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Old 07-31-2012, 04:10 PM
 
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my relative who as apergers is insufferable to be around , his dad is dead and when his mother eventually passes on , the guy will be all alone in this world for the rest of his life , no one can bare to be around him , he will probabley end up homeless as he is incapable of making himself lunch let alone manage his life and have a career , unfortunatley in my country , the mental health service is completley and utterly dominated by liberals , theese hypocrite would perfer see seriously unwell people live under a cardboard box then face the reality that some people cannot manage in the real world and place them in an institution , a nice chat with a progressive liberal social worker or shrink once a week simply doesnt cut it
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Old 08-01-2012, 01:31 AM
 
Location: central Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BECLAZONE View Post
All too often it is assumed that Aspies have no emotions, and little understanding of many things.
To this end, many think it acceptable to be offensive and insulting towards Aspies.
Offensive and insulting, is not just a verbal thing!
Agree.

I did not know my son had Asperger's until he was 27. Sadly, my younger brothers thought it was funny to tease my son (when he was a teen) because it was obvious he was not 'normal'. He also had to deal with insults about his hygiene issues from the same uncles.
We moved away from AZ to get away from them. They just never understood that what they were doing was wrong.
They haven't seen us since my son was diagnosed, so they have no idea what Asperger's is. We live with my older brother and it has been a long road getting him to understand Asperger's. However, the longer he sees it with his own eyes, the more he understands that this is real and not something I made up. (He did accuse me of babying my son, but has since seen differently.)
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Old 08-01-2012, 10:57 AM
 
Location: Elsewhere
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Originally Posted by Doll Eyes View Post
I beleive aspies to be 'emotionally detached from most people,' not that I want to see people get hit by a bus or anything, I am more attached to animals. They are better company and don't act like people do. now some of the asperger people are attached to one or two people like a parent or a sibling but then not others in the family.
Well, I don't have Asperger's and I can pretty much agree with you on that.
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Old 08-01-2012, 11:02 AM
 
Location: Elsewhere
82,332 posts, read 75,690,167 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BECLAZONE View Post
All too often it is assumed that Aspies have no emotions, and little understanding of many things.
To this end, many think it acceptable to be offensive and insulting towards Aspies.
Offensive and insulting, is not just a verbal thing!
That is why I asked the question. I didn't want to assume. I don't know that I know anyone with Asperger's--I probably DO, but don't know that they have it.

My late father seems to have had symptoms of Asperger's, but it's hard to tell because he also was severely disabled in WWII and had what I know now was PTSD and now that I know what PTSD is myself, some of the detachment could have been that.

However, given that my brother seems to have Asperger's (again, not diagnosed, wasn't known or at least well known when he was a kid) perhaps there was something genetic there.
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Old 08-01-2012, 05:19 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
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Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
Well, I don't have Asperger's and I can pretty much agree with you on that.

MQ well then maybe you do have AS if you prefer animals to people! Never know!
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Old 08-04-2012, 08:26 AM
 
Location: Southwest Desert
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When I'm with people I give them my full attention and enjoy making eye contact. But this doesn't seem to be the norm in society today. A lot of people have "wandering eyes" or look elsewhere when they talk...I don't assume that everyone who does this has Asperger's Syndrome because it seems pretty common..Once in awhile I run into people who maintain eye contact throughout the entire conversation. It's nice! But a bit rare these days.
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Old 08-06-2012, 11:23 AM
 
Location: Elsewhere
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Originally Posted by Doll Eyes View Post
MQ well then maybe you do have AS if you prefer animals to people! Never know!
Hahaha, well, in my case, I think it's learned behavior!
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Old 08-07-2012, 10:25 PM
 
10,452 posts, read 12,025,548 times
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Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
Question: Can these types of people be taught/learn such things as paying attention to non-verbal communication, conversation skills, etc?

It seems to me that they would be able to since they have the intelligence. If so, I'm sure it would require great effort.

And another question--does this also mean that they do not have feelings for others, either?
I have learned how to be more social through a set of algorithms I've devised in my head. Socializing is not natural to me but I've internalized my algorithms for long enough that it's become almost second-nature.

Personally I have feelings for other people and empathize strongly with other people. I think a lot more Asperger's people are perceived as having no empathy than is actually the case, because some Aspies simply show it differently, or don't know how to show it at all, and get lumped in with the Aspies who don't feel empathy.
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Old 08-07-2012, 10:28 PM
 
10,452 posts, read 12,025,548 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
That is why I asked the question. I didn't want to assume. I don't know that I know anyone with Asperger's--I probably DO, but don't know that they have it.

My late father seems to have had symptoms of Asperger's, but it's hard to tell because he also was severely disabled in WWII and had what I know now was PTSD and now that I know what PTSD is myself, some of the detachment could have been that.

However, given that my brother seems to have Asperger's (again, not diagnosed, wasn't known or at least well known when he was a kid) perhaps there was something genetic there.
As someone with Asperger's and PTSD, I personally experience some overlap in symptoms, such as being anxious in social situations and being very sensitive to my surroundings. I can also see how something with two separate root causes might look the same to someone on the outside--such as an Aspie having a meltdown over a certain sound in the environment and someone with PTSD being triggered by a certain sound in the environment.
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Old 08-10-2012, 10:55 AM
 
Location: Elsewhere
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Originally Posted by nimchimpsky View Post
As someone with Asperger's and PTSD, I personally experience some overlap in symptoms, such as being anxious in social situations and being very sensitive to my surroundings. I can also see how something with two separate root causes might look the same to someone on the outside--such as an Aspie having a meltdown over a certain sound in the environment and someone with PTSD being triggered by a certain sound in the environment.
Interesting. However, although I have some PTSD and don't have Asperger's, I'm wondering what distinguishes someone with Asperger's who is anxious in social situations and sensitive to surroundings from someone who is not but has the same characteristics. I have always been anxious in social situations (and worked very hard to overcome most of it) and sensitive to surroundings (colors, noise, etc.) and yet it's not Asperger's, obviously.

Since 9/11, I have more triggers, of course, such as reaction to loud sounds, floors that "move", and oddball stuff, such as smelling the WTC when I watch it on TV.
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