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Old 09-02-2008, 07:03 AM
 
Location: in purgurtory in London
3,721 posts, read 3,755,687 times
Reputation: 1292

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I see this was originally posted in January and the original poster hasn't been back. For anyone who has to make the decision to euthanize can I recommend Mark Levin's book "Rescuing Sprite". The moment I watched his interview last year on Hannity I yanked out my credit card and ordered my copy. There is also a blog.

The Mark Levin Show » Welcome
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Old 09-06-2008, 01:26 PM
 
3 posts, read 18,820 times
Reputation: 10
This is the ultimate final act of love you can show a dying friend. I had to do it and, I think that because my girl was such a good friend to me for 13 years that it was the least that I could do for her. Let her go in peace knowing that she was well loved. You'll always miss your friend but the day will come when you'll think about your friend and smile.
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Old 04-03-2009, 09:25 PM
 
2 posts, read 4,407 times
Reputation: 10
Default Feel guilty

Yesterday my husband and I had to put our pet dog to sleep. The Vet advised us that it was best for him. He was 17 years and in a bad shape. His quality of life was just fading away. He lay in my arms when the vet administered the anaesthetic & he left us peacefully as if in a deep sleep! But I am feeling awfully depressed. We still have another dog to give us comfort. But he is 14 and also getting old and feeble. I hope I will feel less pain as the days go by. But right now the pain is just awful. I also feel so very guilty as if I was responsible for his loss of life. It was nice to find this website and see that I am not alone in this
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Old 04-03-2009, 09:46 PM
 
Location: new jersey
315 posts, read 1,022,957 times
Reputation: 319
i'd like to share something i wrote when a friend of mine lost her beloved dog, mike. although you are feeling the pain of the loss of your faithful friend, please know you gave him the greatest gift possible.

[CENTER]The Last Gift


Memories like rivers run through my mind
A scrapbook of love, brief glimpses in time
Each picture is etched deep in my heart
Held closely and treasured for when we’re apart.


My heart filled with sorrow, eyes filled with tears
For the last time I’ll kiss and caress silky ears
Looking deep in your eyes I’ll know that it’s time
And my heart will be breaking, dear friend of mine.


In your face I see loyalty, wisdom and love
And no trace of fear of what waits above
Trust in our hearts, that this isn’t the end
On to a new journey my sweet, faithful friend.


My last gift to you, who has given so much
Is a hug, a kiss, one last soft, gentle touch
Now you are free, to run without pain
And to wait for the day when we meet again.[/CENTER]
[SIZE=4][SIZE=4][CENTER][/CENTER]
[/SIZE]
[/SIZE]
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Old 04-03-2009, 09:49 PM
 
2 posts, read 4,407 times
Reputation: 10
Thank you so much. This is a very comforting poem and brought peace to me inspite of the pain.
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Old 04-20-2009, 02:16 PM
 
9 posts, read 81,025 times
Reputation: 24
I had my dog, Crunch Tator, put down last week. He was 17 1/2 years old and in a lot of pain from years of severe arthritis, and from a large (and growing) tumor that was most likely cancer. Both ailments were impeding his movement to the extent that he was falling quite often, and I helped him stand up a lot. A week and a half ago I began to realize that he was in pain even when lying down in one of his comfy beds.

A couple of months ago he had what we thought was a stroke. It didn't seem possible that he would recover... but he did. At the time, any time I would try to talk to Crunch about 'moving on' he would seem to get very upset, and it was apparent that he wasn't ready to go. But I talked to him again about a week ago and told him exactly what I think happens when we pass. I told him I believed he would probably get a brand new body and experience unlimited joy and love, but also told him there was no way for me to know for sure. I explained that I was worried about his pain, but didn't want to push him to leave before he was ready to go. He relaxed against me as I talked to him (an unusual thing, since he's not much of a cuddler), and I realized he was probably ready to take his chances with whatever came next.

I'd always promised Crunch that I would be there with him when he died. But I couldn't. Last Wednesday I took him to the vet to find out if his growth was surgical, and she didn't think it was. It came down to putting it off for a few days, showering him with my sadness and anxiety (and love) the whole time... or simply going ahead and taking the plunge. Crunch was as happy and excited as I'd seen him in a long time and I realized that if it was a choice between causing him more pain and anxiety, or leaving the room and delivering Crunch in to the loving hands of my vet and her technician (who were down on the floor petting and fawning over him), the better choice was to leave. I tried to do that before he could catch my fear and grief and anxiety, but I did get to lay down with him for a minute, and even pick him up an hold him for a few seconds (which he always hated) before I left.

That was one of the hardest and most painful things I have ever experienced in my life. I miss him so much. His soft, blonde fur. The way he liked it when I rubbed his faced and ears. His youth, when he was always so ready for a bounding walk, and when his favorite thing in the world was, simply, to play. I miss his steadiness, and his stoicism, and his absolute trustworthiness. I even miss knowing I'll never have another wheaten terrier (we accidentally picked eachother out at a kill shelter in Dallas in the early 90's - he had mange at the time, and I had no idea what a gem had fallen in to my life).

I believe in what I told Crunch, and I have often felt his happy presence around me since we parted ways. But my doubts about the actual existence of an afterlife sometimes haunt me. For the most part, I fall back on my faith (which always includes doubts), and on my memories, and on the knowledge that he was so old and frail and in so much pain before he passed away.

Wow, this post sounds so morbid and I don't mean for it to. I'm just so sad. Which is appropriate. He was loved this much and more.
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Old 04-20-2009, 02:20 PM
 
Location: Manhattan, Ks
1,280 posts, read 6,551,739 times
Reputation: 1810
I don't think your post is morbid txpacotaco. I think it's beautiful.
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Old 04-20-2009, 02:26 PM
 
756 posts, read 2,061,903 times
Reputation: 633
Quote:
Originally Posted by txpacotaco View Post
I had my dog, Crunch Tator, put down last week. He was 17 1/2 years old and in a lot of pain from years of severe arthritis, and from a large (and growing) tumor that was most likely cancer. Both ailments were impeding his movement to the extent that he was falling quite often, and I helped him stand up a lot. A week and a half ago I began to realize that he was in pain even when lying down in one of his comfy beds.

A couple of months ago he had what we thought was a stroke. It didn't seem possible that he would recover... but he did. At the time, any time I would try to talk to Crunch about 'moving on' he would seem to get very upset, and it was apparent that he wasn't ready to go. But I talked to him again about a week ago and told him exactly what I think happens when we pass. I told him I believed he would probably get a brand new body and experience unlimited joy and love, but also told him there was no way for me to know for sure. I explained that I was worried about his pain, but didn't want to push him to leave before he was ready to go. He relaxed against me as I talked to him (an unusual thing, since he's not much of a cuddler), and I realized he was probably ready to take his chances with whatever came next.

I'd always promised Crunch that I would be there with him when he died. But I couldn't. Last Wednesday I took him to the vet to find out if his growth was surgical, and she didn't think it was. It came down to putting it off for a few days, showering him with my sadness and anxiety (and love) the whole time... or simply going ahead and taking the plunge. Crunch was as happy and excited as I'd seen him in a long time and I realized that if it was a choice between causing him more pain and anxiety, or leaving the room and delivering Crunch in to the loving hands of my vet and her technician (who were down on the floor petting and fawning over him), the better choice was to leave. I tried to do that before he could catch my fear and grief and anxiety, but I did get to lay down with him for a minute, and even pick him up an hold him for a few seconds (which he always hated) before I left.

That was one of the hardest and most painful things I have ever experienced in my life. I miss him so much. His soft, blonde fur. The way he liked it when I rubbed his faced and ears. His youth, when he was always so ready for a bounding walk, and when his favorite thing in the world was, simply, to play. I miss his steadiness, and his stoicism, and his absolute trustworthiness. I even miss knowing I'll never have another wheaten terrier (we accidentally picked eachother out at a kill shelter in Dallas in the early 90's - he had mange at the time, and I had no idea what a gem had fallen in to my life).

I believe in what I told Crunch, and I have often felt his happy presence around me since we parted ways. But my doubts about the actual existence of an afterlife sometimes haunt me. For the most part, I fall back on my faith (which always includes doubts), and on my memories, and on the knowledge that he was so old and frail and in so much pain before he passed away.

Wow, this post sounds so morbid and I don't mean for it to. I'm just so sad. Which is appropriate. He was loved this much and more.
Oh, I am so sorry for your loss. What a brave, loving thing you did for him.
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Old 04-20-2009, 03:11 PM
 
78 posts, read 205,335 times
Reputation: 70
What amazingly wonderful people on this thread! Txpacotaco I experienced a visit from my dog Cannon after he died. He was an extraordinary german shepherd. He went to work each day with my husband who worked in a car dealership. Cannon always laid down at the front door and people had to step over him. People went there just to visit him and took their kids to see him. I think he saw it as his job. The local community all knew Cannon (named after Cannon Mountain in New Hampshire). At the age of seven this vibrant animal suddenly developed a neurological disorder. We took him to a neurologist in the next state but they were unable to save him. Cannon died there. Before I received the call my cocker spaniel Max and I were sitting in the family room. the master bedroom is overhead. Cannon always laid on the bed and when he awoke he would jump down, shake at the top of the stairs and run down. Both Max and I heard the sounds at the same time and looked up. There was a thump, a shaking of fur and run down the stairs. When the vet called I already knew he was gone. I can't imagine meeting another animal like him and probably won't but I know there are other amazing animals out there and when I least expect it there he or she will be.
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Old 04-20-2009, 05:00 PM
 
2,560 posts, read 6,270,160 times
Reputation: 1063
We had a black and yellow lab at the same time and lost the black lab 5 years ago and the yellow just a year and a half ago. We miss them dearly, our yellow lab was pure sugar. A year ago we got our new pup and since he is our 3rd lab of course he has his lab traits. But all 3 had thier own wonderful personalities and quirks that makes them so special in their own way. Although it is hard when you lose a great friend I can't imagine my life with out a dog.

The dog is a gentleman; I hope to go to his heaven, not man's. ~Mark Twain, letter to W.D. Howells, 2 April 1899
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