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Old 01-31-2021, 05:09 AM
 
3,730 posts, read 1,768,035 times
Reputation: 3701

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Environmental Injustice is a real thing.

I know because a minority couple lives across the street and it rains over their house all day while it's sunny on my side. Maybe it's just my White Privilege.


https://www.breitbart.com/environmen...acial-justice/

 
Old 01-31-2021, 01:46 PM
 
Location: Howard County, Maryland
16,560 posts, read 10,643,864 times
Reputation: 36586
Environmental justice is one of those things that sound good in theory, and does make sense in certain cases, but doesn't take into account some real-world factors.

For example, Federally funded transit systems (which is to say, just about all of them) are prohibited from assigning the same buses to the same routes on a day-to-day basis. The theory here is that they want to prevent the transit operators from assigning the old, cruddy, run-down buses with broken A/C to the minority routes while putting the fancy new buses with the wi-fi and upholstered seats on the white routes. In the abstract, this makes sense from a fairness perspective. But then again, guess which routes are more likely to suffer from vandalism? Transit operators certainly know, and they used to put their cruddy buses on those routes instead of having to constantly repair their nice buses. But now, thanks to environmental justice laws, the nice buses and the run-down buses are evenly distributed . . . and the nice buses have to get repaired more often to fix the increased vandalism.
 
Old 01-31-2021, 01:48 PM
 
Location: Wisconsin
37,981 posts, read 22,167,958 times
Reputation: 13811
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheGoodTheBadTheUgly View Post
Environmental Injustice is a real thing.

I know because a minority couple lives across the street and it rains over their house all day while it's sunny on my side. Maybe it's just my White Privilege.


https://www.breitbart.com/environmen...acial-justice/
The politicians, race hustlers and the corporate green energy cabal, found a way to co op the weather and both get rich. And the sheeple will it this **** up
 
Old 01-31-2021, 01:51 PM
Status: "I don't understand. But I don't care, so it works out." (set 11 days ago)
 
35,637 posts, read 17,989,189 times
Reputation: 50679
OP - do you think it's not true? That impoverished people, and people of color, AREN'T more likely to live in areas near a landfill, near a stinking water treatment facility, near an electric power plant, near an airport with it's constant deafening noise?

When something obnoxious has to go in to serve the community, they are NOT going to plop it down in a side of town where wealthy white people live. Ever.

Does anyone disagree?
 
Old 01-31-2021, 02:03 PM
 
Location: My beloved Bluegrass
20,126 posts, read 16,170,612 times
Reputation: 28335
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClaraC View Post
OP - do you think it's not true? That impoverished people, and people of color, AREN'T more likely to live in areas near a landfill, near a stinking water treatment facility, near an electric power plant, near an airport with it's constant deafening noise?

When something obnoxious has to go in to serve the community, they are NOT going to plop it down in a side of town where wealthy white people live. Ever.

Does anyone disagree?
Take out the race and I will agree with you. Go to Eastern Kentucky, truly look around, and then we can discuss Environmental Justice. Hint, the most environmentally toxic areas in this state are 99+% white.

It. Is. The. Money. No one is going to put sewage plants or factories on historic horse farm land worth multi-millions of dollars, they can’t afford to purchase it. No one is going to put new factories, plants, or landfills on inner-city property either, it costs too much and there will be too much oversight.
__________________
When I post in bold red that is moderator action and, per the TOS, can only be discussed through Direct Message.Moderator - Diabetes and Kentucky (including Lexington & Louisville)
 
Old 01-31-2021, 04:39 PM
 
Location: Japan
15,292 posts, read 7,765,220 times
Reputation: 10006
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClaraC View Post
OP - do you think it's not true? That impoverished people, and people of color, AREN'T more likely to live in areas near a landfill, near a stinking water treatment facility, near an electric power plant, near an airport with it's constant deafening noise?

When something obnoxious has to go in to serve the community, they are NOT going to plop it down in a side of town where wealthy white people live. Ever.

Does anyone disagree?
It's as if people making this argument have no understanding of basic economics. Of course bad locations will have poorer people living nearby, because these are cheaper and more affordable places to live. If you're poor, and want a decent sized house, then your best bet might be an older one nearer the airport. And if you don't like living there then what's the solution? Get a better job, save some money and move to a better place. People of color, like everyone else, are free to do this.

What can society and government do?

1. Improve overall economic conditions so that more good jobs and houses become available.
2 Regulate and zone industry and housing but not to the extent that it puts a major drag on #1.

Harping about "environmental and racial justice" and teaching people to feel like they are victims only creates division and resentment.

Last edited by The Dark Enlightenment; 01-31-2021 at 05:02 PM..
 
Old 01-31-2021, 04:50 PM
 
Location: Del Rio, TN
39,875 posts, read 26,526,580 times
Reputation: 25777
Good lord. The left take stupidity to new lows every single day. Weather is racist!
 
Old 01-31-2021, 04:51 PM
 
Location: Cape Cod
24,502 posts, read 17,250,696 times
Reputation: 35800
In the old days the stinky factory used to be placed near a river or train tracks or some other strategic place that made business sense. The factories were also put into or near places that had a surplus of workers to be employed. It used to be that a factory or mine was a boom to the town because it meant good steady jobs and a trickle down economy that benefited everyone.

What happened more often then not white people worked those jobs.
Today the white folk have left those areas and the minorities have moved in because the rent and property was cheaper because it was in close proximity to the factory.



Environmental Justice Mapping sounds like the latest buzz words for Virtue signaling. It is nice they are talking about it I guess but what are they going to do? Will we see black people bused to a better neighborhood to live or work? Will the Government give them cars (electric of course) so they can move out of the city and into the suburbs?



It is sounding more and more like we are moving towards Reparations as the Left tries to rid themselves of their White Guilt. Racial Equality is now called Racial Equity and who knew it but Global warming is also racist so that needs to be dealt with as well. Maybe ol Joe can send a few Billion to Africa to help the poor people with clean water?



Environmental Justice is Racial Justice. Talk about a First World problem...
 
Old 01-31-2021, 05:38 PM
Status: "I don't understand. But I don't care, so it works out." (set 11 days ago)
 
35,637 posts, read 17,989,189 times
Reputation: 50679
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldhag1 View Post
Take out the race and I will agree with you. Go to Eastern Kentucky, truly look around, and then we can discuss Environmental Justice. Hint, the most environmentally toxic areas in this state are 99+% white.

It. Is. The. Money. No one is going to put sewage plants or factories on historic horse farm land worth multi-millions of dollars, they can’t afford to purchase it. No one is going to put new factories, plants, or landfills on inner-city property either, it costs too much and there will be too much oversight.
Yes, it's the money. And in states where there are few people of color, the poorer areas also have few people of color.

The poor have been subjected to living in areas that the wealthy wouldn't consider, for health and pollution/noise pollution/stench, etc. reasons.
 
Old 01-31-2021, 05:45 PM
Status: "I don't understand. But I don't care, so it works out." (set 11 days ago)
 
35,637 posts, read 17,989,189 times
Reputation: 50679
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Dark Enlightenment View Post
It's as if people making this argument have no understanding of basic economics. Of course bad locations will have poorer people living nearby, because these are cheaper and more affordable places to live. If you're poor, and want a decent sized house, then your best bet might be an older one nearer the airport. And if you don't like living there then what's the solution? Get a better job, save some money and move to a better place. People of color, like everyone else, are free to do this.

What can society and government do?

1. Improve overall economic conditions so that more good jobs and houses become available.
2 Regulate and zone industry and housing but not to the extent that it puts a major drag on #1.

Harping about "environmental and racial justice" and teaching people to feel like they are victims only creates division and resentment.
The first step is often to just acknowledge it's true. That the poor are subjected to environmental conditions that the wealthy aren't. Just resting with that for a moment is a good first start.

So here's what's happening in my little town.

Austin has a really terrible homeless camping population, due to a misguided push by the city council to lift the ban on people camping in public areas, i.e., under all the highway overpasses in town. Those are now tent cities. Due to some of our own homeless flocking there, and then compounded by Dallas and other cities putting their homeless on a bus and dumping them off here.

So the City Council is trying to figure out WHAT to do with all of them, and has come up with the dubious plan to purchase two hotels to provide 148 rooms, at God knows what cost to the tax payers. One of the hotels is off Burnet, which is kind of central Austin, old neighborhoods, a little sketch. Keeping it weird.

The other hotel, Candlewood Suites, is in far northwest Austin, that's wealthy and white. Well. They're not havin' it. Not for one minute. There was a protest there today, a brand new conservative member of the city council put the vote on hold to give people a chance to get really really riled up.

Just another example of wealthy people's NIMBY.

https://www.kxan.com/news/local/save...-austin-hotel/

Last edited by ClaraC; 01-31-2021 at 06:04 PM..
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