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Raleigh, Durham, Chapel Hill, Cary The Triangle Area
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Old 03-02-2011, 07:11 PM
 
22 posts, read 72,549 times
Reputation: 34

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Is anyone else feeling disappointed with this area? Do you feel like it doesn't live up to all the hype?

I moved here with my sister a few years ago. She has some severe mental health problems. Finding useful and effective help for her here, especially in the Chapel Hill and Carrboro area, has been like pulling teeth. She has found it incredibly difficult to find a therapist in Chapel Hill and Carrboro who is experienced with her issues and is grounded and understanding. Most therapists working here are not used to anything very serious and seem to be lightweights with little to no experience with very serious mental problems and complex family issues. They also have little to no experience with immigrants and minorities.

She has seen bodywork practitioners in Chapel Hill and Carrboro who're revered as wise teachers and they're really not as experienced or kind as they've been made out to be. It just seems like the only expert professionals in this area who live up to their reputations are some medical doctors. Otherwise most other 'experts' here are not really that knowledgeable or experienced and they're sort of uncomfortable working with people who're not white, heterosexual and American-born.

Which brings me to my second point. This area, especially Chapel Hill and Carrboro, is incredibly segregated. Every racial group has its own hangouts. ANyone breaching these racial divides gets a lot of looks and uncomfortable body language.

The guy who wrote the books about the creative class, Richard Florida, has praised this area as being a haven for artists, writers, musicians and designers. So far I have encountered very few people who are actually able to make a living doing something creative. Most people here pursue artistic work as a hobby or as part time work. And the quality of the art/design work is not very good.

As far as the famed Southern friendliness goes, it's not really friendliness as much as it's about a strong focus on courtesy and avoiding bluntness. For the most part, when Southerners can tell that someone is not from here, they're very nice but they make sure to keep their distance.

To me, the Triangle area seems like a sort of island that distances itself from the larger poverty and lack of education in this state, but doesn't have that much to offer people who need specialized help with mental health, and job opportunities about anything besides tech work and healthcare.

All of these are the standard concerns that come from living in any small Southern town. But what makes the Triangle area different is the hype surrounding it. There's very few other smaller towns and cities that get this level of praise and adulation. The contrast between the adulation and the reality is really stark.

For people who were raised here and identify as Southern, I don't think you understand the extent to which people outside this area get bombarded with glowing reports about this area. I'm guessing a lot of the hype is driven by PR and marketing efforts for the local real estate development companies.

is anyone else feeling ... underwhelmed and kinda duped?
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Old 03-02-2011, 09:15 PM
 
147 posts, read 451,283 times
Reputation: 306
1. "I'm guessing a lot of the hype is driven by PR and marketing efforts for the local real estate development companies." You have begun to see the truth. There is no Shangri-la.

2. Name a place for where the rest of your post is true. The large cities and liberal states where "artists" want to live (NYC, LA, SF etc.) are outrageously expensive and impossible for most artists who are not independently wealthy to survive. College towns (Chapel Hill, Athens, Madison etc.) have high quality-of-life and relatively low cost of living, but this has changed dramatically for the worse over the past 10 years. The truth is that the galleries that matter are in NYC or LA or Berlin or other MAJOR metropolitan areas. Most artists that want to try and "make it" are forced to move to NYC or LA. Why not ask where all the fashion designers or filmmakers or rock stars are? I'll tell you where they are. Brooklyn, West Hollywood maybe Los Feliz.

3. Nowhere that I know of is doing much of anything for severely mentally ill people, at least in terms of state level support, especially these days with historic deficits. Just ask the 40,000+ people living in the cardboard box shanty town in downtown LA or the hoards of mentally ill folks haunting the forests of Golden Gate Park.

3. Name a place that is not incredibly segregated, whether it be by class or race. The most segregated place that I think I have ever been, where there ARE people of different races, is Boston. Move to Durham, you'll see more diversity.

4. If you're from LI or NJ the hype was deafening because the quality-of-life in those places is so low, Chapel Hill almost is Shangri-la.
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Old 03-02-2011, 09:29 PM
 
3,071 posts, read 8,518,146 times
Reputation: 2089
Not directly responding to your post, bu you could look for mental health professionals around Goldsboro, NC. I know it's a bit of a trek, but due to the presence of Cherry and O'Berry Hospital there are an insane number of psychiatric private practices for a town of it's size. Cherry was founded in 1880 as a "Asylum for Colored Insane".


Quote:
Originally Posted by KP11 View Post
Is anyone else feeling disappointed with this area? Do you feel like it doesn't live up to all the hype?

I moved here with my sister a few years ago. She has some severe mental health problems. Finding useful and effective help for her here, especially in the Chapel Hill and Carrboro area, has been like pulling teeth. She has found it incredibly difficult to find a therapist in Chapel Hill and Carrboro who is experienced with her issues and is grounded and understanding. Most therapists working here are not used to anything very serious and seem to be lightweights with little to no experience with very serious mental problems and complex family issues. They also have little to no experience with immigrants and minorities.

She has seen bodywork practitioners in Chapel Hill and Carrboro who're revered as wise teachers and they're really not as experienced or kind as they've been made out to be. It just seems like the only expert professionals in this area who live up to their reputations are some medical doctors. Otherwise most other 'experts' here are not really that knowledgeable or experienced and they're sort of uncomfortable working with people who're not white, heterosexual and American-born.

Which brings me to my second point. This area, especially Chapel Hill and Carrboro, is incredibly segregated. Every racial group has its own hangouts. ANyone breaching these racial divides gets a lot of looks and uncomfortable body language.

The guy who wrote the books about the creative class, Richard Florida, has praised this area as being a haven for artists, writers, musicians and designers. So far I have encountered very few people who are actually able to make a living doing something creative. Most people here pursue artistic work as a hobby or as part time work. And the quality of the art/design work is not very good.

As far as the famed Southern friendliness goes, it's not really friendliness as much as it's about a strong focus on courtesy and avoiding bluntness. For the most part, when Southerners can tell that someone is not from here, they're very nice but they make sure to keep their distance.

To me, the Triangle area seems like a sort of island that distances itself from the larger poverty and lack of education in this state, but doesn't have that much to offer people who need specialized help with mental health, and job opportunities about anything besides tech work and healthcare.

All of these are the standard concerns that come from living in any small Southern town. But what makes the Triangle area different is the hype surrounding it. There's very few other smaller towns and cities that get this level of praise and adulation. The contrast between the adulation and the reality is really stark.

For people who were raised here and identify as Southern, I don't think you understand the extent to which people outside this area get bombarded with glowing reports about this area. I'm guessing a lot of the hype is driven by PR and marketing efforts for the local real estate development companies.

is anyone else feeling ... underwhelmed and kinda duped?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-03-2011, 12:48 AM
 
3,265 posts, read 3,012,693 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KP11 View Post
She has seen bodywork practitioners in Chapel Hill and Carrboro who're revered as wise teachers and they're really not as experienced or kind as they've been made out to be. It just seems like the only expert professionals in this area who live up to their reputations are some medical doctors. Otherwise most other 'experts' here are not really that knowledgeable or experienced and they're sort of uncomfortable working with people who're not white, heterosexual and American-born.
Well, that's sort of an issue with the whole new age spiritual movement, as it's largely an upper-middle to upper class white enterprise to begin with. If your sister has mental health problems, you should be looking for actual mental health professionals. New age quacks aren't meant to deal with actual medical stuff.


Here's the number for Orange Co. Social Services: (919) 245-2800. Ask for an adult services worker and they'll give you info about mental health options in the area.


This however

Quote:
To me, the Triangle area seems like a sort of island that distances itself from the larger poverty and lack of education in this state
is gospel truth.
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Old 03-03-2011, 01:13 AM
 
1,738 posts, read 817,907 times
Reputation: 1381
In this economy-- I think you'd be hard pressed to find too many people actually making a lucrative living in the arts just about anywhere... putting food on the table and gas in the tank take priority over buying "quality... art/design work", I'm afraid.

Last edited by Green Irish Eyes; 03-03-2011 at 07:33 PM.. Reason: Please discuss the topic, not each other.
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Old 03-03-2011, 06:05 AM
 
9,196 posts, read 23,910,276 times
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If someone moved here based on hype and PR, rather a personal evaluation of the area, its amenities, and its fit for that person - I would say that person made a huge mistake.
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Old 03-03-2011, 06:23 AM
 
Location: Downtown Durham, NC
915 posts, read 2,291,356 times
Reputation: 732
Quote:
Originally Posted by KP11 View Post
The guy who wrote the books about the creative class, Richard Florida, has praised this area as being a haven for artists, writers, musicians and designers. So far I have encountered very few people who are actually able to make a living doing something creative. Most people here pursue artistic work as a hobby or as part time work. And the quality of the art/design work is not very good.

That whole "creative class" thing isn't all about artists. It's a very broad term that pretty much includes every creative-type job. Scientific research, engineering, and architecture also count in Florida's numbers. That's why he picked Durham as the #1 place for the creative class a few years ago-- we have a huge number of research and engineering jobs.
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Old 03-03-2011, 06:30 AM
 
Location: ITB Raleigh, NC
814 posts, read 1,921,186 times
Reputation: 680
You know, I keep hearing all this talk about "hype" from people that moved here from NJ and NY. Who is doing this hype. Are there actual ads that you see saying this is Shangri-La, or is it people that you talk to in your neighorhood, grocery store, etc.

Or are you talking about ads for developments down here? If so, are there similar ads for new developments all across the country? And for that matter, aren't all cities calling themselves the "city on the rise" or somesuch?

I can't say I know what ACTUAL "hype" you are talking about.
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Old 03-03-2011, 06:30 AM
 
6,273 posts, read 15,417,682 times
Reputation: 4760
I've always thought it was over-hyped.

But it all depends on where you are from and what you are looking for.

Major media hubs are in NYC and LA.

In many ways, it's easier (less expensive, less congested) to live in the Triangle than NYC or LA.

So the writers in those media hubs WRITE about the differences, and the Triangle quite often comes out ahead.

There are plenty of places to live between LA and NYC, but there aren't as many people WRITING about them.
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Old 03-03-2011, 08:12 AM
 
Location: ITB Raleigh, NC
814 posts, read 1,921,186 times
Reputation: 680
But who is writing? Is it these "best of" lists that people are relying solely on to believe that this is Shangri-la? Is it people around the watercooler at work saying it (eg. my sisters friend lives there and says its great!).

Is it ads on the TV, magazines?

Where is this hype?

I am just wondering cause people always talk about "all the hype" about Raleigh/Durham and, other than the "best of" lists, I have no idea what they are talking about.

I moved here cause I got a job offer. I came down and checked it out before I accepted, looking at neighorhoods, prices, etc. And I came 1997, when it was much different than now...much better place to live now.

I moved here from D.C. and think there is MUCH more to do here. There was tons to do in DC, but it was hard to get tickets, tickets cost more, hard to get to places...so I found out that I did not do as much...other than go out to dinner, drinks, play volleyball....etc. all things I could do here. But here, I do much more arts and culture stuff, cause it is all here and more easy to access.

So, what is all this "hype"...my theory is that it is just other people in NY and NJ calling us the promised land when talking to each other, cause when I travel, I haven't seen any "hype" about us in the media.
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