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Old 09-07-2014, 01:28 PM
 
Location: Maine
18,598 posts, read 22,371,379 times
Reputation: 22467

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Quote:
Originally Posted by the relocater View Post
I am interested in moving to maine portland is a possibilty are the doctors good and is it safe
Health care in Maine is fantastic.

Safe ... ? Compared to what?

Portland has the highest crime rate in Maine, but that still makes it very low compared to other metropolitan areas. Portland's most dangerous neighborhoods are safer than Tacoma's safest neighborhoods.
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Old 09-08-2014, 12:03 PM
 
447 posts, read 516,030 times
Reputation: 311
I agree sounds like a nice city but seems a bit expensive? My biggest concern is heating during winter months after paying 600 dollar cooling bills in california I can't take high utilities any more.
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Old 09-24-2014, 11:17 AM
 
10 posts, read 34,304 times
Reputation: 24
It is very safe. Bayside and West Bayside, maybe Parkside, are probably areas you want to stay out if you're worried about safety - but even these areas are nothing like serious city issues, just a lot of homeless, drugs, alcohol and stealing amongst their circles.

Doctors...hmmm...I have had very good experiences but that's all relative.
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Old 09-29-2014, 10:13 PM
 
974 posts, read 1,929,208 times
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I have to add this little tidbit about Maine. I was up in Portland on business and it was the first time I'd been there. One night I had an invite to meet some folks at a popular restaurant on the main street along the harbor. It was raining and parking was hard to come by. I finally found a slot and pulled in...it had a meter. Well I didn't know if I needed to feed the meter and I sure didn't want to get ticketed and/or towed. As I was trying to feed the meter, an apparent homeless guy or drifter was leaning from a closed-store doorway and in a Maine accent said: "You don't need to feed the meter after 6pm".
He said it politely and I was surprised. Anyway... he added, "...but as long as you have your change out, mind sparing me a couple quarters? I'm working on getting a pint and I'm getting pretty close."

How could I resist? While I don't encourage panhandlers, I found the street people in Portland among some of the most polite I've ever encountered. Not pushy or aggressive as in some areas.
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Old 06-13-2015, 01:30 AM
 
8 posts, read 7,537 times
Reputation: 15
Great thread. Love all the insights.
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Old 07-02-2015, 06:09 AM
 
8 posts, read 11,552 times
Reputation: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by BeenThereDunThat View Post
I have to add this little tidbit about Maine. I was up in Portland on business and it was the first time I'd been there. One night I had an invite to meet some folks at a popular restaurant on the main street along the harbor. It was raining and parking was hard to come by. I finally found a slot and pulled in...it had a meter. Well I didn't know if I needed to feed the meter and I sure didn't want to get ticketed and/or towed. As I was trying to feed the meter, an apparent homeless guy or drifter was leaning from a closed-store doorway and in a Maine accent said: "You don't need to feed the meter after 6pm".
He said it politely and I was surprised. Anyway... he added, "...but as long as you have your change out, mind sparing me a couple quarters? I'm working on getting a pint and I'm getting pretty close."

How could I resist? While I don't encourage panhandlers, I found the street people in Portland among some of the most polite I've ever encountered. Not pushy or aggressive as in some areas.
Please, tell us more about your experience in Portland. Is so nice as it looks like?? How is the sping? What sports can you practise depending on the season of the year? How is deal with winters?? Thank you very much.
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Old 07-02-2015, 07:55 AM
 
171 posts, read 166,002 times
Reputation: 293
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark S. View Post
About New Englanders not liking outsiders...

That's not true at all for 99% of New Englanders. But there is a very distinct cultural difference between New Englanders and southerners. Southerners are more outgoing and open. New Englanders are more reserved. New Englanders have pretty strict boundaries and social protocol. Here's how a conversation might go in New England.

Me: "How are you?"

Neighbor: "Pretty well. My daughter has been sick, but she's doing better now."

Okay, that's the cue that her daughter being sick is now open for conversation. I can ask about it, show concern, offer help, and it will be appreciated and reciprocated because the neighbor has let me know it's okay to ask about it. However, had the conversation gone something like this:

Me: "How are you?"

Neighbor: "Fine. How are you?"

Me: "Good thanks. I hear your daughter has been sick. How is she?"

Now there, even though I meant well, I may have offended because the neighbor didn't bring up a matter that she considers private. To her, I should have minded my own business. She probably won't be rude at the moment, but she's going to become more stand-offish because she now considers me nosy and not respecting her boundaries.

This is absolutely foreign to southerners. Where I grew up in the Southwest, nothing was sacred. Everything was open for conversation, because it showed concern and neighborliness.

So it's not that New Englanders are unfriendly. They are just more private and have different social protocols.
FWIW to the OP, and with all due respect to Mark S., I'm a Maine native and I think this is absurd. In this situation, unless the daughter is sick for some embarrassing reason that people outside of the family aren't supposed to know about, I can't imagine most Mainers would think you overstepped the bounds of normal social interactions. The general rule is probably closer to it being perfectly okay to ask about something that is both common knowledge and isn't embarrassing for the person being asked or about whom the questioner is inquiring.

In other words:
Don't ask Judy how her husband's DUI turned out if you're not good enough friends with Judy for that to not seem offensive. BUT, feel free to ask Jim how his wife is doing after her much-anticipated back surgery. Bonus points if you offer any help that might be needed!

The closeness of your relationship with the person and the subject matter of the situation is a far more important determinant of the boundaries of that conversation than some kind of weird permission that must be granted first.
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Old 07-06-2015, 12:44 PM
 
Location: Maryland not Murlin
8,249 posts, read 23,123,267 times
Reputation: 6276
Quote:
Originally Posted by tarheart009 View Post
Just curious, but what is Portland, Maine like? Do they like outsiders? Because I know New England doesn't like outsiders sometimes.
Yes, they like "outsiders". Unlike the rest of Maine, you won't get the you are "from away" attitudes and likely you will meet many people who transplanted from other States.
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Old 07-20-2015, 07:41 PM
 
695 posts, read 682,625 times
Reputation: 568
Portland, Maine is a beautiful city, with a gritty side. It feels a lot larger than 66,000. I've been here 2 years and agree with most of the posters on this thread. Most people are very polite and helpful, and when you see a car speeding along on the highway, or cutting in front of others, it's usually an out of state plate...

The Old Port is very charming and there are always tourists walking around, so it's lively and fun in the warmer weather. On the down side, things are expensive here. For example, the Tall Ships were here this weekend, and they were charging $15 per day, to tour any of the ships. That seemed a bit steep, but what bothered me (and many tourists I talked with), was that they were charging the $15 just to LOOK at the ships from the outside on the pier. You couldn't even walk up to the ships without paying $15 per person, kids included, which I thought was over the top. I ended up touring the US coast guard ship in port which was free and fun.

Beaches are really nice and easy to get to from Portland, but parking at the beach during the summer is nearly impossible and very expensive. Off season is a better bet, unless you are into swimming in the ocean during high season. The coast itself is just gorgeous, especially as you drive north.

Anyway, in general, Portland is a pricey place: rents are very high on the peninsula (17% increase this last year according to Press Herald), utility costs are high (some older buildings have oil furnaces and even nat gas is high due to a shortage of pipelines), electric rates are some of the highest in New England, gasoline is high (New England prices) compared to other parts of the US, except the west coast, restaurants are pricey, seafood is expensive, even at the "shacks" along the coast. If you have the resources to live on the south coast of Maine, it is a lovely place, but costly. I'm sure there are less expensive places to live in Maine away from the coast, but utilities will be steep anywhere in Maine with the brutal winters.

One other observation: the city of Portland seems to have a skewed demographic, mostly high income or low income. There appears to be a fairly high number of lower income folks on the peninsula living in run down apartments, along with a high number of panhandlers and "homeless" walking around, sleeping in the parks and panhandling on medians. There are also a high number of "transitional" houses on the peninsula with recovering addicts, some with supervision. The city has several homeless shelters as well.

In addition, there are a substantial number of immigrants (mostly from Somalia) in Portland, and then a fairly small number of wealthy (mostly on the far East End or West End). What is missing is the middle class. The people who work downtown in the hotels or in government or in schools or local businesses, live in other towns. This was a surprise to me.

People are generally nice to outsiders, but reserved. It has a definite New England vibe (takes a while for natives to warm up to newcomers), but other transplants are very friendly. Winters are brutal, though the city does a good job clearing and removing snow. Parking on the streets is very challenging any time of year and they do tow cars regularly.

All in all, Portland is a great little city, and for newcomers with $$, it has a lot to offer with its galleries, a small art museum, many good restaurants, good city services, a charming Old Port with many local shops and a lively harbor and waterfront.
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Old 07-21-2015, 03:43 AM
 
130 posts, read 99,962 times
Reputation: 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by olderandwiser456 View Post
Portland, Maine is a beautiful city, with a gritty side. It feels a lot larger than 66,000. I've been here 2 years and agree with most of the posters on this thread. Most people are very polite and helpful, and when you see a car speeding along on the highway, or cutting in front of others, it's usually an out of state plate...

The Old Port is very charming and there are always tourists walking around, so it's lively and fun in the warmer weather. On the down side, things are expensive here. For example, the Tall Ships were here this weekend, and they were charging $15 per day, to tour any of the ships. That seemed a bit steep, but what bothered me (and many tourists I talked with), was that they were charging the $15 just to LOOK at the ships from the outside on the pier. You couldn't even walk up to the ships without paying $15 per person, kids included, which I thought was over the top. I ended up touring the US coast guard ship in port which was free and fun.

Beaches are really nice and easy to get to from Portland, but parking at the beach during the summer is nearly impossible and very expensive. Off season is a better bet, unless you are into swimming in the ocean during high season. The coast itself is just gorgeous, especially as you drive north.

Anyway, in general, Portland is a pricey place: rents are very high on the peninsula (17% increase this last year according to Press Herald), utility costs are high (some older buildings have oil furnaces and even nat gas is high due to a shortage of pipelines), electric rates are some of the highest in New England, gasoline is high (New England prices) compared to other parts of the US, except the west coast, restaurants are pricey, seafood is expensive, even at the "shacks" along the coast. If you have the resources to live on the south coast of Maine, it is a lovely place, but costly. I'm sure there are less expensive places to live in Maine away from the coast, but utilities will be steep anywhere in Maine with the brutal winters.

One other observation: the city of Portland seems to have a skewed demographic, mostly high income or low income. There appears to be a fairly high number of lower income folks on the peninsula living in run down apartments, along with a high number of panhandlers and "homeless" walking around, sleeping in the parks and panhandling on medians. There are also a high number of "transitional" houses on the peninsula with recovering addicts, some with supervision. The city has several homeless shelters as well.

In addition, there are a substantial number of immigrants (mostly from Somalia) in Portland, and then a fairly small number of wealthy (mostly on the far East End or West End). What is missing is the middle class. The people who work downtown in the hotels or in government or in schools or local businesses, live in other towns. This was a surprise to me.

People are generally nice to outsiders, but reserved. It has a definite New England vibe (takes a while for natives to warm up to newcomers), but other transplants are very friendly. Winters are brutal, though the city does a good job clearing and removing snow. Parking on the streets is very challenging any time of year and they do tow cars regularly.

All in all, Portland is a great little city, and for newcomers with $$, it has a lot to offer with its galleries, a small art museum, many good restaurants, good city services, a charming Old Port with many local shops and a lively harbor and waterfront.



nice to hear that !

now i would ask about the wether in Portland?


The city I live in is Stockholm (windy place):
And
(winter in general) dec-feb is always cold, some snow often around 30-45 cm on the ground, MAX 3-5 days with -20, often the temp at day are 0 and at night around -5 to -10

mars-may, often mild, the snow begin to melt around 20 march, the last frost occur 5 may often, and the averagetemp for the all three month is 10 at day and around 0 at night, and often WINDY

jun-sep often warm, days are often around 20+ and night often around 10+, sometimes IF GOD will 30-35+ but it occur only MAX 3- 14 days! the whole summer is a mix of rain,cloudy and sunny! and frost occur often in 28 sep!

oct-nov is REAL AUTUMN, often mild to cold, days around 15-10+ and night around 0 to -10, some times the snow can some in mid of october but often in the last of NOVEMBER!

Is portland the same?????
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