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Old 02-12-2018, 03:37 PM
 
3,939 posts, read 3,993,300 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PNW-type-gal View Post
Museums, theater, nightlife, a larger selection of restaurants - all the big city things. Sure, there is some of that in Portland, but nowhere near the same scale. But if someone is not particularly attracted by those things, prefers the outdoors, then most of the PNW would be a better choice. Also the job situation is better in a larger place, just out of sheer numbers.

I don't actually want to live in a big city (heck, Portland got too big and crowded for me) but I like visiting them.
Good points. My kid’s teachers are younger than I am, in their 30’s, but they love the lifestyle The PNW offers them and they are working in their desired field for a great school district. I have to remember that many younger folk don’t want nightlife or a fast, big city, which is what I wanted when I left SF for NYC in the 90’s. The trend for milinnials is a move to the suburbs to buy first homes so maybe it’s partly generational. The OP should consider weather and lifestyle pace when deciding between Portland and Chicago.
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Old 02-18-2018, 03:21 AM
 
Location: Chicago
31 posts, read 21,202 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by USDefault View Post
If you are certain about this, then perhaps you should let this be the key deciding factor, at least for now.

Yes and yes.

I hate Chicago, and like the greater Portland metro area very much, so for me it's not even a question; I'd do whatever it took to stay in the Pacific Northwest, be it Portland, Bend, Seattle, Tacoma, Vancouver, etc. Chicago weather sucks terribly (damn freezing in winter and humid as F in the summer). Whereas in the PNW, the spring, summer, fall are among the best in the United States (moderate temps, no humidity, few biting insects). Pacific Northwest winters are very mild west of the mountains due to the moderating effects of the Pacific Ocean; it very rarely snows west of the mountains. Also, food all around is much better in the PNW (and frankly better than most of the rest of the country). Much prefer the people up here too.

Illinois is a political disaster, and it will be a miracle if Chicago doesn't declare bankruptcy at some point. People are fleeing Chicago's home state, so keep that in mind. Bottom line, there's a reason it costs significantly more to live on the West coast versus the rest of the United States.
Vancouver (vantucky) or Tacoma over Chicago? Doesn't Bend get as cold as Chicago in winter? Those places are too slow, small, and boring for me. Portland and Seattle are the only cities in PNW I would want to live in.

Why do you hate Chicago? If you read my OP, I have lived in Portland and Seattle and I remember two seasons there: short summers from July 5 to September (perfect weather) to damp/cloudy/wet majority of the year with occasional nice sunny days in late spring (mid-April-July 4) and early fall (until mid-October). Looking at the average weather data, Chicago is only colder than Portland/Seattle for three months (Dec/Jan/Feb). And Portland/Seattle are very humid in winter. I agree that food all around is better!

I agree that Illinois is bad financial shape, but I am not going to be working for the government. Fortune 500 companies are relocating from suburbs to the loop (Con Agra, Heinz-Kraft, McDonalds, Motorola). http://www.chicagotribune.com/busine...htmlstory.html
Illinois has 50 fortune 500 companies, Oregon has 2. The reasons why housing is expensive in Portland is due to urban growth boundary, height restrictions, anti development/growth attitude, and influx of California buyers. Its not simply because the local economy is thriving (which i'm glad, because it wasn't when I lived there).

From my experience Chicago's downtown seems cleaner than both Portland and Seattle, where there are panhandlers on every corner.

Last edited by CityPlanning; 02-18-2018 at 03:34 AM..
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Old 02-20-2018, 12:10 AM
 
90 posts, read 195,139 times
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Lived in both Chicago and Portland for years. Yes Chicago has more severe winters but they also have a true Fall/Winter cultural season with world class symphony, opera, theatre, museum shows. Winter time in Portland is rain, rain and more rain. It’s mild—but not that mild. Do you really want to go hiking or riding in drizzle and 48 degrees? Skiing is a great escape (and far superior to anything in the Midwest) but that’s about it. Many Portlanders hit the bars HARD in the wintertime and it has never struck me as a very healthy tendency...
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Old 02-21-2018, 01:47 PM
 
121 posts, read 66,050 times
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I'd pick Chicago for the work and cultural opportunities and frankly just because it's a nicer city.

But I wouldn't kid yourself about the financial mess that Illinois is in, and the government will come for the taxpayers to make up for their mistakes. Look at Connecticut for an example. I also would be ready for the weather. I'm from that part of the country and the winters aren't even in the same world as the PNW and neither are the hot humid summers. I'm not particularly weather-sensitive but my parents couldn't wait to escape.
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Old 02-27-2018, 11:48 AM
 
Location: Portland, OR
9,626 posts, read 10,089,884 times
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Not picking on any one poster but... I have to ask... if y'all's hate Portland so much... why do you continue living here? Portland isn't perfect. Nowhere is. Chicago has a world class symphony but I don't think I'd lose any money betting that none of you have ever been to see the CSO in concert. I lived for decades in NYC which few could argue bests Chicago in every single category that most here consider pluses for a big city. More to the point, in 2018 NYC no longer deals with crime as bad as Chicago or with a rust belt COL and all that goes with that. Why aren't you encouraging the o.p. to consider NYC? But the bigger question is why the question is being asked at all, and why people living on the Portland side of the answer support Chicago more, even though they no longer live there, if they ever did. <confused>
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Old 02-27-2018, 02:26 PM
 
10,711 posts, read 13,501,561 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Leisesturm View Post
Not picking on any one poster but... I have to ask... if y'all's hate Portland so much... why do you continue living here? Portland isn't perfect. Nowhere is. Chicago has a world class symphony but I don't think I'd lose any money betting that none of you have ever been to see the CSO in concert. I lived for decades in NYC which few could argue bests Chicago in every single category that most here consider pluses for a big city. More to the point, in 2018 NYC no longer deals with crime as bad as Chicago or with a rust belt COL and all that goes with that. Why aren't you encouraging the o.p. to consider NYC? But the bigger question is why the question is being asked at all, and why people living on the Portland side of the answer support Chicago more, even though they no longer live there, if they ever did. <confused>
Chicago is very inexpensive compared to NYC. It's COL is actually less than Portland's.
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Old 02-27-2018, 04:27 PM
 
Location: Portland, OR
9,626 posts, read 10,089,884 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vlajos View Post
Chicago is very inexpensive compared to NYC. It's COL is actually less than Portland's.
My point exactly.
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Old 02-27-2018, 06:17 PM
 
Location: Aliante
2,881 posts, read 2,253,672 times
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If you can get into the Chicago market I' d take that.

Plus Portland is over crowded and has a housing crisis. Chicago is bigger.
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Old 02-27-2018, 09:53 PM
 
3,939 posts, read 3,993,300 times
Reputation: 3049
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leisesturm View Post
Not picking on any one poster but... I have to ask... if y'all's hate Portland so much... why do you continue living here? Portland isn't perfect. Nowhere is. Chicago has a world class symphony but I don't think I'd lose any money betting that none of you have ever been to see the CSO in concert. I lived for decades in NYC which few could argue bests Chicago in every single category that most here consider pluses for a big city. More to the point, in 2018 NYC no longer deals with crime as bad as Chicago or with a rust belt COL and all that goes with that. Why aren't you encouraging the o.p. to consider NYC? But the bigger question is why the question is being asked at all, and why people living on the Portland side of the answer support Chicago more, even though they no longer live there, if they ever did. <confused>
I support Chicago because of the OP’s age but I am biased because I left my hometown of SF in my 20’s to move to a big city- NYC, and am glad that I did. Younger people now may want a slower pace than my friends and I from my generation so there is a generation gap but for me being young was finding a bigger world.
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Old 02-28-2018, 03:49 AM
 
Location: Aliante
2,881 posts, read 2,253,672 times
Reputation: 2431
Had an after thought.

Unless you're really a Fortune 500 company bringing 50 thousand jobs, innovation and development, and the salaries for people to afford and fill up our luxury condo glut. Then we have the room and will make more room and cater to your lifestyles.

At least from what I've read and seen. Right now there's a real contentious battle going on between old Portland and new Portland. The city has filled up in the last five years according to residents. Oregon has been the hot ticket running ten years now in the top ten places people move. Portland one of the most populated. An influx that surpasses it's capacity to currently withhold and sustain. They're trying to keep up with it, but it's not without evidence of growing pains in the media here and backlash. Mainly it seems because it's two different cultures and one is enchroaching on the other.

The thing that gets me is watching a business that styles itself catering to new Portland while simultaneously lashing out at new Portland to cater to old Portland, so it fails. Same goes with the writing I've read. Some business model.

I wouldn't advise moving here right now unless you need to.

Last edited by Merry Lee Gather; 02-28-2018 at 03:58 AM..
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