a 1 year waiting list and the price is determined at the time of delivery. This would prevent many people from actually buying something they are not sure how much they will be paying.

10 years ago Toyota, Suzuki, and Honda offered vehicles which had highway mileage in the 50s from a gas engine. The Civic HX was one of them and was around the same price as comparable Civic models. Now we have to use a hybrid combo to derive similar mpg at a $8,000 to $10,000 cost premium. Why?

It seems to me the options should be available. Why aren't the troubled domestic automobile manufacturers stepping in to fill that need?
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Old 03-15-2008, 07:12 AM
 
48,502 posts, read 97,069,428 times
Reputation: 18310
AS the expense gets more for a SUV they will become less populkar just like in the 70's recession and fuel shortage.Just like then if some other fuekl source widely becmae avaialable peole will want he sam old vehicles.People will only use mass tranist if they have to their use to the limo thing.Blame the environmantalist for stopping the european type diesels altho I hear they are making them to confrom to our standards.It's besides diesel is not that cheap anymore. Its freedom that allows people to make the choice of a SUV and not government mandated.Some people have in fact not been as free because they have to rely on government.Governmant has no competition so they don't offer much real service as people are use to.Hurry up and wait is not just the army but all government service.
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Old 03-15-2008, 07:39 AM
 
Location: Central CT, sometimes FL and NH.
4,547 posts, read 6,834,438 times
Reputation: 5990
I to be able to make the choice of what type of vehicle I want. It just doesn't seem we're getting that choice.

Why is diesel so high now when it is a less refined product and less costly to produce? Diesel was always a cheaper fuel until about 10 years ago?

Bio diesel is a realistic option and is a cleaner-burning, renewable fuel.

I'm skeptical of just how free the markets are when oil companies are lobbying our elected officials to put up high barriers of entry to ensure a steady cash stream from existing sources until they find out a way to monetize the other options and control its distribution for their own purposes.

Chevron buys out high capacity rechargeable battries used for electric vehicles, BP takes major stake in solar, others looking at agricultural producers, etc.

If water becomes a fuel option would there be a movement by our leaders to privatize municipal reservoirs and the control of rivers and lakes?

Last edited by Lincolnian; 03-15-2008 at 07:47 AM..
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Old 03-15-2008, 08:00 AM
 
69,368 posts, read 64,267,220 times
Reputation: 9383
Quote:
Originally Posted by evilnewbie View Post
I was talking about building a million dollar house next to a low-income apartment... unless u think that would be a brilliant move. I think most people think otherwise..
I wouldnt think building a million dollar home next to any apartment complex, low income or not, a smart move.
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