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Old 01-31-2010, 01:27 PM
 
146 posts, read 112,656 times
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One year after the historic 2008 Presidential election of Barack Obama, it's quite clear that race played a major role in the 2008 Presidential election.

Because most politicians are self-serving career politicians, and not much different from each other, it's not unfair to put politics aside and look at how race impacts politics and elections:

Consider:
Most black voters chose Obama because he was black. They made a preference based on the color of his skin.
Most white voters chose McCain because he was white. They made a preference based on the color of his skin.
Other white voters chose Obama because of white guilt- they were pressured by family, friends, loved ones OR believed the election of Barack Obama would free themselves from involvement in America's past and current racism ills.
The remaining white voters chose Obama because they believed that his election would help get the USA beyond race...a far cry from reality, but these folks believed that most white people would grow to be more accepting and that black people would stop playing the race card in every hand.

A FRESH START:
When the President entered into office in January 2009, his poll numbers were very high among black voters, and most white voters of various political affiliations. The USA was off to a fresh start with a new leader. On his first day in office, he issued an Executive Order to close Gitmo. Some folks that cast their vote for Obama agreed, however, other Obama voters disagreed. These dissenting opinions by whites, as time went on, and even white Obama voters who disagreed for no other reason but opinion of policy were immediately branded as "racist" by black people. White people were also calling other white people racist toward black people. This reaction should have been expected, as it appears, many white people were indeed caught off guard by the supposed ownership of Obama by the black community. The 2008 Presidential campaign, for many people, was the first time they voted in an election featuring a black candidate versus a white candidate.

A YEAR LATER:
What we are starting to see in recent polling, is that a good number of white Democrats, white Republicans, and white Independents are losing faith in Obama. However, Obama's support among blacks of all political party affiliations remains strong. Blacks that disagree with an Obama policy decision are labeled a "sell-outs" to the black community.

Does the racial divide and separation of racial identity and ideology never allow both black and white people to share in the same success of a black President? For many years, the black community maintained a "they don't care about us mentality" toward white Presidents. Most blacks believe that President Obama truly cares about them, as opposed to most white voters that may not have put as much stock in another white President truly caring for them. With that said, does an Obama success as POTUS mean something greater to black people than it does to white people? How do historic firsts for all races measure into the life of Americans of different racial make-ups and backgrounds?

Obama's strongest supporters, have maintained their passion and support of his administration through what was a rather interesting year, because they believe they believe Obama, in the wake of Bush 43, is bringing change for the good of the country in serious times. They believe that the Obama policies and political agenda is the best way for all Americans. To these same folks, it's not all about Obama, his personal success or legacy. With so much faith in such a small group of Obama Administration folks making decisions and pushing policy, it seems that the most fervent Obama supporters believe that an Obama mandate to do what he thinks is right for the country is what we should support as opposed to "The Party of No". They also seem willing to forfeit the importance balance of power by calling for the fall of the Republican Party.

Over the past year, it appears that there is a unspoken and suppressed feeling among most whites that the black community support of Obama more geared toward black people scoring a win against white people as retribution for years of slavery and segregation in the USA, even after the white vote coast-to-coast in a largely center-right nation, was instrumental in electing Obama to the Presidency. Post election, Obama supporters will maintain that if you aren't with Obama 100%, you are against him 100%.

WHAT HAPPENED IN BETWEEN?
The Henry Louis Gates incident in, of all states, Massachusetts- only furthered this suspicion among whites. How can a man who avoided race so much in the election, pontificate on an issue he knew very little about at the time of questioning, and furthermore, choose a side? About a month later, with other mounting pressures in the country, is when the Obama honeymoon ended and his poll numbers started to drop. The Health Care debate only amplified Obama opponents and his polls among whites dipped even further. A few weeks ago, that same mostly Democratic state of Massachusetts (hint, hint) elected a Republican Senator for the first time in quite a while, less than a year after Bush 43 left office. If this sentiment keeps up in the 2010 midterm elections, has the 2012 Presidential race already been decided?

QUESTIONS IN SUMMARY:
1. Have black Obama supporters distanced Obama too from white people in general? Has the "My President is Black" mentality worn thin on white voters to the point where they no longer feel included based solely on the color of their skin?

2. Is the impact of black ownership over Obama more powerful than anything that the President himself could possibly do or say? Do the progressive academics and black leaders who say that Obama isn't doing enough for black people help Obama overall, or do they hurt him in the long run with both black and white voters?

3. Do you think Obama himself is concerned about this? From a governing process perspective? From an ability to get legislation passed during his tenure? From a 2012 re-election perspective? How history will judge him? Why or why not?

4. Is Obama capable of increasing unity between races without supporting one race or alienating another? Is it still possible for President Obama to be everyone's President, or have black people claimed him and what his historic election means to blacks too strongly for white people to feel included or for Obama to be able to push beyond this?

5. Is it even Obama's responsibility to bring about unity between races? If it's not the Presidential leadership's responsibility...where does the responsibility truly belong?

THANK YOU:
Thanks in advance for the open and honest dialogue. Many folks in the USA find it difficult to discuss, which is unfortunate. Until black people and white people can have real and honest discussion without pointing fingers and calling names, we will never progress or get beyond where we are now.

 
Old 01-31-2010, 01:50 PM
 
4,432 posts, read 6,990,303 times
Reputation: 2262
Anyway most people that voted for Obama was not of race, but of course many did, but the main reason was becuase people were fed up with 8 years of Bush administration. It was the Iraq war and the state of the economy in 2008 which was a reason why the republicans lost the 2008 election. If Hiliary Clinton or John Edwards would have ran then if it was not Obama then they would have likely to have won.
 
Old 01-31-2010, 02:18 PM
 
Location: San Jose
1,862 posts, read 2,388,577 times
Reputation: 541
"Have black people distanced Obama too far from white people?"

I think the only 'white' people that are distanced from Obama because of race were distanced from Obama because of race waaaay before the election.
 
Old 01-31-2010, 02:23 PM
 
69,368 posts, read 64,186,917 times
Reputation: 9383
Quote:
Originally Posted by Palance View Post
One year after the historic 2008 Presidential election of Barack Obama, it's quite clear that race played a major role in the 2008 Presidential election.

Because most politicians are self-serving career politicians, and not much different from each other, it's not unfair to put politics aside and look at how race impacts politics and elections:

Consider:
Most black voters chose Obama because he was black. They made a preference based on the color of his skin.
Most white voters chose McCain because he was white. They made a preference based on the color of his skin.
This is how far I got..

try again, this time without the bs...
 
Old 01-31-2010, 02:37 PM
 
Location: OCEAN BREEZES AND VIEWS SAN CLEMENTE
19,893 posts, read 18,463,342 times
Reputation: 6465
Quote:
Originally Posted by pghquest View Post
This is how far I got..

try again, this time without the bs...

And i do agree, it is bs.............. !
 
Old 01-31-2010, 02:45 PM
 
5,715 posts, read 15,054,854 times
Reputation: 2949
Default You want honest dialogue?...

To whites, ... with the exception of the skin heads and other racist groups that unfortunately share our skin color...

everything is not about race.... really it's NOT.

Like you, I look forward to the day when we can have honest dialogue about issues without everything being a racial issue but unfortunately that's not the way it is.

I would like to start by making an honest observation about this issue.

It's usually not white people who bring race into the discussion.

Last edited by World Citizen; 01-31-2010 at 03:02 PM..
 
Old 01-31-2010, 03:01 PM
 
1,463 posts, read 6,225,641 times
Reputation: 941
Lmao..amen...

and to people who think that blacks voted for Obama because he was black: are people voting for someone who understands their issues and needs. Its no different that Jewish voters supporting Lieberman, pro-life voters supporting Palin, or vets supporting Mccain.......or corporate America supporting Bush...never understood why people tried to oversimplify the black vote..


Quote:
Originally Posted by World Citizen View Post
To whites, ... with the exception of the skin heads and other racist groups that unfortunately share our skin color...

everything is not about race.... really it's NOT.

I look forward to the day when we can have honest dialogue about issues without everything being a racial issue but unfortunately that's not the way it is.

I would like to start by making an honest observation about this issue.

It's usually not the white people who bring race into the discussion.
 
Old 01-31-2010, 03:13 PM
NCN
 
Location: NC/SC Border Patrol
21,663 posts, read 25,656,592 times
Reputation: 24375
The truth about a candidate will eventually come out. Black people are not the problem of Obama. His race got him elected, but his lack of judgment and unpatriotic attitude is finally becoming so obvious that it can no longer be ignored by those who used to almost worship him. The evidence has always been there, but some people just follow the crowd and do not check for themselves. Actions do speak louder than words.
 
Old 01-31-2010, 03:43 PM
 
1,463 posts, read 6,225,641 times
Reputation: 941
Quote:
Originally Posted by NCN View Post
The truth about a candidate will eventually come out. Black people are not the problem of Obama. His race got him elected, but his lack of judgment and unpatriotic attitude is finally becoming so obvious that it can no longer be ignored by those who used to almost worship him. The evidence has always been there, but some people just follow the crowd and do not check for themselves. Actions do speak louder than words.
his race got him elected? Lmaooo

unpatriotic? I must of mis heard the part where he says "I love America" for like the 100th time

worship him? I guess if you mean longing for a political figure that can critically think issues through before making a decision...yeah I guess your right....
 
Old 01-31-2010, 04:45 PM
 
69,368 posts, read 64,186,917 times
Reputation: 9383
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zippy7fo View Post
his race got him elected? Lmaooo

unpatriotic? I must of mis heard the part where he says "I love America" for like the 100th time

worship him? I guess if you mean longing for a political figure that can critically think issues through before making a decision...yeah I guess your right....
If Obama had been white, many minorities would have voted for Clinton.

Yes, his race got him elected, its a matter of fact.. Live with it..
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