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Old 12-17-2013, 06:12 PM
 
Location: USA
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The article below says that introversion has nothing to do with shyness --- instead, it's all about how you derive your energy. Introverts get energy through solitude and reflection, according the article, and extroverts from social interaction.

Introverts vs.. Extroverts: Learn About Both Personality Types and Which One You Fall Under

But I feel the article does not hit on other key differences between both groups.

I've heard that introverts tend to be more creative, empathetic and studious/intellectual. Is there truth to this?
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Old 12-18-2013, 01:32 AM
 
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I agree.

I consider myself an introvert....I like social interaction, but in small doses, very softly and when there an easy escape in case I feel "okay, I had enough".

Reading a book, watching tv, going for a solitary run/walk, etc, those are the things I like.

Of course this type of attitude has its downside: romantic relationships tend to be messy.
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Old 12-18-2013, 11:20 AM
 
Location: Santa FE NM
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Though I hate to say it in this way, "It depends..."

It depends on which definitions and behavioral characteristics one considers. One commonly-used pair of extrovert-introvert definitions, derived from the work of Carl Jung and incorporated in the widely-used Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), does indeed focus on how one "recharges his batteries," so to speak. By these definitions an extrovert turns to people and social interaction to recharge, and finds solitude to be draining. An introvert, on the other hand, turns to solitude to recharge but is drained by social interactions.

Now, though I am definitely an introvert by these definitions, you'd never know it on first (or even fourth) meeting. In fact, many think I'm an extrovert and are flabbergasted to learn otherwise.
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Old 12-18-2013, 11:26 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Javier77 View Post
I agree.

I consider myself an introvert....I like social interaction, but in small doses, very softly and when there an easy escape in case I feel "okay, I had enough".

Reading a book, watching tv, going for a solitary run/walk, etc, those are the things I like.

Of course this type of attitude has its downside: romantic relationships tend to be messy.
And a lot of work/business culture is predicated on workers being outgoing and talkative. I dread going to conferences because of the mingling and networking, but I do it because it's important for my work life. It's not that I'm unable or afraid to talk to people, but it's just so draining. And then I go back to my hotel room and sit quietly for a few hours.
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Old 12-18-2013, 11:18 PM
 
Location: SNA=>PDX 2013
2,793 posts, read 4,071,771 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wordsmith12 View Post
The article below says that introversion has nothing to do with shyness --- instead, it's all about how you derive your energy. Introverts get energy through solitude and reflection, according the article, and extroverts from social interaction.
This is perfect. I wish more people, especially extroverts, would understand this.

Quote:
But I feel the article does not hit on other key differences between both groups.

I've heard that introverts tend to be more creative, empathetic and studious/intellectual. Is there truth to this?
The problem with any generalization is that introvert/extrovert isn't black and white. It's on a scale with lots and lots of gray. So, I'm sure there are tons of creative people that are extroverts. Intellectual? Please, that defines everyone at my HS. The "popular" kids were (mostly) very extroverted and smart. They enjoyed studying together. As an introvert, I hated that. They loved group projects. You know I hated it, LOL.

Empathy wise, no clue. For me, I know more females, versus men, who can empathize, extroverts or not. That's just from the people I know. I tend to know more extroverts.

From the article:
Quote:
Thankfully for introverts, the world has become increasingly digital.
This is so true. I love the internet.


Lots of people don't take me as an introvert either. Usually because I fake it very well. Then go home and crash hard. LOL. My friend and co-worker who's known me for over 10 years had no clue how introverted I was. My new job wanted an "extrovert". I said I'm their woman. I have introduced myself to so many people, went to a party on my second day, interacted with people I don't know, put a happy face on, talk with everyone, and well, I go home and don't even turn on the tv or anything. Pure quiet is what I need to recover. But, it's work. I just know I have to get out of my comfort zone (as I am also shy).
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Old 12-18-2013, 11:46 PM
 
30,896 posts, read 36,970,454 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wordsmith12 View Post
The article below says that introversion has nothing to do with shyness --- instead, it's all about how you derive your energy. Introverts get energy through solitude and reflection, according the article, and extroverts from social interaction.

Introverts vs.. Extroverts: Learn About Both Personality Types and Which One You Fall Under

But I feel the article does not hit on other key differences between both groups.

I've heard that introverts tend to be more creative, empathetic and studious/intellectual. Is there truth to this?
I think you have to get into the more specific Myers-Briggs personality types, of which there are 16.
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Old 12-18-2013, 11:50 PM
 
30,896 posts, read 36,970,454 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by psichick View Post
This is perfect. I wish more people, especially extroverts, would understand this..
They don't. Since extroverts dominate the workplace, they set things up according to their preferences. I'm not saying they do this deliberately, but it just happens.

I think this is one reason why introverts are more likely to retire early (aside from the fact that they tend to be better savers & investors). They tire of all the networking & political nonsense, which they don't like and see as useless fluff.
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Old 12-19-2013, 09:31 AM
 
Location: Santa FE NM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mysticaltyger View Post
Since extroverts dominate the workplace...
We introverts just let them think so. [Teasing, I'm teasing...]

Actually, if we're using the Carl Jung/Myers-Briggs definitions, this isn't correct. "Introvert" does not equal "Inhibited", nor does it equal "Reclusive." I have known a number of senior executives, including a handful of CEOs, who test as introverts on the Myers-Briggs.

To illustrate, here's a list of well-known Myers-Briggs introverts who dominate(d) their respective "workplaces": Arnold Schwartzenegger, John Kerry, Alan Greenspan, Gandhi, Thomas Jefferson, Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, Erwin Rommel, Donald Rumsfeld, Vladimir Putin, Calvin Coolidge, Ron Paul, Adolf Hitler, Osama bin Laden, the Ayatollah Khomeini, Clint Eastwood, George Washington, Dwight D. Eisenhower, Warren Buffett, Richard Nixon, Jimmy Carter, Angela Merkel, David Petraeus, George H.W. Bush, Mitt Romney, Robert E. Lee, George Armstrong Custer, Ulysses S. Grant, Mother Teresa, Francisco Franco, and Kim Kardashian(!!).

Last edited by Nighteyes; 12-19-2013 at 11:00 AM..
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Old 12-19-2013, 02:12 PM
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,539 posts, read 21,265,870 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mysticaltyger View Post
They don't. Since extroverts dominate the workplace, they set things up according to their preferences. I'm not saying they do this deliberately, but it just happens.

I think this is one reason why introverts are more likely to retire early (aside from the fact that they tend to be better savers & investors). They tire of all the networking & political nonsense, which they don't like and see as useless fluff.
After I finished my major in computer programming (something which appeals to us introverts) I got a job in the real world. I was lucky, and as a trainee I was trusted the new development of a small system. I loved my job. The people I worked with were hardly your standard issue types. I enjoyed my job. We socialized but in an off beat way, and everyone had a birthday lunch.

Then the bank was sold to a bunch of suits. We were never seen by customers, never talked to them, never had to confirm to 'bank image' before. But our desks were messy. We had too many printouts on the desk, and too much personal stuff. One man who wore golf shirts and had a tweety bird tie in his desk if they insisted was supposed to wear a suit. He didn't but they needed him to much to fire him.

It wasn't fun anymore. We had to be all happy about bank successes, with a rah rah bit (everyone hated it) and we were supposed to produce those fixes and things on time. With thirty year old programs which took a chart to find where it did anything. People started leaving for lunch. People started quitting. Then they had the bright idea to use contractors since it was cheaper. Several of the upper people they either pushed out or let go got hired back as contractors since they were the only person who knew how they worked.

When I was laid off, after my system went live, I was devistated, but just the same all the games had become very old. The contractors were often as odd as us, but came and went and didn't socialize. I got to where I hated going to work. In the end I started to feel a great deal of relief in leaving. I realized it had completely taken over my life. I swore I'd never do that again.

I think as someone who likes aloneness, I was destined to decide it wasn't for me. But the whole be part of the crowd, and all the 'teams' and all the stupid rules would have made me go. My other experience in that kind of job, later, convinced me that it wasn't made for me at all.

I loved the actual work, but all the crap that went with it wasn't me at all.

I am very high on the I part of myers briggs, a couple of tries a hundred percent so maybe I'm more extreme than some, but I think the business world is missing out on those of us who are good at something which could be done in a quiet room without being bothered, but if you can't be a good little robot then you don't fit in.

Health made it impossible for me to have a carrear, and I have come to learn to enjoy the moment, not be depressed over potential what ifs which were lost. But if I had made one, I'm sure I would have jumped at the chance to get off the merry go round as soon as possible and might just have taken a leap of faith and jumped anyway.

It's sure too bad we in our superficial culture don't value skills as much as PR.
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Old 12-19-2013, 03:38 PM
 
Location: Canada
196 posts, read 424,580 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nighteyes View Post
Though I hate to say it in this way, "It depends..."
Now, though I am definitely an introvert by these definitions, you'd never know it on first (or even fourth) meeting. In fact, many think I'm an extrovert and are flabbergasted to learn otherwise.
This is funny as it describes me in a way too. However, there are ambiverts as well - it is very rare the person who is pure extrovert or introvert.

Although one might think that I am an extrovert, I do feel like I am an ambivert. Sometimes being with others is energizing and invigorating. Sometimes, being with others is draining and tiring. And my MBTI does start with an "E". Sometimes I need quiet time by myself to recharge and focus, while other times, being by myself makes me lazy and unmotivated.

Like most things psychological, there are very few who are black and white, and most of us live somewhere in the grey. And nothing is wrong with being either one, or somewhere in the middle. Though I do feel bad for the introvert who is set upon by the extrovert who is determined to "draw them out of their shell". If some creatures are "drawn out of their shell", they die.
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