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Old 02-25-2010, 01:02 PM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
20,003 posts, read 16,659,329 times
Reputation: 3784

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Doctors threaten to turn away Medicare patients - Feb. 25, 2010
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Old 02-25-2010, 01:33 PM
 
Location: Here
704 posts, read 1,694,062 times
Reputation: 332
Greed rules all
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Old 02-25-2010, 01:38 PM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
20,003 posts, read 16,659,329 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dsrich98 View Post
Greed rules all
Greed also created cholesterol lowering drugs, MRIs, and X-Ray machines.
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Old 02-25-2010, 01:41 PM
 
Location: Chicago Suburbs
3,191 posts, read 3,959,145 times
Reputation: 1176
Quote:
Originally Posted by dsrich98 View Post
Greed rules all
and profit is bad.
We all know the mantra by now.
Quote:
Kornel, who's been in practice for 27 years, said he had always accepted Medicare patients in the past.

"But when I looked at my income from reimbursements, I was losing money every time I took care of a Medicare patient," said Kornel. "It wasn't covering my costs."
The man wants to get paid for his efforts...capitalist pig!
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Old 02-25-2010, 01:48 PM
 
114 posts, read 103,121 times
Reputation: 38
PRESIDENT OBAMA is a great admirer of the Mayo Clinic. Time and again he has extolled it as an outstanding model of health care excellence and efficiency.

“Look at what the Mayo Clinic is able to do,’’ the president proclaimed at a rally in September. “It’s got the best quality and the lowest cost of just about any system in the country. . . . We want to help the whole country learn from what Mayo is doing.’’ On the White House website, you can find more than a dozen examples of Obama’s esteem.

So perhaps the president will give some thought to the clinic’s recent decision to stop accepting Medicare payments at its primary care facility in Glendale, Ariz. More than 3,000 patients will have to start paying cash if they wish to continue being seen by doctors at the clinic; those unable or unwilling to do so must look for new physicians. For now, Mayo is limiting the change in policy to its Glendale facility. But it may be just a matter of time before it drops Medicare at its other facilities in Arizona, Florida, and Minnesota as well.

Why would an institution renowned for providing health care of “the best quality and the lowest cost’’ choose to sever its ties with the government’s flagship single-payer insurance program? Because the relationship is one it can’t afford. Last year, the Mayo Clinic lost $840 million on its Medicare patients. At the Glendale clinic, a Mayo spokesman told Bloomberg News, Medicare reimbursements covered only 50 percent of the cost of treating elderly primary-care patients. Not even the leanest, most efficient medical organization can keep doing business with a program that compels it to eat half its costs.

In breaking away from Medicare, the Mayo Clinic is hardly blazing a trail. Back in 2008, the independent Medicare Payment Advisory Commission reported that 29 percent of Medicare beneficiaries who were looking for a primary-care doctor were having difficulty finding one willing to treat them. A survey by the Texas Medical Association that year found that only 38 percent of the state’s primary-care physicians were accepting new Medicare patients.

But if you think that sounds grim, wait until Congress enacts the president’s health care overhaul. A central element of both the House and Senate versions of ObamaCare is that Medicare reimbursements to hospitals and doctors - already so low that many providers lose money each time they treat a Medicare patient - will be forced lower still.

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, a branch of the US Department of Health and Human Services, estimated last month that the Senate bill would squeeze $493 billion out of Medicare over the next 10 years. As a result, it cautioned, “providers for whom Medicare constitutes a substantive portion of their business could find it difficult to remain profitable and . . . might end their participation in the program (possibly jeopardizing access to care for beneficiaries).’’ In short, the Democratic understanding of health care reform - more government power to set prices, combined with reduced freedom for individuals - will make medical care harder to come by: an Economics 101 lesson in the pitfalls of price controls.

Nearly six months ago, the Mayo Clinic tried to sound an alarm. Instead of making American health care better and more affordable, it warned, the legislation working its way through Congress “will do the opposite’’ and “the real losers will be the citizens of the United States.’’

Each year Medicare loses tens of billions of dollars to fraud and abuse. The program’s long-term deficit is a staggering $38 trillion. Its expenditures have raced ahead of inflation from the day it was created: Medicare’s price tag has skyrocketed from $3 billion in 1966 to $453 billion this year. Yet its reimbursement of medical providers is so meager that more and more of them cannot afford to treat Medicare patients. Whatever else Medicare might be, it is no model for rational reform.

Obama says he wants the country to “learn from what Mayo is doing.’’ What Mayo is doing is trying to provide high-quality medical care in the face of Washington’s compulsively misguided interference. As 3,000 Mayo patients have just learned, government interference can hurt. Ratchet up that interference with ObamaCare, and the pain will grow worse.

Medicare and the Mayo Clinic - The Boston Globe
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Old 02-25-2010, 01:52 PM
 
3,288 posts, read 4,141,568 times
Reputation: 822
Quote:
Originally Posted by summers73 View Post
Greed also created cholesterol lowering drugs, MRIs, and X-Ray machines.
Wouldn't need cholesterol lowering drugs if people went to the ****ing gym and stopped eating garbage. It's called preventative medicine.
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Old 02-25-2010, 01:58 PM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
20,003 posts, read 16,659,329 times
Reputation: 3784
Quote:
Originally Posted by FinkieMcGee View Post
Wouldn't need cholesterol lowering drugs if people went to the ****ing gym and stopped eating garbage. It's called preventative medicine.
Not disagreeing with you in terms of obesity related illnesses. Note that tip top shape marathon runners drop dead of heart attacks and high cholesterol is partly genetic in nature. Also, brain tumors grow whether you're athletic or not.
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Old 02-25-2010, 04:27 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
90,377 posts, read 109,236,656 times
Reputation: 35920
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kappy1 View Post
PRESIDENT OBAMA is a great admirer of the Mayo Clinic. Time and again he has extolled it as an outstanding model of health care excellence and efficiency.

“Look at what the Mayo Clinic is able to do,’’ the president proclaimed at a rally in September. “It’s got the best quality and the lowest cost of just about any system in the country. . . . We want to help the whole country learn from what Mayo is doing.’’ On the White House website, you can find more than a dozen examples of Obama’s esteem.

So perhaps the president will give some thought to the clinic’s recent decision to stop accepting Medicare payments at its primary care facility in Glendale, Ariz. More than 3,000 patients will have to start paying cash if they wish to continue being seen by doctors at the clinic; those unable or unwilling to do so must look for new physicians. For now, Mayo is limiting the change in policy to its Glendale facility. But it may be just a matter of time before it drops Medicare at its other facilities in Arizona, Florida, and Minnesota as well.

Why would an institution renowned for providing health care of “the best quality and the lowest cost’’ choose to sever its ties with the government’s flagship single-payer insurance program? Because the relationship is one it can’t afford. Last year, the Mayo Clinic lost $840 million on its Medicare patients. At the Glendale clinic, a Mayo spokesman told Bloomberg News, Medicare reimbursements covered only 50 percent of the cost of treating elderly primary-care patients. Not even the leanest, most efficient medical organization can keep doing business with a program that compels it to eat half its costs.

In breaking away from Medicare, the Mayo Clinic is hardly blazing a trail. Back in 2008, the independent Medicare Payment Advisory Commission reported that 29 percent of Medicare beneficiaries who were looking for a primary-care doctor were having difficulty finding one willing to treat them. A survey by the Texas Medical Association that year found that only 38 percent of the state’s primary-care physicians were accepting new Medicare patients.

But if you think that sounds grim, wait until Congress enacts the president’s health care overhaul. A central element of both the House and Senate versions of ObamaCare is that Medicare reimbursements to hospitals and doctors - already so low that many providers lose money each time they treat a Medicare patient - will be forced lower still.

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, a branch of the US Department of Health and Human Services, estimated last month that the Senate bill would squeeze $493 billion out of Medicare over the next 10 years. As a result, it cautioned, “providers for whom Medicare constitutes a substantive portion of their business could find it difficult to remain profitable and . . . might end their participation in the program (possibly jeopardizing access to care for beneficiaries).’’ In short, the Democratic understanding of health care reform - more government power to set prices, combined with reduced freedom for individuals - will make medical care harder to come by: an Economics 101 lesson in the pitfalls of price controls.

Nearly six months ago, the Mayo Clinic tried to sound an alarm. Instead of making American health care better and more affordable, it warned, the legislation working its way through Congress “will do the opposite’’ and “the real losers will be the citizens of the United States.’’

Each year Medicare loses tens of billions of dollars to fraud and abuse. The program’s long-term deficit is a staggering $38 trillion. Its expenditures have raced ahead of inflation from the day it was created: Medicare’s price tag has skyrocketed from $3 billion in 1966 to $453 billion this year. Yet its reimbursement of medical providers is so meager that more and more of them cannot afford to treat Medicare patients. Whatever else Medicare might be, it is no model for rational reform.

Obama says he wants the country to “learn from what Mayo is doing.’’ What Mayo is doing is trying to provide high-quality medical care in the face of Washington’s compulsively misguided interference. As 3,000 Mayo patients have just learned, government interference can hurt. Ratchet up that interference with ObamaCare, and the pain will grow worse.

Medicare and the Mayo Clinic - The Boston Globe
Just who do you think is committing fraud? People talk about medicare fraud like Grandma and Grandpa are defrauding the govt., but in acutally it is organized crime that is committing a large part of it. Practioners (read, physicians) also commit a lot of Medicare fraud.

PolitiFact | Coburn says 20 percent of every Medicare dollar goes to fraud

Fraud statistics (http://www.insurancefraud.org/medicarefraud.htm - broken link)
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Old 02-25-2010, 04:43 PM
 
Location: Southcentral Kansas
44,884 posts, read 30,115,832 times
Reputation: 4269
Quote:
Originally Posted by FinkieMcGee View Post
Wouldn't need cholesterol lowering drugs if people went to the ****ing gym and stopped eating garbage. It's called preventative medicine.
I guess you haven't heard that some of us inherited our cholesterol storing abilities. My mother had it and so do I. I lift weights, ride my stationary bike in cold weather and walk very fast in warm weather and still need my Vytorin to hole it down. Maybe you need to look up the fact that Vytorin works on both cholesterol and triglycerides. It is not all eating less than healthful foods since I do that too.
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Old 02-25-2010, 04:55 PM
 
Location: Southcentral Kansas
44,884 posts, read 30,115,832 times
Reputation: 4269
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Just who do you think is committing fraud? People talk about medicare fraud like Grandma and Grandpa are defrauding the govt., but in acutally it is organized crime that is committing a large part of it. Practioners (read, physicians) also commit a lot of Medicare fraud.

PolitiFact | Coburn says 20 percent of every Medicare dollar goes to fraud

Fraud statistics (http://www.insurancefraud.org/medicarefraud.htm - broken link)
The thing about Medicare that I dislike most is that payments are determined by bureaucrats who know so little about medicine. When I see the amounts they pay to physicians for office visits compared to what they pay them for procedures in hospitals I really get sick. I don't mind the amounts they pay for office calls but sometimes they are just too much money. They need to pay more for the kinds of things that Mayo does and maybe a bit less for office calls.

All I have seen from that article is that Mayo won't be taking on any new Medicare patients. I guess if you aren't already there you have to be a bit fearful of having to pay for your treatment. That makes me think about my practitioner who does my annual (now bi-annual) endoscopy. He is nearing 65 himself and will want to retire some day soon and maybe too soon for me. He gets paid about 2/3 of what he asks Medicare for and makes up for that by hitting those with insurance hard enough to make up for what Medicare kept back. I blame Medicare for a lot of the high cost of health care these days and it is the bureaucratic manner it is run.
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