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Old 03-02-2024, 04:20 PM
 
Location: on the wind
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Quote:
Originally Posted by L8Gr8Apost8 View Post

Seeing text in a dream seems interesting. One of the other posters on here commented a while back being able to read in a dream in rare. I don't remember ever doing that.
I can recall dream reading; letter, book, newspaper article, a sign, right down to the font or someone's handwriting. One dream in particular was quite ominous, portentive, predicting an approaching holocaust. Part of the prediction was due to something I had just read in a book...during the dream. That dream still scares me decades later.

When I'm working on the mental novel it is primarily imagery, though one of the characters who's come and gone over the years is a writer. Every once in a while, I'll imagine them working on some sort of technical report or a novel of their own and that work led them to becoming involved in MY novel. Sometimes I'll imagine them wrestling with a particular phrase or sentence...then I'll "see" those words in text. One of my primary characters is someone who digs for undiscovered explanations for events important to the novel. I do imagine them searching through libraries/books quite often. While I may not see the words or text itself, I do see different fonts or the handwritten script a particular book was written in quite clearly. The manner or style the book was written in identifies when it was written.

Last edited by Parnassia; 03-02-2024 at 04:35 PM..
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Old 03-03-2024, 09:19 AM
bu2
 
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There's a trend towards multi-sensory education--https://www.rasmussen.edu/degrees/education/blog/types-of-learning-styles/. Perhaps these different ways of thinking are a reflection of the different learning styles.
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Old 03-03-2024, 07:39 PM
 
Location: Camberville
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In my first year of college, we all had to take a seminar class that was on a niche topic meant to help us acclimate to university-level research, discussion, and writing expectations. I ended up taking a psychology class on childhood and imagination, taking to heart the recommendation to take a class far away from your planned major since the class wouldn't count anyway. Day one, the 10 of us in class were directed by the professor to close our eyes around a conference table and we went around the room describing what we "saw" when told to go to our "happy place." Everyone described a calm beach or tropical rainforest or their childhood back yard... and then I was the last to go. I was so blown away and incredulous - I asked did people *really* see something because when I closed my eyes, I just saw the back of my eyelids.

And that's when I learned about aphantasia. I have absolutely no mind's eye and always thought things like "I can picture it now..." was just a figure of speech.

I have always been a big reader, and don't need visualization to enjoy books. It's almost like an internal echolocation. I also have a great autobiographical memory and can describe things in great detail, but that's because for my whole life I've basically memorized my run-on mental narration of the world around me.

Meanwhile, my dad is a hyper visualizer and can play movies back in his head and change angle and rewind at will. My boyfriend is a strong visualizer, but that comes more into play with scent. He's a perfumer by trade and can read perfume notes and smell it in his head.
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Old 03-05-2024, 04:39 AM
 
Location: By The Beach In Maine
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DubbleT View Post
Yes and Yes, however I also have a strong visual component to my thoughts. Reading a book is akin to having a movie playing in my head, I see the settings, the costumes, the characters look a certain way. I 'see' landmarks when thinking about places. Give me a math problem and I visualize the process. I have tested as having great spatial relations, because I 'see' how things fit together.
My daughter, who is also an avid reader, says that her thought process is different, that she does not have a strong visual association with her thoughts. As a child she did better with things like math, telling time, finding her way to a destination if she was given visuals. I assume that she struggles with forming those visuals in her head, and she says she definitely does not see books play out as movies, lol.
THIS! That is exactly what I visualize, but I also have a 'narrator' in my head as I'm reading.

It's like watching a movie that is narrated.

I will say that I envy being able to turn that off for those visualizations that you don't want after someone says something you'd prefer not to know a thing about...unfortunately, it happens. I'd like to be able to turn that off at appropriate times.
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Old 03-05-2024, 08:26 AM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bu2 View Post
There's a trend towards multi-sensory education--https://www.rasmussen.edu/degrees/education/blog/types-of-learning-styles/. Perhaps these different ways of thinking are a reflection of the different learning styles.
Yeah these are definitely connected ideas.

I'm just very curious and interested in the diversity of ways that people's brains function and possible influences and reasons why one might develop to favor one or another way of thinking, feeling, learning.

I also think that, as frustrating as it might be to some folks some times, it really can help us get along to understand that different brains just operate differently. We grow up assuming that whatever our own minds do is normal, and then hear someone describe something that isn't what we're familiar with, and we assume that they are weird or something is maybe wrong with them...when I think it's much more likely that there are a million shades and nuances of "normal" that are not wrong (when they don't cause distress or dysfunction) and it's actually really cool that we have this variance of brain function...it's how we can as individuals, specialize effectively in a wide variety of diverse vocations and activities! It's why we have artists and dancers and mathematicians and historians and people who study penguins and whatever. Life would be so different and (in my opinion) so boring if we were all the same.

So I appreciate everyone who has chimed in to talk about how your thought processes work! Thank you!

I do get some bits of visualization when I read, too, but the narration is far more powerful. The visual and sensory imaginings are less like a movie and more like a quick impression. The imagery is fleeting and indistinct if it's there at all.

But I looooovvve words and language. I have always enjoyed poetry. Sometimes just the choice of words and the phonetic flow of a well constructed sentence gives me a lot of happiness. There is one line from a book I've read many times - every time I come across it, I pause to read it multiple times. The pleasure I get from doing so, reminds me of running my hand over something with a wonderful texture or hearing that one part of a song that is just SO GOOD. And while it relates to a concept that is philosophically meaningful to me, it's really just as much the choice of language used to express it.
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Old 03-11-2024, 02:48 AM
Status: "It's WARY, or LEERY (weary means tired)" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sonic_Spork View Post
But I looooovvve words and language. I have always enjoyed poetry. Sometimes just the choice of words and the phonetic flow of a well constructed sentence gives me a lot of happiness. There is one line from a book I've read many times - every time I come across it, I pause to read it multiple times. The pleasure I get from doing so, reminds me of running my hand over something with a wonderful texture or hearing that one part of a song that is just SO GOOD. And while it relates to a concept that is philosophically meaningful to me, it's really just as much the choice of language used to express it.
That's interesting to me because the daughter I mentioned, who doesn't really visualize much either, is an English major. Like you she has a strong relationship with words, she loves to play with words and sentences, word puzzles and corny puns. And she writes, she writes a LOT, pretty much every day. Even though we are both avid readers her connection with words, as such, is a lot stronger. I think I enjoy books for the stories, I think she likes them for the words they contain.
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Old 03-11-2024, 12:58 PM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DubbleT View Post
That's interesting to me because the daughter I mentioned, who doesn't really visualize much either, is an English major. Like you she has a strong relationship with words, she loves to play with words and sentences, word puzzles and corny puns. And she writes, she writes a LOT, pretty much every day. Even though we are both avid readers her connection with words, as such, is a lot stronger. I think I enjoy books for the stories, I think she likes them for the words they contain.
I like the stories, but the choice of words used to convey them is intensely important to me.

I even like it when unfamiliar words are used, such as those from another language or dialect, if they are such a good contextual fit that they just work. I can usually grasp the meaning immediately but I may look them up later, too. One I'm thinking of, "fossicking." The author describes a dog fossicking in a pile of dead leaves in a garden. I had never heard that word before. Turns out, it's because the author is Australian and the origin/meaning has to do with a particular kind of rock-hounding (the American term!) in areas where they mine opal and other gemstones. You are, in some areas, permitted to go look for what's on the ground or through tailings to see if you find anything. That is fossicking. But what a fun word for a dog rooting through a leaf pile!

You could take the same story, and have it written in two different styles, and the style and skill of the writing is going to really impact whether I enjoy it or not. I do still see the forest (story) but I'm interested in the trees, too. As someone who was always into the fantasy genre, I've found that a lot of male authors write in what feels like a more objective way, less descriptive and sensory, more fact and plot driven. And while I don't think that's terrible...most of my favorite authors are women.

I also very much prefer to read a first hand account of a historical event, rather than an analytical one written long after it happened. School textbooks had me thinking that I had no interest in history. That isn't true, I just don't like the way it's taught, or the (rather excessive to my mind) focus on military history and wars. War is not the only thing that marks an era or defines a timeframe or a culture. Troop movements and battle facts are not interesting to me. But if I get my hands on an autobiography or writing by someone who was there, or even historical fiction with a lot of immersive detail, I can get very into that. I want to understand how people lived, not necessarily how many died as a dry statistic.
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Old 03-11-2024, 07:24 PM
 
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When I’m sober, an internal narrator that never stops talking. When I got me some yummy hemp… i visual it very vividly and think about it all differently. I prefer option #2
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Old 03-12-2024, 05:37 PM
 
Location: At the corner of happy and free
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
I have a very, very verbal inner monologue. My thoughts are exactly like talking out loud, only silent.

It was a surprise to me to learn relatively recently that some people think in images or feelings rather than words.

I was also an early (age 4) and very avid reader. Supposedly no one taught me, I just observed while my parents or older siblings read aloud to me and figured it out. The school suggested that I skip first grade, but my parents were against it (I wish they had agreed). I wouldn't be surprised if the two things, verbal thinking and precocious reading, are linked even if only because verbally is how a particular kind of brain works best.
The bolded is exactly true for me as well.

Interesting premise, OP!
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Old 03-17-2024, 03:53 PM
 
Location: Wisconsin
38,432 posts, read 22,366,957 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sonic_Spork View Post
I was talking to my therapist yesterday about something and it sparked an idea that I am curious about...

I have read that some people think more in words, and some think more in images and/or feelings but without a sort of mental inner monologue. And it's interesting because most grow up not realizing that there are others around them whose thoughts manifest in a different way.

I have an inner narrator. I do have some thoughts that are more of a visualization, but usually not a highly vivid or detailed one. Most of my thinking is in words.

And I was also an insatiable reader as a child, learned to read at a young age, and for most of my life I have one if not multiple books that I am reading at any given time.

What occurred to me, was to wonder if these things might be linked? Could being an early and avid reader contribute to one's mind developing a verbal narrative function in the way that they think?

So I thought maybe I would ask others here... Do your thoughts form as an internal narrative in words, or not? And did you grow up reading a lot, or not so much?
I have a very robust inner monologue. When I read a fiction novel I'll even create unique voices for each of the main characters. I can imagine the colorful world they live in, and what the characters look like.

But when it comes to seeing an apple in my mind, I don't see anything. Well, I will get a sort of momentary flash image of the apple, and then I can describe it. That image is very brief and fleeting, it's not emblazoned in my mind anywhere. So when you folks say you see the apple in your mind, where is the apple? How large is it. Can you rotate it and inspect it, cuz I don't see that, not even close.

If you do see images, do you ever have trouble getting them out of your head?

I do dream very vividly, when i recall my dreams. They are also in color and it's common that those images are very detailed.

So I'm unsure what people see in their heads, and if they also have vivid, detailed colored dreams too? I ask this, because it's common for people to not dream in color, or to only have vague and indistinct images when they recall their dreams.
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