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Old 07-30-2015, 01:53 PM
 
Location: Middle America
37,409 posts, read 53,559,149 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lilac110 View Post
Because they aren't being paid to do more than that.

Let's be honest here: Employees going above and beyond in corporate America are rarely rewarded these days. If anything, they become the victim of "if you want something done, give it to a busy person," and efficiency is often punished by giving someone extra work.

If you want more out of your employees, then add more to their job descriptions. But complaining about them simply meeting the requirements of their jobs is silly.
Right. But loads of jobs aren't in corporate America, and have very different environments. I also haven't ever worked directly in a corporate setting (worked for a newspaper for a stretch that was had been sold at some point to a parent corp, but they were very remote, hands-off owners, and the setting was not remotely corporate in nature), but it seems to me to be unlikely that ALL corporate settings are soul-sucking and ultimately unrewarding toward those who put forth extra effort. I believe that not ALL people who go above and beyond are reinforced for doing so, but surely some are, or turnover would be 100%.
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Old 07-30-2015, 02:45 PM
 
Location: I'm around here someplace :)
3,633 posts, read 5,354,854 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Greater_Ninja View Post
Why do people do the bare minimum at work?
Some people are just plain lazy, perhaps there are others who can't really grasp the job they're supposed to be doing, and you may also find individuals who aren't living up to the potential they normally would simply because they never feel appreciated even when they do put in extra effort.
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Old 07-30-2015, 02:47 PM
 
23,177 posts, read 12,210,827 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
It is not every workplace where you are rewarded for going the extra mile. For those in such workplaces, they see that going above and beyond for their employer has no tangible benefit for them (no additional pay, no chance of promotion, no recognition, no appreciation, doesn't necessarily protect you from layoffs/the chopping block, whatever), and it becomes nonsensical to put in the additional effort, rather than just keep one's nose down and do what's expected and no more. It doesn't necessarily mean that the job isn't important to them. It may simply mean that it's a workplace culture that will not reward extra work or dedication in any meaningful way. And there are a lot of workplaces that are like that.
Sometimes it's even worse than that. Future expectations are often based on past performance so if you do more then you become expected to do more. Your reward is more work.
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Old 07-30-2015, 02:48 PM
 
Location: Texas
44,254 posts, read 64,347,350 times
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As long as you do everything in the job description, I may not want you as a life partner or even a friend, but I can't fault you as a worker.
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Old 07-30-2015, 03:13 PM
 
804 posts, read 1,075,268 times
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I used to go over and beyond at work for years. what did it get me? nothing but more work for the same pay. Now I do anything to stay under the radar.
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Old 07-30-2015, 03:36 PM
 
Location: Huntersville/Charlotte, NC and Washington, DC
26,699 posts, read 41,730,129 times
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I proudly admit I do the bare minimum at work. My company actively awards mediocre employees who drink the kool-aid of their BS mission and are "likable". Workers who are actually competent at their jobs or actually bust their a$& but aren't the most social never get looked at for promotions or other rewards. There is no way I'm going to invest any more energy than I have to to a company like mine. Plus the American employer has made it quite clear we are expendable parts who they actively try to pay the bare minimum to. I will not work myself to death trying to make the American employer happy.
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Old 07-30-2015, 04:18 PM
 
335 posts, read 329,615 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
Well, I don't necessarily agree, either, that intersecting career identities and personal identities has to equal job obsession. I also think it's okay to love your work and think it's great when people are fortunate enough to have work that embodies their passion.

Some people are very motivated by their careers, and find a great deal of personal fulfillment in them. They may take the work they do very seriously, and their professional roles may factor heavily into their sense of self. This is often found in people who pursue heavily human services-related vocations, the sorts of people who ae more likely to identify the work they do as a "calling" than a "job." People who are firefighters, clergy, EMTs, social workers, crisis counselors, military, public health workers, etc. often have quite a bit of their personal ideals and identities invested in the type of work they do. People who are actually able to make a living in the arts are also similar.

It's not wrong or right to follow your passions into a job, just as it's not wrong or right to take a job that is strictly a means to an end, but isn't deeply personally meaningful. It depends entirely on what you want.
I don't disagree with anything you have written here. And none of it contradicts what I wrote earlier. Certainly many people do love their work. I have no criticism of that fortunate circumstance. What I was pointing out is that many, if not in fact most, people do not find their work to be their raison d'être. There's simply nothing uncommon or amoral about merely working to survive.
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Old 07-30-2015, 04:52 PM
 
Location: Middle America
37,409 posts, read 53,559,149 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tia 914 View Post
Some people are just plain lazy, perhaps there are others who can't really grasp the job they're supposed to be doing, and you may also find individuals who aren't living up to the potential they normally would simply because they never feel appreciated even when they do put in extra effort.
Again, doing the job description as stated, nothing more, nothing less (i.e. the bare minimum) is technically neither lazy nor an indication of failure to grasp the job description. It's simply a choice not to go above and beyond what is required. It's also a perfectly valid choice, depending on the individual's goals and priorities.

Is it likely to get you noticed (in a positive way), to help you stand out in terms of potential for raises, promotions, recognition, etc.? Nope. But not everyone is looking for that, they're looking to show up, do the job they were hired to do, get paid, go home. And that's fine for some/many people. And there are many people who work for organizations and businesses and clients who put in the extra time, effort, go above and beyond routinely, etc. and DON'T get squat for their efforts, as well.

I don't think it's lazy or unmotivated to just do your job, nothing more, nothing less. I do think it's lazy and unmotivated (not to mention, potentially quite destructive to your ability keep your job) to do LESS than your job requires.

Quote:
Originally Posted by oceangaia
Sometimes it's even worse than that. Future expectations are often based on past performance so if you do more then you become expected to do more. Your reward is more work.
Definitely. Setting the bar high for yourself can completely compromise your ability to scale back as needed, because the expectation has been set. I found this in my first job out of college, being the young, fresh newbie cub and eager to prove myself. The expectation quickly became that I would do the lion's share, and when I didn't/couldn't, it then became an issue, even though all those extras weren't actually in my job description. I did get raises, recognition, and can't complain about that, but ultimately, none of that was worth the workload that got piled on. The raises and awards really didn't do anything to offset the severe hits to quality of life that came of doing about 3-4 people's worth of work. Even though I love the work, it burned me out.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AmorphicDN
I don't disagree with anything you have written here. And none of it contradicts what I wrote earlier. Certainly many people do love their work. I have no criticism of that fortunate circumstance. What I was pointing out is that many, if not in fact most, people do not find their work to be their raison d'être. There's simply nothing uncommon or amoral about merely working to survive.
Cool. It just seemed possible that your description of those who routinely do more than is in their job description as being "obsessed with work," as well as work being "overrated as a pursuit" seemed dismissive of and pejorative toward those who truly love what they do and find it satisfying, and don't find a high degree of devotion to it to be a hardship or a negative thing.
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Old 07-30-2015, 05:00 PM
 
Location: Texas
44,254 posts, read 64,347,350 times
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You don't have to love and enjoy.

You can just be the kind of person who gives 110% to everything. Who cannot stand not doing the best they are capable of. At work or anywhere else.
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Old 07-30-2015, 05:10 PM
 
3,463 posts, read 5,658,967 times
Reputation: 7218
Work in a non-profit for a while. You will rethink everything you ever learned about work. Really, too much to go into here, but doing the bare minimum is a survival tactic. You will actually harm yourself personally and professionally by going above and beyond. It is hard to get used to, but eventually you will if you just want to get through the day uneventfully.
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