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Old 07-26-2012, 11:56 AM
 
Location: Old Town Alexandria
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What is anyones experience when having a discussion with someone with Aspergers? Is it a reciprocal conversation?, or one-sided?. Are people with the syndrome aware of this?

Are the cues easier to spot in person, how does it manifest if untreated?


Asperger's syndrome symptoms include:
  • Engaging in one-sided, long-winded conversations, without noticing if the listener is listening or trying to change the subject
  • Displaying unusual nonverbal communication, such as lack of eye contact, few facial expressions, or awkward body postures and gestures
  • Showing an intense obsession with one or two specific, narrow subjects, such as baseball statistics, train schedules, weather or snakes
  • Appearing not to understand, empathize with or be sensitive to others' feelings
  • Having a hard time "reading" other people or understanding humor
  • Speaking in a voice that is monotonous, rigid or unusually fast
  • Moving clumsily, with poor coordination




Asperger's syndrome: Symptoms - MayoClinic.com
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Old 07-26-2012, 01:04 PM
 
Location: Old Town Alexandria
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Classified as one of many pervasive development disorders Asperger Syndrome is also seen in many adults. The brain of individuals with Adult Asperger Syndrome works in a different way, especially when it comes down to processing information. Their focus is on details and mostly these adults have specialized in one field of interest. Asperger symptoms in adults can stabalize over time and this provides them with opportunities to improve their social skills and behavior.

it is an interesting discussion. Those diagnosed can be highly intelligent, but cannot see things from anyone else's point of view.

It seems many undiagnosed can lead to confusion, i.e. in the way they are perceived at work, or in public, or by their affect.
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Old 07-26-2012, 03:10 PM
 
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Something I have learned from dealing with individuals with Asperger, they do not understand non verbal communication at all. When you tell them you are speaking to them non verbally, they do not know how to react. Verbally confronting them simply aids their ego, they are helpless from a non verbal assault.
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Old 07-26-2012, 03:18 PM
 
Location: 39 20' 59"N / 75 30' 53"W
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From my own experience.....They miss the nuances and innuendo, verbal or non verbal converstion and body language.

Their beliefs are engraved in stone, don't attempt to change their mind.
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Old 07-26-2012, 03:36 PM
 
Location: Old Town Alexandria
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Thanks for the feedback.

So they also think myopically/black and white?
Is this similar to Borderline?

Seems non-verbal requires, more social skills and is nuanced, so they are apt to not see things that others would pick up on?
What about humor/irony, would they have issues with that.
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Old 07-28-2012, 09:54 AM
 
Location: Elsewhere
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Question: Can these types of people be taught/learn such things as paying attention to non-verbal communication, conversation skills, etc?

It seems to me that they would be able to since they have the intelligence. If so, I'm sure it would require great effort.

And another question--does this also mean that they do not have feelings for others, either?
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Old 07-28-2012, 11:20 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
Question: Can these types of people be taught/learn such things as paying attention to non-verbal communication, conversation skills, etc?

It seems to me that they would be able to since they have the intelligence. If so, I'm sure it would require great effort.

And another question--does this also mean that they do not have feelings for others, either?
I think they can be taught, but it is a process and actually mastering non-verbal communication and conversation skills would likely always be a struggle for these people.

They do have feelings for others. Their impairment is in socializing with others and in 'reading people.'
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Old 07-28-2012, 12:47 PM
 
Location: Old Town Alexandria
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Good responses everyone, thank you.

"reading people" , that's a good way to put it. Not necessarily empathy, but basic understanding of where someone else's perspective is coming from. Not sure if there is a clinical term for that. Some drs. use the term "visceral" /sensory understanding
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Old 07-28-2012, 01:00 PM
 
Location: Southwest Desert
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My friend's 14 year old son has Asperger's Syndrome. (He's high-functioning and attends regular classes in school.)...When I go over to visit my friend this son usually gives me the most attention. He enjoys talking and interacting with adults...He doesn't seem to talk about the past very often. Most of the time his focus is on the present and what he's currently doing... Or he may talk about something he plans to do or "build" in the near future. Once in awhile he might talk about a recent school outing or something like that...My friend has 3 sons and this son is the oldest. The other boys are reaching the age where they want to "fit-in" with their peers. Image is becoming "all and everything" to them. And it affects their behavior at times...The older son is a more of a "free spirit." He feels entitled to pursue his interests without stressing over "fitting-in" with the other guys all the time...He's very attentive! He's the one who keeps my coffee cup filled when I come over. And a lot of times he offers me something to eat. (His parents aren't always attentive to guests so he must have decided to be this way on his own.)...Awhile back ago he had his first girlfriend and showered her with attention. He kept me "posted" about his relationship when I came over to visit..He has feelings. The last time I saw him he asked me if I felt "afraid" and "scared" about my son's condition. (My son has been dealing with brain tumors.) He said he sure hopes my son gets "well" and can come home soon! (Because he misses him too!)
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Old 07-28-2012, 04:25 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
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I don't beleive you can be taught to change the type of person that you are and your ingrained traits, maybe if the person was like 5 or 10 -- but an adult no. some of the things OP mentioned I suffer from:

  • Displaying unusual nonverbal communication, such as lack of eye contact, few facial expressions, or awkward body postures and gestures
  • Showing an intense obsession with one or two specific, narrow subjects, such as baseball statistics, train schedules, weather or snakes
  • Appearing not to understand, empathize with or be sensitive to others' feelings
  • Having a hard time "reading" other people or understanding humor
  • Speaking in a voice that is monotonous, rigid or unusually fast
  • Moving clumsily, with poor coordination
I can't imagine any kind of doctor is going to have success removing those traits from me at age 32. It is what it is. People would be better off learning how to stop squeezing everyone into their predetermined 'social box.'
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