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Old 07-03-2007, 02:48 PM
 
Location: Hillsborough
2,825 posts, read 6,400,493 times
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I live in a sub very near to the pp who lives in Grove Park. Mine is called Marbrey Landing. Homes here are in the mid to upper 100's and have 1/4 acre lots. We are trying to sell and are having some trouble. We've been on the market for 4 months now with no luck. It's not just us, there are several others in our neighborhood in the same boat. I think that people don't like our schools. When we moved here, we didn't have any kids, so we didn't really care about the schools, but I think it is hitting us in resale. We've been here 6 years and are just trying to break even after paying the realtor.

We also commute to Duke and it's about 15 minutes. Very easy commute with no traffic.
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Old 07-03-2007, 06:23 PM
 
Location: Cary, NC
11 posts, read 41,051 times
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There are a lot of relatively new sub divisions at proximity to Duke in Durham. I am sure you can get all these info and all your questions answered by your real estate agent. I like southpoint, it's close to verything. Brightleaf is a new community as you know, and lot sizes for new construction homes are always smaller than the older homes, so don't expect a large lot. This area is booming (RTP area), home communities suggested above will appreciate. There's no doubt, but some area may appreciate more than others.
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Old 07-04-2007, 08:30 AM
 
5,524 posts, read 9,285,333 times
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Where are those "good" parts of Durham. Seems like everytime we find somewhere that is not overpriced it's right around the corner from a not so desirable section to live near.
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Old 07-04-2007, 11:48 AM
 
23 posts, read 76,737 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lamishra View Post
We live in wake and honestly if I were in your shoes (newly weds, first home, no kids, and need to be close to Duke) I'd seriously look in Durham COunty where previous posters have mentioned. I agree that home values will probably increase more quickly in Wake, but that is the nature of buying in a large, high growth county. Your home values will still appreicate there if you make a good buying decision. I think that area will grow quickly, maybe just not quite as quickly as Wake, which is really not necessarily a bad thing. My biggest concern would be the schools, but since you don't have to worry about that, Durham County seems like it would be a good place for your situation. Having a decent sized lot in Wake County is going the way of the dinosaur, and you can probably find an actual yard in Durham Co which will definitely be positive selling point in the future.
True, more land with a home in Durham Co can be a positive selling point. I guess I'm curious as to what the "good parts" of Durham Co are aside from the developments from Southpoint Mall...I've read previous postings that say the area around S. Miami Blvd and Route 70 in Durham aren't that desirable...
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Old 07-04-2007, 11:51 AM
 
23 posts, read 76,737 times
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Default Slab?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikeheel View Post
Jason,

It really all just depends, but the housing market in Durham is doing just fine. I think in terms of appreciation, the "good" parts of Durham are keeping pace with Wake Co.

Interestingly, my plan is to keep the house we are building in Brightleaf for 5 years and then sell it. I think that will be very good timing in that part of Durham.

Brightleaf does have houses starting in the 190s. They are by Standard Pacific and are built on slab foundations. They also have a section by Standard Pacific that starts in the mid 200s; these are also built on slab. You have to get in the mid 300s (Drees or St. Lawrence) to get off the slab foundations.

Slabs have a somewhat bad reputation in this area but are losing some of the negative rep.

Of course, the lots at Brightleaf in the mid 200s are not nearly as large as the lots in the mid 400s.

Personal plug - I'll be selling my current house (probably for about 250k) just after the new year, but that will be out of your timeframe. My current house is near Southpoint Mall, just off I-40 in Durham. I think it is a great location, but we've been here seven years and it's time to take a step up. It was built in 2000 and has about 2500 sq feet (4BR, 2.5 BA, plus bonus room) on a lot that is slightly larger than 1/3 acre. That should give you some idea of what you can expect in the area for the mid 200s. Good luck!

Mike
Mike- thanks for the info...do you mind explaining the characteristics of a "slab foundation" vs. other foundations that houses are built on? Is this something to take into consideration while we're looking for a home? Aside from the areas around Southpoint, what are other "good areas" of Durham?
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Old 07-04-2007, 11:57 AM
 
23 posts, read 76,737 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by donna78 View Post
We live in a subdivision off US98 (Wake Forest Highyway) in NE Durham. Convenient to everything, very reasonable prices (mid100s-high 200s). Golf course community or lakeside. The subdivision is grove park. There is a pool, tennis courts, gym, volleyball court. Very well maintained neighborhood. I also work at Duke Medical Center and have a 15 minute, no traffic commute which is great. Before this we lived in S. Cary and that was a hell of a commute. Homes also turn around pretty quick in Grove Park.
Donna- do you happen to have co-workers that commute from NW Raleigh (areas by Glenwood Ave, Leesville Rd)? Although my commute would be short driving to Duke, my wife is still looking for a job at other hospitals besides Duke...if she lands a position at WakeMed for example the commute might be too much if we settled on your area in Durham or the Southpoint area...Being in NW Raleigh seems to be in the "middle" of the area hospitals...
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Old 07-04-2007, 12:11 PM
 
3,021 posts, read 10,369,310 times
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Tluv00, there are plenty of attractive areas within Durham. I am most familar with southern Durham since that's where we chose to buy (the areas in zip codes 27713 & 27707). The homes here are more expensive than where ADVentive lives, but we decided we'd rather pay more and live in a neighborhood we truly love in the part of town we visit most often. Even when we lived in Hillsborough, we found that we were always driving down to eastern Chapel Hill and southwestern Durham, so that's why we bought there. Our neighborhood - Woodcroft - is lovely and there are lots of other beautiful neighborhoods in the area, both large and small, existing and new construction.
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Old 07-04-2007, 01:44 PM
 
Location: Holly Springs
3,959 posts, read 10,037,448 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jayvills View Post
Mike- thanks for the info...do you mind explaining the characteristics of a "slab foundation" vs. other foundations that houses are built on?

I am a building inspector with extensive knowledge of foundations. There is absolutely nothing better or worse about slabs from a structural standpoint. The pros and cons are this:
Pros:
no rotted floors or any other issues related to crawlspaces, be it humidity/moisture or insect/animal intrusion
more for your money because slabs are less expensive to build compared to a crawl/basement

cons:
no crawlspace access for running home theater wires etc
slabs almost require high grade padding for carpets on the ground level
slightly more susceptible to termites since they dont have as far to go to reach the wood structure

slabs are extremely common in many areas of the country like florida for example. they are relatively new to our market so people are still getting used to them. Hope this helps, if you want more info feel free to ask away and I will give you all the boring in-depth detail you desire lol.
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Old 07-04-2007, 08:50 PM
 
Location: Austin TX
959 posts, read 4,267,459 times
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From a resale/school standpoint, the Jordan high school area is considered the most desirable in Durham county - this past year it was ranked #190 out of all the public high schools in the country by Newsweek. Locally, Riverside and Northern high schools are also considered high quality high schools. Newsweek ranked them #855 and #814 respectively, which still puts them in the top 5% of American public high schools.

Here is Newsweek's criteria:

Quote:
Public schools are ranked according to a ratio devised by Jay Mathews: the number of Advanced Placement, Intl. Baccalaureate and/or Cambridge tests taken by all students at a school in 2006 divided by the number of graduating seniors. All of the schools on the list have an index of at least 1.000; they are in the top 5 percent of public schools measured this way.
And a link to the NC high schools that made their top 1000.

America's Top Public High Schools - Newsweek America's Best High Schools - MSNBC.com (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/18757087/?sort=Rank&count=1236&start=0&limit=100&year=2005& Search=NC - broken link)
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Old 07-04-2007, 09:09 PM
 
Location: Hillsborough
2,825 posts, read 6,400,493 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Indigoblue View Post
From a resale/school standpoint, the Jordan high school area is considered the most desirable in Durham county - this past year it was ranked #190 out of all the public high schools in the country by Newsweek. Locally, Riverside and Northern high schools are also considered high quality high schools.
That's interesting. I didn't realize that Northern was ranked that high. I always thought that it was just Jordan and Riverside that were considered pretty good (well, and Durham School of the Arts which is excellent).
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