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Old 03-26-2010, 02:00 PM
 
Location: Stillwater, Oklahoma
23,124 posts, read 16,214,293 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the one View Post
i dont think it will pass.
Why not? Do plenty of Californians think trying to get their legalized medical marijuana regulated has been a big mess?
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Old 03-26-2010, 02:04 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StillwaterTownie View Post
Why not? Do plenty of Californians think trying to get their legalized medical marijuana regulated has been a big mess?
Has nothing to do with that, there are large pockets in rural CA that are very conservative, who knows how they'll vote.
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Old 03-26-2010, 02:22 PM
 
Location: Earth
17,444 posts, read 25,633,381 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FinkieMcGee View Post
Has nothing to do with that, there are large pockets in rural CA that are very conservative, who knows how they'll vote.
Many of those areas of rural CA are big marijuana growing areas and would stand to economically benefit from legalization.

Party affiliation doesn't explain everything. Look at all the pro-life Democrats in the Midwest, Pennsylvania, the South, and Texas.

The only way I see this initiative not passing is if its supporters run a completely inept campaign.
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Old 03-26-2010, 02:33 PM
 
Location: Stillwater, Oklahoma
23,124 posts, read 16,214,293 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FinkieMcGee View Post
Has nothing to do with that, there are large pockets in rural CA that are very conservative, who knows how they'll vote.
Oh, yeah, they're probably decendants of Okies from the Dust Bowl like Kern County.
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Old 03-26-2010, 02:37 PM
 
3,288 posts, read 4,150,302 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by majoun View Post
The only way I see this initiative not passing is if its supporters run a completely inept campaign.
This is not outside the realm of possibility. Prop 8 is a pretty good example.
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Old 03-26-2010, 03:22 PM
 
1,791 posts, read 1,659,380 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sacredgrooves View Post
I definitely lean right, but have no problem with legalizing it. Alcohol is far worse, and frankly there are so many normal functioning adults that smoke it anyway it is just senseless to criminalize it. Complete waste of our money, resources, and prison space. We might as well reap tax rewards from it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by FinkieMcGee View Post
This is such a no brainer issue, but for all I know it will get shot down. The war on drugs was always a failure, this is one step towards righting that.
Quote:
Originally Posted by brubaker View Post
One this issue I totally go right wing. Why tax and regulate something they should just legalize and be done with?
Trying to get a cut of something that I grow on my own land with my own two hands (cutting out the drug cartels) ... is crazy talk.

They'll get their $$$ from all those DEA agents who send their kids to private schools on the money they earn locking up otherwise harmless citizens for letting some steam off with a joint every other day.

People complain about a loss of 'productivity' if it's legalized.... but I think a person behind bars is about the least productive person I can possibly imagine.

Etc.

It should have been legalized 15 years ago.
I agree with all the above. This a tired subject. If this passes, other states will surely follow suit. It's hard to tell how it would work though, since it's so easily grown. The only reason it's not legal yet IMO, is because the Gov. always wants their taxes on sold goods. (no pun intended) Because anyone with half a brain knows, alcohol, prescription drugs, and all the "real" drugs are deadly. Not marijuana. Here's proof.


Myths and Facts About Marijuana
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Old 03-26-2010, 05:27 PM
 
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I think it's funny how people always say, "it's so easy to grow". Why do you think there is a such price difference from outdoor bulk marijuana that is grown in quantities as opposed to specific strains that are grown, cultivated, harvested and cured with much needed attention? It would literally require manpower throughout the week to care for and cultivate more than 20 plants a week. That is why NorCal is more successful because the geography and soil is comparable to the organic soil that is required to grow a successful and promising strain.

Aside from that, I am speaking as an outsider of CA. I am from TN. I am for the legalization, or AT LEAST just the decrimilization. I don't think people take into consideration the effects that occasional marijuana use and being arrested as a felon has on our youth, especially within the black and hispanic society. In Tennessee, if say a 19 year old is found with possession with over an ounce of Marijuana, he can and will be arrested as a felon. This will be on his record for the rest of his life, hindering him from scholarships, possibly college, corporate or other jobs that frown upon a felony on a background. I've seen it many times, friends and acquintances resorting to dead end jobs due to problems that arrose in our hay days of 18-21. While we have the same levels of education, being that I was lucky enough to not have the same run ins with the law, I am able to maintain a job in corporate society while they have to work twice as hard up in factories and trades.
It is sad that a 18 year old that gets drunk at a party, crashes his car and injures 3 friends can get away with misdeameanor charges, but a fellow teen who gets arrested after purchasing an oz. of marijuana gets a felony charge that scars him for the rest of his life.

There is going to be ups and downs with the legalization. The pros outweigh the cons in my opinion. I am in the hopes that CA continues to push this law into motion and set a trend for the rest of America.
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Old 03-26-2010, 05:30 PM
 
3,288 posts, read 4,150,302 times
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Alcohol is "easier" to make than it is to grow weed, I don't know of many people who are homebrewing because it's cheaper than buying beer.
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Old 03-26-2010, 05:49 PM
 
1,747 posts, read 1,810,298 times
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It just seems that in more recent times......poll after poll regarding marijuana legalization has shown that the majority of Americans (around 2/3rds) of the population are in support of pot leagalization for adults.....or decriminalization at the very least.

Not just for medicinal purposes either, but for recreation as well.

Yeah, the alcohol and tobacco industry sure don't like this idea....unless there would be something in it for them.

But, it only makes sense for any fiscally conservative, freedom-loving, American who believes in the US Constitution and what the founding fathers had "envisioned for our citizenry as a freedom" to be AGAINST ANY FURTHER GOVT. EXPANSION......to control and oppress freedom and ignore the Constitution.

This is why I believe the issue of marijuana legalization is a GREAT example of the separation of powers. State and Federal....and a prime ex. of WHY State's Rights have taken a backseat to Fed. law. and a Supreme Court that chooses not to want to truly debate the issue.

For it to remain illegal, and the status quo to continue with it, etc. ONLY shows the hypocrisy and true colors of BOTH parties politician's and society, in general.....when there are likely, 50 MILLION REGULAR marijuana smokers in the US!

State's RIGHTS?

OR.....Federal LAW trumping them.....first and foremost?

Decision already made?
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Old 03-26-2010, 06:32 PM
 
Location: Michigan
412 posts, read 375,325 times
Reputation: 185
With something like marijuana, I just don't think keeping it illegal is worth the effort. It's no worse than tobacco or alcohol, and keeping it illegal costs more than it's worth.
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