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Old 10-13-2017, 06:06 AM
Status: "Human" (set 12 days ago)
 
Location: *
11,649 posts, read 3,693,449 times
Reputation: 3068

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hellion1999 View Post
I have connections in Puerto Rico and it has been over 3 weeks and you have lots of fraud from the local government employees of taking FEMA aid and not giving it to their residents and keeping it for themselves and selling it on the side. The FBI in P.R. is on the investigation.

That is what happens when you have a big central government in P.R. with 78 municipalities with its own bureaucracy each in an island of 130 x 35 miles of government corruption, fraud and abuse that don't do their jobs and expect FEMA and our military to do their jobs.

Trump put them on notice to do their jobs and don't expect FEMA and the U.S. Military to be there forever while the over-paid politicians in P.R. do nothing.


Listening to the politicians in the island, they want the U.S. to pay their debt and to give them over 50 billion in federal aid like the Marshall Plan of WW 2......they are on crack and Trump just put them on notice.
'Putting them on notice' in this context is meaningless. No amount of blustering can hide incompetence, he's out of his league here & elsewhere, he's unfit & unsuitable for his job in word & deed.
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Old 10-13-2017, 06:36 AM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
38,438 posts, read 50,015,689 times
Reputation: 50748
I have hesitated even reading this thread because so many participants have so little knowledge of emergency planning or management.

The first thing, all emergency planning is bottom up, from local to county to state to federal, not top down like some of you think. The ultimate responsibly for planning and management starts at the local level. From evacuation plans to supply logistics to everything else for immediate response.

The two acronyms, in use since WWII and the 1950s are COG (Continuation Of Government) and COOP (Continuation Of OPerations). The first came about during the war, the second at the beginning of the Cold War. The onus for preparedness is on the locals.

As far as electricity goes, it appears most of the aboveground infrastructure came down. It takes an unimaginable amount of time to clear those downed lines and poles and reset and restring the replacements. Sometime watch a crew working on an overhead electric line for a minor problem and what's involved and multiply that by hundreds of thousands. Not to mention the fact, although some of you have made it a source of humor, how isolated Puerto Rico really is and the time it takes to load cargo ships and then sail to the island. A note, boats are slow compared to trucks on Interstate highways.

For water, after 9/11 it was mandated that central water systems be equipped with backup generators for supply. There were even grants available. Some jurisdictions took advantage of that money and upgraded while others did not. Sewage systems had been required to have backup generators for at least a decade prior.

It's telling that the onsite FEMA personnel are now cutting the Mayor of San Juan out of the response. In my experience that only happens when the local becomes an obstacle. One reason I was designated as onsite coordinator at my school rather than the Principal in case of an incident.

FEMA does not usually stockpile supplies although it will begin to make arrangements to acquire supplies in advance of an incident such as a hurricane. What it does best is coordinate after incident response and write checks.

Just as a note, I've gone through all but Radiological and Biological Response Training from FEMA, although I haven't updated for about five years.
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Old 10-13-2017, 06:41 AM
 
Location: NE Ohio
30,416 posts, read 18,662,738 times
Reputation: 8949
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fiyero View Post
Trump threatens to pull FEMA from Puerto Rico - ABC15 Arizona

Everyday you think this monster can't get any worse, and yet he does something even more vile. Maybe Trump actually is the anti-Christ.
Sounds like another fake story to me. And by the way, Trump is NOT a "monster," nor is he the anti-Christ. That was the last guy.

One thing I've learned about Demorats (Leftists): They will believe any lie.

You probably thought our Founders and Framers were "monsters" and anti-Chists too. After all, they were the designers of the Constitution that Trump is defending, and our Constitutional Republic (we're not a democracy) which he is trying to restore.
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Old 10-13-2017, 06:44 AM
 
Location: Any Beach/FL
27,730 posts, read 15,834,767 times
Reputation: 11402
Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
I have hesitated even reading this thread because so many participants have so little knowledge of emergency planning or management.

The first thing, all emergency planning is bottom up, from local to county to state to federal, not top down like some of you think. The ultimate responsibly for planning and management starts at the local level. From evacuation plans to supply logistics to everything else for immediate response.

The two acronyms, in use since WWII and the 1950s are COG (Continuation Of Government) and COOP (Continuation Of OPerations). The first came about during the war, the second at the beginning of the Cold War. The onus for preparedness is on the locals.

As far as electricity goes, it appears most of the aboveground infrastructure came down. It takes an unimaginable amount of time to clear those downed lines and poles and reset and restring the replacements. Sometime watch a crew working on an overhead electric line for a minor problem and what's involved and multiply that by hundreds of thousands. Not to mention the fact, although some of you have made it a source of humor, how isolated Puerto Rico really is and the time it takes to load cargo ships and then sail to the island. A note, boats are slow compared to trucks on Interstate highways.

For water, after 9/11 it was mandated that central water systems be equipped with backup generators for supply. There were even grants available. Some jurisdictions took advantage of that money and upgraded while others did not. Sewage systems had been required to have backup generators for at least a decade prior.

It's telling that the onsite FEMA personnel are now cutting the Mayor of San Juan out of the response. In my experience that only happens when the local becomes an obstacle. One reason I was designated as onsite coordinator at my school rather than the Principal in case of an incident.
Working for Wilmas OP Blue ROOF- The FEDS take over once they land- the locals are kept abreast of the goings on but competent or not- are NOT a part of the programs. that's in PR or anywhere else. A central command is established and they run with volunteers and personnel under one command - this is where Katrina had problems not allowing the FEDs to take over-
I have over 12 co workers on the ground now - it ain't pretty-- and at this time there is not even talk of rotation. UNLESS you experienced this- please shut it - like like the blowhard tweeter- at the top.
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Old 10-13-2017, 06:50 AM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
38,438 posts, read 50,015,689 times
Reputation: 50748
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinytrump View Post
Working for Wilmas OP Blue ROOF- The FEDS take over once they land- the locals are kept abreast of the goings on but competent or not- are NOT a part of the programs. that's in PR or anywhere else. A central command is established and they run with volunteers and personnel under one command - this is where Katrina had problems not allowing the FEDs to take over-
I have over 12 co workers on the ground now - it ain't pretty-- and at this time there is not even talk of rotation. UNLESS you experienced this- please shut it - like like the blowhard tweeter- at the top.
Which is pretty much what I said. Or are you saying that locals aren't responsible for initial response?

As a question, are you referring to me as a blowhard? Really, with all the stupid in this thread? Because it sounds like you and I have a commonality of knowledge and, to an extent, experience.
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Old 10-13-2017, 07:12 AM
 
Location: Center City
7,533 posts, read 9,080,996 times
Reputation: 10928
trump doesn’t care about brown people
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Old 10-13-2017, 07:17 AM
 
4,132 posts, read 1,713,217 times
Reputation: 2689
Quote:
Originally Posted by legalsea View Post
I have seen where President Trump has stated that PR had 'major problems' with their infrastructure prior to the storm, which assertion you now repeat.


Can you cite some examples of how it was in PR before the storm?


I will be helpful in stating that 'infrastructure' refers to "the fundamental facilities and systems serving a country, city, or area, as transportation and communication systems, power plants, and schools."


Infrastructure | Define Infrastructure at Dictionary.com




For instance, it is my understanding that PRIOR to the storm 100 percent of the citizens enjoyed electrical power, safe drinking water, and cell phone service. PR had, prior to the storm, a network of roads and bridges that one could travel upon. You had functioning schools, hospitals, and government. You had ports that were open for ships, both cargo and passenger. You had a functioning airport.


Anyway, since Mr. Trump is not here to answer my question, perhaps you would inform me of the state of the infrastructure in PR prior to the storm.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sactown4 View Post
Fantastic post.
Doubt you get any responses.
Cheers, groans as Puerto Rico struggles with power outage

Quote:
Localized power outages are common in Puerto Rico given its outdated energy infrastructure,
This is from 2016. Plenty of articles like this.
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Old 10-13-2017, 07:42 AM
 
Location: Del Rio, TN
35,821 posts, read 22,140,692 times
Reputation: 22277
Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
I have hesitated even reading this thread because so many participants have so little knowledge of emergency planning or management.

The first thing, all emergency planning is bottom up, from local to county to state to federal, not top down like some of you think. The ultimate responsibly for planning and management starts at the local level. From evacuation plans to supply logistics to everything else for immediate response.

The two acronyms, in use since WWII and the 1950s are COG (Continuation Of Government) and COOP (Continuation Of OPerations). The first came about during the war, the second at the beginning of the Cold War. The onus for preparedness is on the locals.

As far as electricity goes, it appears most of the aboveground infrastructure came down. It takes an unimaginable amount of time to clear those downed lines and poles and reset and restring the replacements. Sometime watch a crew working on an overhead electric line for a minor problem and what's involved and multiply that by hundreds of thousands. Not to mention the fact, although some of you have made it a source of humor, how isolated Puerto Rico really is and the time it takes to load cargo ships and then sail to the island. A note, boats are slow compared to trucks on Interstate highways.

For water, after 9/11 it was mandated that central water systems be equipped with backup generators for supply. There were even grants available. Some jurisdictions took advantage of that money and upgraded while others did not. Sewage systems had been required to have backup generators for at least a decade prior.

It's telling that the onsite FEMA personnel are now cutting the Mayor of San Juan out of the response. In my experience that only happens when the local becomes an obstacle. One reason I was designated as onsite coordinator at my school rather than the Principal in case of an incident.

FEMA does not usually stockpile supplies although it will begin to make arrangements to acquire supplies in advance of an incident such as a hurricane. What it does best is coordinate after incident response and write checks.

Just as a note, I've gone through all but Radiological and Biological Response Training from FEMA, although I haven't updated for about five years.
I'm curious-does FEMA have any responsibility for the restoration of electrical power after a storm? I've been trying to research that and am not finding a great deal of info. From what I have found, it appears that it is the responsibility of the local power company, and that they often hire additional support and crews from other companies to assist in an emergency. I have yet to find any account of FEMA being involved in that.

As far as distribution of supplies on PR...how tough can it REALLY be? It's a small island, only ~100 miles long and maybe 20 or so wide. With a good number of ports and most of the population concentrated on the coasts. I'm not sure that it's possible to be more than 20 miles or so from a port. It's not like you're talking a mountainous area with isolated communities hundreds of miles from a population center. Amphibious landing ships can get supplies to nearly everyone.
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Old 10-13-2017, 07:48 AM
 
38,110 posts, read 24,442,661 times
Reputation: 20693
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pine to Vine View Post
trump doesn’t care about brown people
how does he magically exclude them from getting aid?

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Old 10-13-2017, 08:04 AM
 
38,498 posts, read 18,138,887 times
Reputation: 12937
Quote:
Originally Posted by moneill View Post
We don't ask or expect any other state or community to recover ALL BY THEMSELVES.

Houston's flooding issues were a direct result of Texas and the local communities failure to update their infrastructure -- why aren't we saying they should fix all by themselves.
My original post I left out the word failure.....edited.
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