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Old 07-23-2008, 10:39 PM
 
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I wasn't sure where to post this kind of thread, but what are the winters like in New York and New England?
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Old 07-24-2008, 03:55 AM
 
Location: Tolland County- Northeastern CT
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What part of New York state? What part of New England? There is a fair amount of variability of winter through both regions.

Since this is the Maine forum- I will concentrate on New England- you can ask about winter in New York state on the NYC Forum or NY State forum.


Southern New England- Connecticut, eastern Massachusetts and Rhode Island will have the mildest winter conditions with coastal regions of these areas the mildest of all.

Snow fall in inland Connecticut around Hartford averages around 43" a year, where along Long Island sound 20-25". Temperatures in inland Connecticut around Hartford sometimes will drop to zero- but this is not common anymore- Connecticut's most rigorous winter conditions are confined to the northwest hills- and the conditions here will be considerably milder then Vermont, most of New Hampshire and Maine.

Rhode Island around Providence also has a mild winter- as does the RI coast- with temps at or below zero uncommon and light snowfall. Boston proper, Cape Anne, the south shore, and Cape Cod have mild winters- with heaviest snow to the north, northwest of Boston and northwest of Providence into central Mass at Worcester.

Central Massachusetts west of Boston, to Worcester to the Berkshire hills will have more cold and snow then areas to the south and east.

Vermont has a rigorous 4 season humid continental climate with cold winters and much snow- though southern VT will be milder then to the north. New Hampshire is similar to Vermont- though southeastern Vermont near the seacoast is milder.

Maine, along the coast from the NH border to about mid coast- this includes greater Portland having a climate that has less snow and less intense cold then areas further inland.

Interestingly enough from wikipedia on Connecticut's climate

Parts of Connecticut, including northwestern Connecticut, have a Humid continental climate while other parts, especially southeastern Connecticut, have a Humid subtropical climate, with seasonal extremes tempered by its proximity to the Atlantic Ocean. Winters are cold, with average temperatures ranging from 31°F (−1°C) in the southeast to 23°F (−5°C) in the northwest in January. The average yearly snowfall is about 25–100" (64–254 cm) across the state, with higher totals in the northwest. Spring has variable temperatures with frequent rainfall. Summer is hot and humid throughout the state, with average highs in New London of 81°F (27°C) and 87°F (31°C) in Windsor Locks. Fall months are mild, and bring foliage across the state in October and November. During hurricane season, tropical cyclones occasionally affect the region. Thunderstorms are most frequent during the summer, occurring on average 30 times annually. These storms can be severe, though tornadoes are rare.

The 'humid subtropical' climatic tpye in Connecticut follows roughly I 84 in the state- the area to the north more continental- the area to the south more subtropical. The subtropical climate type also now extends into most of Rhode Island and south eastern Massachusetts.

Last edited by skytrekker; 07-24-2008 at 04:04 AM..
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Old 07-24-2008, 07:07 AM
 
Location: Maine
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There's a big difference between winter in Portland and Fort Kent. Are you looking for info just on the Portland area of Maine or other parts of the state?
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Old 07-24-2008, 07:41 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Maine Writer View Post
There's a big difference between winter in Portland and Fort Kent. Are you looking for info just on the Portland area of Maine or other parts of the state?
I was looking for the Portland area.
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Old 07-24-2008, 07:58 AM
 
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Because of the proximity to the ocean Portland winters are milder than the inland parts of the states. I lived in North Eastern PA and things here seem pretty similar to there in winter. Not an easy winter but not awful.

If you are moving up here convince yourself that it will be worse than any winter you can imagine, then when it is not as bad as all that you'll be happy. That's what happened to us, coming up last fall with all the dire winter warnings from people who had no idea why we'd ever want to move to Maine. We hit one of the biggest winters for snowfall since they started recording these things. I was mentally prepared for it to be bad so I kind of liked all the snow. Must confess though that when I say this in front of my husband he points out that it was not me shoveling.
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Old 07-24-2008, 01:44 PM
 
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Originally Posted by genmomto5 View Post
Because of the proximity to the ocean Portland winters are milder than the inland parts of the states. I lived in North Eastern PA and things here seem pretty similar to there in winter. Not an easy winter but not awful.

If you are moving up here convince yourself that it will be worse than any winter you can imagine, then when it is not as bad as all that you'll be happy. That's what happened to us, coming up last fall with all the dire winter warnings from people who had no idea why we'd ever want to move to Maine. We hit one of the biggest winters for snowfall since they started recording these things. I was mentally prepared for it to be bad so I kind of liked all the snow. Must confess though that when I say this in front of my husband he points out that it was not me shoveling.
You can count on winter being as bad if not worse than last year. The sunspot count is zero, the sun is at it's minimum output and winter will be long ,cold and snowy again!
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Old 07-24-2008, 06:17 PM
 
Location: Teton Valley Idaho
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maineah View Post
You can count on winter being as bad if not worse than last year. The sunspot count is zero, the sun is at it's minimum output and winter will be long ,cold and snowy again!
yes!! bring it on! D
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Old 07-24-2008, 07:28 PM
 
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Originally Posted by mollysmiles View Post
yes!! bring it on! D
Be careful what you ask for!
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Old 07-27-2008, 06:32 PM
 
Location: Maine
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I'm with mollysmiles! Bring it on!

Portland winters can see a lot of snow, but New Englanders are so prepared for it. Last winter, we had what all the old-timers were calling an unusually harsh winter, and there was only one day where I felt like it was wise to stay inside. When the flakes start falling, the plows are out, and the roads are pretty well maintained.
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Old 11-13-2008, 02:52 PM
 
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Winter weather can vary like any other northeastern state. The first winter we experienced there was 6 inches of ice on the side streets in Portland that stayed all winter. I haven't seen that again in the 32 years I have been here. I stuck around for more!
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