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Old 04-28-2009, 03:31 PM
 
Location: Houston, TX
1,417 posts, read 2,179,584 times
Reputation: 1500

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Quote:
Originally Posted by momonkey View Post
Boo Hoo. Somebody's not happy with the trend in public opinion.
This "trend" is not statistically relevant, if we are using your quoted source. Can you find another that might be more accurate?
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Old 04-28-2009, 03:40 PM
 
42,732 posts, read 29,853,601 times
Reputation: 14345
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jadex View Post
He changed to keep his seat and admitted as much
Why did he have to change parties in order to keep his seat? Because the Republican Party turned on him and was trying to knock him out of his seat? Small wonder, then, that he decided he was better off with the Democrats.
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Old 04-28-2009, 03:47 PM
 
26,202 posts, read 48,994,276 times
Reputation: 31735
Quote:
Originally Posted by FromVAtoNC View Post
I have the same story. Former republican who got sick of the focus on abortion-abortion-abortion. If the GOP would return to being the party I once knew, I would seriously consider returning to it. But I have a feeling the party's going to die, like parties have in the past. I might be convinced to join whatever party rises from the ashes, depending on if they focus on economic issues or social issues. This could be a real opportunity for the libertarians, IMO.
I wouldn't mind seeing a third party, but I think the Libertarians are too out there with some of their views, not all. I'd like to see a middle of the road party, like Nixon's "silent majority" that is strong on Defense for sure, but also strong on balanced budgets (regardless of WHATEVER level of taxes is needed to achieve that), energy independence, health care, good schools. The ultra social conservatives can stay out on the far right fringe, and the ultra social liberals can stay out on the far left fringe, and the bulk of the nation can be at peace with itself in the middle. Easier said than done. I was hoping that Ross Perot would get us there in 1992, but that died in strange fashion.
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Old 04-28-2009, 03:52 PM
 
Location: Home is where the heart is
15,402 posts, read 28,929,148 times
Reputation: 19090
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike from back east View Post
I wouldn't mind seeing a third party, but I think the Libertarians are too out there with some of their views, not all. I'd like to see a middle of the road party, like Nixon's "silent majority" that is strong on Defense for sure, but also strong on balanced budgets (regardless of WHATEVER level of taxes is needed to achieve that), energy independence, health care, good schools. The ultra social conservatives can stay out on the far right fringe, and the ultra social liberals can stay out on the far left fringe, and the bulk of the nation can be at peace with itself in the middle. Easier said than done. I was hoping that Ross Perot would get us there in 1992, but that died in strange fashion.
I agree. I think it's more likely that a branch of the GOP will break away and form a new party. The new party will then draw an increasing number of the GOP members until it becomes the dominant party. A new party formed in this way could become very powerful, the democrats should pay attention. It would be history repeating itself, like when the Republican Party was first formed and became strong because it essentially devoured the Whig Party.
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Old 04-28-2009, 03:55 PM
 
Location: here
24,873 posts, read 36,146,706 times
Reputation: 32726
looks good on paper, but I doubt it will change much, really. He seems to be a pretty independent thinker and voter.
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Old 04-28-2009, 03:57 PM
 
Location: Texas...and proud of it.
749 posts, read 946,496 times
Reputation: 164
Ah yes, don't they call that swinging - swapping partners.
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Old 04-28-2009, 04:01 PM
 
31,683 posts, read 41,016,946 times
Reputation: 14434
Quote:
Originally Posted by rkb0305 View Post
looks good on paper, but I doubt it will change much, really. He seems to be a pretty independent thinker and voter.
As you say he is going to vote the same anyway. It is probably more psychological and is setting off currents that will in someway have a considerable impact.
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Old 04-28-2009, 04:11 PM
 
Location: Jonquil City (aka Smyrna) Georgia- by Atlanta
16,259 posts, read 24,746,901 times
Reputation: 3587
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dukester View Post
The Democratic Party is big enough to welcome moderates. Susan and Olympia, the party is open for you to join. Make the leap together!
I agree! We need to recruit them too. We are really rolling. Can you say "southern white male party" for the Republicans??
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Old 04-28-2009, 04:12 PM
 
Location: Illinois Delta
5,767 posts, read 5,012,155 times
Reputation: 2063
Quote:
Originally Posted by AeroGuyDC View Post
Gays? I think you can exclude that from the GOP agenda lol. Homosexuals and liberals thrive off of each other. I have no use for either one, at least not from a policy/agenda standpoint.
Log Cabin Republicans

Never heard of these folks? If the GOP keeps ignoring the moderate positions
of most Americans, they'll continue to diminish as a valid political entity.
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Old 04-28-2009, 04:18 PM
 
Location: Illinois Delta
5,767 posts, read 5,012,155 times
Reputation: 2063
Quote:
Originally Posted by normie View Post
I agree. I think it's more likely that a branch of the GOP will break away and form a new party. The new party will then draw an increasing number of the GOP members until it becomes the dominant party. A new party formed in this way could become very powerful, the democrats should pay attention. It would be history repeating itself, like when the Republican Party was first formed and became strong because it essentially devoured the Whig Party.
They need to purge themselves of groups like this one first.

Club for Growth - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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