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Old 01-21-2009, 09:19 PM
 
325 posts, read 448,776 times
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Ever notice how Bill Clinton and Obama constantly compare themselves to Lincoln. Both thier fathers were dysfunctional and they were abandoned as
small children.


The abandoned child overcompensates for his shame by making himself popular and indispensable to as large an audience as is possible. This is why abandoned children tend to be popular politicians and lousy leaders; they compulsively need to be all things to all people.


Underneath it all is a deep-seated feeling of inadequacy and the shame of "not being good enough," brought about by the child taking (misplaced) responsibility for the poor choices and or death of the parent.


This is why Bill Clinton and Barack Obama are compelled to identify themselves with perceived and known successes such as JFK and Abraham Lincoln, respectively!
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