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Old 08-11-2022, 08:37 AM
 
665 posts, read 331,925 times
Reputation: 789

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I will never buy an EV so do not care.

ICE vehicles live on for decades to come!!!!
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Old 08-11-2022, 08:47 AM
 
Location: Canada
6,287 posts, read 4,147,699 times
Reputation: 7528
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mathguy View Post
CA has major looming problems as they keep banning fossil fuel using things while turning off their nuke plants and losing hydro generation capacity.

https://www.reuters.com/world/us/cal...ts-2022-05-06/

In general, they blame "climate change" for the whole mess but um...they've known about that for 30 years...and yet are still shutting off their nuke plants while increasing electrical demand.

Where will the power shortages that typically hit around 4-8PM while it's still hot but solar goes down? They'll buy at exorbitant rates from fossil fuel powered neighboring states which is why CA continues to have huge electrical price increases years after year.

This is all public info, the state power generation comittee states all these things in their annual reports.
According to your link:
Quote:
California's electricity planning has been challenged as devastating wildfires have cut off transmission lines and extreme heat events and drought have hampered hydropower supplies.
How will keeping nuclear power plants prevent wildfires from cutting off transmission lines?


I found this interesting:

Quote:
High water temperatures threaten to reduce France's already unusually low nuclear output, piling more pressure on operator EDF (EDF.PA) at a time when half its reactors are offline due to maintenance and corrosion issues.
Quote:
That is a problem because river water is often used to cool reactors before being returned at a higher temperature. Reactor production is limited during times of high heat to prevent the hot water re-entering rivers from damaging wildlife.
https://www.reuters.com/business/ene...ly-2022-07-15/
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Old 08-11-2022, 08:56 AM
 
25,293 posts, read 13,432,649 times
Reputation: 16985
Quote:
Originally Posted by midnight_thunder View Post
No, this question can be answered simply. It's just that the other posters here aren't interested in constructive conversation; they'd rather make cynical comments.

The electricity from an EV comes from your power company, and that power, today, is usually 1) natural gas, 2) nuclear, or 3) coal. A small, but rapidly growing percentage of that energy will come from solar and wind power. Some days in California (days, not nights) solar energy accounts for over 50% of energy consumed. In Texas, solar energy panels installed in the last year were credited for ensuring the power stayed on during the harsh heat waves this summer.

So yes, if you bought an EV today, odds are the electricity you put into the car was created at the source using fossil fuels. But keep in mind, that a natural gas power plant is WAAAAAAAAY more efficient at burning gas than a Ford Explorer. Even if you're getting your energy from a natural gas power plant, and using that to charge your EV, you're reducing your carbon footprint significantly. More EVs means the power grid will be more taxed, but there are solutions to this. Solar panels are a great deal these days. If more people get solar panels, more power enters the system (and those people with solar panels will save hundreds in energy costs per year). We should also consider reviving nuclear in this country. The technology is reliable, the energy is green, and it is safer than ever.
Electricity will be in incredibly high demand. Roof panels are hardly going to supply a home with enough juice especially colder climates, besides the cost of retrofitting and installation costs make that unrealistic. You need duel meters, a gigantic battery if you can afford to do that route. etc etc. Its just not viable there. We would need more nuke plants, transmission etc. Im not discounting it, but it really is waaay off in the future. Im not ready for skyrocketing energy bills and blackouts. Would like to see the clear vision, and not 'pie in the sky'
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Old 08-11-2022, 09:01 AM
 
Location: NMB, SC
25,420 posts, read 8,248,855 times
Reputation: 24407
Quote:
Originally Posted by saltine View Post
Where will the electricity for EV's come from? What will it do to the cost of electricity? Many other questions, but these are the most obvious. Sincerely wondering.
The tooth fairy probably. Honestly this administration has not laid out a plan and neither have the utilities.

If we don't have enough electricity to keep AC's running in a heat wave we will never be able to charge everyone's EV overnight.
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Old 08-11-2022, 09:02 AM
 
718 posts, read 280,129 times
Reputation: 444
The northern European countries have reached the point of saying that the only way for the powergrid to charge large numbers of electric-vehicles is with smart-chargers instead of fast-chargers.

But then the powergrid will be running at full power for longer periods of time. And when the powergrid runs for longer periods of time then the percentage of green-energy drops
.
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Old 08-11-2022, 09:11 AM
 
69,263 posts, read 52,129,748 times
Reputation: 42726
Quote:
Originally Posted by cdnirene View Post
How will keeping nuclear power plants prevent wildfires from cutting off transmission lines?
Nothing can prevent a temporary event from disrupting service.

That's not the point of typical power generation availability.

Here is a chart from the government of CA themselves.

https://www.cpuc.ca.gov/-/media/cpuc...idesupdate.pdf

Look at the top chart.
2025 column.
Notice how the yellow block of nuke power has gone away?

Now look from top down.
-7k shortfall (ie. we have no idea or plan for where that missing 13% will come from).

Two other big blocks in the tower are:
-Unspecified imports aka buying from neighboring states because you've run out and have to pay thru nose. (again, typically when CA runs into base load issues when solar stops working mysteriously in the early evening.)
-Hydro, which is decreasing due to drought but not shown decreasing so the shortfall may be larger.


So, any on topic commentary in response to the state's own projections and the trajectory?
This isn't coming from any partisan outlet, this is the state's own reports.
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Old 08-11-2022, 09:34 AM
 
69,263 posts, read 52,129,748 times
Reputation: 42726
Quote:
Originally Posted by saltine View Post
Electricity will be in incredibly high demand. Roof panels are hardly going to supply a home with enough juice especially colder climates, besides the cost of retrofitting and installation costs make that unrealistic. You need duel meters, a gigantic battery if you can afford to do that route. etc etc. Its just not viable there. We would need more nuke plants, transmission etc. Im not discounting it, but it really is waaay off in the future. Im not ready for skyrocketing energy bills and blackouts. Would like to see the clear vision, and not 'pie in the sky'
CA has had their average electricity costs since 2011 go from 30% higher than the national average to close to 80-90% now...and still increasing.

They get brutalized by having to emergency buy power on the open market....but when you outsource base load you get that.
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Old 08-11-2022, 09:35 AM
 
6,860 posts, read 1,666,737 times
Reputation: 3808
From environment Jesus.

He's the guy the left worships.
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Old 08-11-2022, 09:36 AM
 
Location: San Diego
15,926 posts, read 5,239,778 times
Reputation: 12593
Here's an interesting idea. Small, factory-made nuclear reactors ("microreactors") that can produce up to 20 megawatts (enough to power 12,000-15,000 modern homes). The can be transported on semi trucks, brought in where needed, and set up relatively quickly. When their nuclear fuel is used up (10-20 years), the entire microreactor can be removed and replaced with a new one with fresh fuel.

The would solve a lot of problems, though they wouldn't solve every problem. They would still produce nuclear waste that has to be safely disposed of. So people who insist that a solution must solve *every* problem will be unhappy. But such people are always unhappy, since there is no such "perfect" solution.

---------------------------------------

https://inl.gov/trending-topic/micro...20applications.

Microreactors
WHAT ARE MICROREACTORS?

A microreactor is a small nuclear reactor that can operate as part of the electric grid, independently from the electric grid, or as part of a microgrid to generate up to 20 megawatts thermal energy that can be used to generate electricity and provide heat for industrial applications. Most of these small reactors are designed to be portable – many could be hauled by a semitractor-trailer. Microreactors are 100 to 1,000 times smaller than conventional nuclear reactors, while small modular reactors (SMRs) range from 20 to 300 megawatts.

Microreactors offer a combination of reliability and operational flexibility that no other small generating system can match. They are expected to operate for years without refueling. Renewed interest in these very small reactors is driven by a number of factors, including the need to generate power on a small scale in remote locations, at deployed military installations, and in locations recovering from natural disasters.

Remote, rural communities in the U.S., many of which fly or truck in diesel to run generators, are considering microreactors since they could generate power on-site. Their potential use as sources of industrial process heat opens up potential new markets for zero-carbon energy for desalination, hydrogen production and other industries.
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Old 08-11-2022, 09:45 AM
 
970 posts, read 433,695 times
Reputation: 1043
Quote:
Originally Posted by saltine View Post
Electricity will be in incredibly high demand. Roof panels are hardly going to supply a home with enough juice especially colder climates, besides the cost of retrofitting and installation costs make that unrealistic. You need duel meters, a gigantic battery if you can afford to do that route. etc etc. Its just not viable there. We would need more nuke plants, transmission etc. Im not discounting it, but it really is waaay off in the future. Im not ready for skyrocketing energy bills and blackouts. Would like to see the clear vision, and not 'pie in the sky'
I live in a colder climate, and I have solar panels. Solar panels can absolutely generate over 100% of the power you consume. No retrofitting was required, and installation was included in the price. It was surprisingly cheap to install, and with the new 30% tax credit, will be even cheaper. I urge you to look into installation yourself. I think you'll be surprised by the truth.

The electric company pays to replace the meter, not you. You don't need a battery either, I agree those are a few years away from being ubiquitous. Yes, we do need more energy. But we have options. Solar panels will help. Offshore wind will help too. Keeping nuclear plants open, and opening more of them, will help even more. These aren't unsolvable problems. But once we transition, we will live in a country that doesn't rely on despots in Saudi Arabia, Russia, China, or Venezuela for energy. We will have our own, and it will be cheap.
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