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Old 11-02-2023, 10:14 AM
 
Location: 'greater' Buffalo, NY
5,469 posts, read 3,913,523 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sonic_Spork View Post
I agree.

I also think that most people, if they spend any significant amount of time around others, will start to mirror whatever kind of speech they are hearing. Some do this more readily than others, and I would be really interested in knowing more about why that is. I know that a week long vacation in another part of the country, visiting people who have any kind of an accent or speech pattern, will be enough for me to start unconsciously mirroring it. And I once came away from a solid weekend of Monty Python marathon, speaking not just with some accent going on but with the particular pauses and rhythms common to a lot of their sketch comedy.

And in addition to all of the stuff with accents and patterns like that... I pick up what I refer to as "isms" from other people. Particular words, phrases, or even gestures or ways of saying something. I have gone back and watched some show or movie or something I had not seen in many years, only to recognize a thing that I say or do pretty commonly in my speech comes directly from a particular line delivered by some actor, and I'd long forgotten where it came from!

And I have been guilty of doing the Lewis Black "angry fingers and clenched teeth" thing when expressing certain thoughts where I intend a kind of humorous hyperbole. Silly-mad.

I think it's very interesting how we get all the bits and pieces that form our communication.

And maybe when it comes to something like upspeak...a lot of folks find it annoying and might avoid people who do it, and perhaps to some extent, if a person picks it up by mirroring and then does it without thinking it signals association with a social group?

But I actually JUST realized that the Australian comedian Hannah Gadsby does it a lot and I like one of her stand up specials and LOVE another one (Douglas was soooo funny)... It doesn't bug me when she does it.
Back in college, my friend group included a person who seemed (and in fact was) particularly impressionable when it came to expressions or cliches used by others. Often, before a poker game or miscellaneous get-together, the rest of us would agree upon a phrase for the night, with our goal being to get the impressionable guy to use the phrase at least once by the end of the night. It almost always worked. My all-time favorite was when the chosen phrase was 'looking out for number one.' I find that phrase somewhat humorous to begin with, so there's that underlying amusement-component from the start. But even better was the way the 'mark' really latched onto that phrase. It became a callback on future nights, and has to be considered our most successful instance of linguistic brainwashing that we ever attempted.

Full disclosure: I remain friends with the 'mark' to this day, 15-20 years later, and I don't believe he's ever been informed of the 'Get Person X to use Phrase Y by the end of the night' game that he was often subjected to. If someone told him, it certainly wasn't me
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Old 11-02-2023, 10:23 AM
 
Location: 'greater' Buffalo, NY
5,469 posts, read 3,913,523 times
Reputation: 7459
Quote:
Originally Posted by bu2 View Post
I know when my wife goes home to South Georgia, her South Georgia accent gets a lot thicker. When I was in junior high I had a science class with 5 Hispanics at my table. At the end of the class I would catch myself sounding like them with my own Spanish accent! I lived so many places when I was younger my normal accent has become kind of muted.
Yeah, I have a friend whose dad is from Poland, and when I'd go golfing with the two of them, he'd alternate between sounding like a bland Buffalonian and a first-generation Polish immigrant, depending on which of the two of us he was talking to. The flip-flopping struck me as being completely unconscious
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Old 11-02-2023, 10:27 AM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
20,369 posts, read 14,644,040 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt Marcinkiewicz View Post
Back in college, my friend group included a person who seemed (and in fact was) particularly impressionable when it came to expressions or cliches used by others. Often, before a poker game or miscellaneous get-together, the rest of us would agree upon a phrase for the night, with our goal being to get the impressionable guy to use the phrase at least once by the end of the night. It almost always worked. My all-time favorite was when the chosen phrase was 'looking out for number one.' I find that phrase somewhat humorous to begin with, so there's that underlying amusement-component from the start. But even better was the way the 'mark' really latched onto that phrase. It became a callback on future nights, and has to be considered our most successful instance of linguistic brainwashing that we ever attempted.

Full disclosure: I remain friends with the 'mark' to this day, 15-20 years later, and I don't believe he's ever been informed of the 'Get Person X to use Phrase Y by the end of the night' game that he was often subjected to. If someone told him, it certainly wasn't me
Oh that is hilarious.

I can't really say if it would be funnier to eventually tell him, or not to.

There are also some words that my ex husband habitually used that I try soooo hard to make sure do not creep into my speech because they always irritated me.

Irregardless<-- And he says the word, "interesting" without pronouncing the 't'... "INNER-esting." Where I grew up saying it, "INT-risting." I don't care which is more or less correct, hearing it said his way annoyed me for some reason. My sons say that the phrase, "it is what it is" makes them want to go on violent rampages because their father said it so much.

What gets to me is when I come up with a quirkier little expression and I believe it to be my own invention, and then later I find it somewhere else...and I am left wondering - Did I pick it up someplace without realizing it? Do I and others just have similar enough thought patterns that we independently came up with the phrase with no particular connection? Did they somehow get the phrase either directly from me or from someone who did? Have I ever had an original thought??? WHO, EVEN, AM I? lol no not really, but it's just weird.
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Old 11-02-2023, 10:41 AM
 
14,301 posts, read 11,684,342 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by heavymind View Post
I didn't hear it, but plenty of vocal creak.
She uses rising intonation at the end of phrases within a sentence, but falling intonation at the very end of the sentence. It's definitely noticeable, but not as bad as actually ENDING a sentence (that is not a question) with a rising tone.
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Old 11-02-2023, 10:44 AM
 
Location: 'greater' Buffalo, NY
5,469 posts, read 3,913,523 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sonic_Spork View Post
Oh that is hilarious.

I can't really say if it would be funnier to eventually tell him, or not to.

There are also some words that my ex husband habitually used that I try soooo hard to make sure do not creep into my speech because they always irritated me.

Irregardless<-- And he says the word, "interesting" without pronouncing the 't'... "INNER-esting." Where I grew up saying it, "INT-risting." I don't care which is more or less correct, hearing it said his way annoyed me for some reason. My sons say that the phrase, "it is what it is" makes them want to go on violent rampages because their father said it so much.

What gets to me is when I come up with a quirkier little expression and I believe it to be my own invention, and then later I find it somewhere else...and I am left wondering - Did I pick it up someplace without realizing it? Do I and others just have similar enough thought patterns that we independently came up with the phrase with no particular connection? Did they somehow get the phrase either directly from me or from someone who did? Have I ever had an original thought??? WHO, EVEN, AM I? lol no not really, but it's just weird.
I'm almost positive that 'it is what it is' is another of the phrases that we used on our mark/friend. If it wasn't, it was certainly something that he said regularly enough on his own...I wish we'd kept a journal, lol.

Re: the last paragraph, I always find it a bit eerie when I find myself uttering the exact same words as another at exactly the same time. Though it can be useful for establishing a connection, too. I remember after a co-ed pickup soccer game once, a bunch of us were standing around and talking, including a girl whom I had some interest in. We were talking about city neighborhoods or something, pros and cons, and I remember that she and I commented 'bike-friendly' about a particular area at the same time. Perceived chemistry instantly skyrocketed, on my end anyway, lol. Unfortunately for me, she was going out with one of the other guys there, and both of them moved to New York City not long after that game
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Old 11-02-2023, 10:44 AM
 
Location: Elsewhere
88,532 posts, read 84,719,546 times
Reputation: 115026
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sonic_Spork View Post
Oh that is hilarious.

I can't really say if it would be funnier to eventually tell him, or not to.

There are also some words that my ex husband habitually used that I try soooo hard to make sure do not creep into my speech because they always irritated me.

Irregardless<-- And he says the word, "interesting" without pronouncing the 't'... "INNER-esting." Where I grew up saying it, "INT-risting." I don't care which is more or less correct, hearing it said his way annoyed me for some reason. My sons say that the phrase, "it is what it is" makes them want to go on violent rampages because their father said it so much.

What gets to me is when I come up with a quirkier little expression and I believe it to be my own invention, and then later I find it somewhere else...and I am left wondering - Did I pick it up someplace without realizing it? Do I and others just have similar enough thought patterns that we independently came up with the phrase with no particular connection? Did they somehow get the phrase either directly from me or from someone who did? Have I ever had an original thought??? WHO, EVEN, AM I? lol no not really, but it's just weird.
I know. I invented the term "foodie" a long time ago, or so I thought, then all of a sudden everyone was using it. Then I didn't want to anymore.
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Old 11-02-2023, 11:05 AM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
20,369 posts, read 14,644,040 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
I know. I invented the term "foodie" a long time ago, or so I thought, then all of a sudden everyone was using it. Then I didn't want to anymore.
It is to the point where I want to be careful how and where I use my wittier little words and phrases that I still believe to be "mine" lest they get released into the wild and some other person decides to claim attribution for them. Just imagine me over here clutching my precious little lingo-bits to my chest possessively while giving other people the suspicious side eye...

Anyways.

Does anyone else have a problem with certain words? There are some perfectly legit words I cannot stand and avoid using just because I find them phonetically irritating. I have noticed that a lot of them have a certain 'p' sound in them. Off the top of my head... "Spendy." From the first time I ever heard it, just...gives me "flip a table and storm out of the room" feelings. I have no good reason for this.

I know the infamous "moist" was the classic...as made famous by the show, "Dead Like Me" (which was so good, don't ya just gotta love some Mandy Patinkin?) but oddly that one never really bugged me.
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Old 11-02-2023, 12:04 PM
 
Location: SoCal again
20,758 posts, read 19,958,245 times
Reputation: 43158
I had to google a video to understand what UPTALK is. I haven't noticed it anywhere around me but I am guilty of starting many sentences with "So." "So I thought that ...", "So I went to the store...."
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Old 11-02-2023, 12:12 PM
 
2,052 posts, read 996,765 times
Reputation: 6204
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sonic_Spork View Post
Does anyone else have a problem with certain words? There are some perfectly legit words I cannot stand and avoid using just because I find them phonetically irritating. I have noticed that a lot of them have a certain 'p' sound in them. Off the top of my head... "Spendy." From the first time I ever heard it, just...gives me "flip a table and storm out of the room" feelings.
Epic.

I also eye-roll at "amazing". Everything is amazing now - I'd love to read just one recipe online from the thousands of food blogs that doesn't use the word amazing, I don't think it exists, though. One of the female characters on the cartoon Archer says it like "a-MAYYYYzing" just like I hear a lot of women using it in real life.
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Old 11-02-2023, 12:43 PM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
20,369 posts, read 14,644,040 times
Reputation: 39421
Quote:
Originally Posted by heavymind View Post
Epic.

I also eye-roll at "amazing". Everything is amazing now - I'd love to read just one recipe online from the thousands of food blogs that doesn't use the word amazing, I don't think it exists, though. One of the female characters on the cartoon Archer says it like "a-MAYYYYzing" just like I hear a lot of women using it in real life.
Hey at least we seem to have got past "amaze-balls" and "awesome-sauce."
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