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Old 09-10-2011, 11:48 AM
 
1 posts, read 1,248 times
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Hello! My husband and I (30 years old) are from Cincinnati, OH but have lived in Portland, OR for the past 8 years. We are starting to consider and research moving from Portland to NC in the next year or so. We love love living in Portland for so many reasons: small city feel, tons of young, like minded people, the way of life (walking to stores, biking), outdoor activities, organic, healthy food, the music scene, etc. etc. What we are tiring of is the late start to a short summer, long, rainy winters and being so far away from family (plane rides to Cincinnati). North Carolina seems to be the closest alternative to Portland in terms of having mountains, hiking, lakes and the ocean (we love the appalacians). In Portland, we live close in to the downtown area but live in area that you would never know the city is 5 minutes away. We love unique bungalow type homes, not cookie cutter with access to restaurants and stores.

Has anyone been or lived in Portland and can help me navigate what areas to consider and what to rule out? I have a feeling we may need to start out living closer to a big city but someday we would love to live in a smaller town, less city with a bit of land. We like that Asheville is closest to mountains and to Cincinnati but I know it is hard to get a job there. Thank you for your help!
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Old 09-10-2011, 01:27 PM
 
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I think a good source of information for you may be Our State magazine, you can find it at ourstate.com. Their reviews of towns and cities in North Carolina should give you a feel for different areas in the state. I think their articles are well written, and very informative. If I were moving to a different state I would want to read a similiar publication.
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Old 09-10-2011, 01:30 PM
 
Location: River's Edge Inn, Todd NC, and Lorgues France
1,738 posts, read 2,578,948 times
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" .... the late start to a short summer ..."
Well, here in the triangle you are guaranteed an early start to a long Hot and Humid summer. And forget about walking anywhere or commuting by bicycle. If you must come out here, see if you can find a job in Asheville or Boone.
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Old 09-10-2011, 01:35 PM
 
Location: A blue island in the Piedmont
34,117 posts, read 83,097,094 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eastwest2011 View Post

Has anyone been or lived in Portland and can help me navigate what areas to consider and what to rule out?
Thank you for your help!
You're looking to get far too much from one location.
It's well over 400 miles from Asheville to the coast and nearly 500 to Hatteras.

And of the other areas where it will still be hard to find jobs, and especially good jobs...
you'll be trading winter rain and gloom for summer heat and humidity.
---

I'm near Winston-Salem which is about 50 miles from the BRP...
and is an actual City with all (well, most) of the social and cultural amenities most could ask for.
But it sure isn't PDX.

As has been addressed in most "where to go" threads... it all starts with having enough income to make the rest work.
Focus on that. Both the what and where of that but also how to make the inevitable compromises work.

hth
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Old 09-10-2011, 01:41 PM
 
Location: Wake Forest
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It is hard to know. I think you will be pleasantly surprised by the price of housing here, but probably disappointed with the infrastructure (the buses are not fantastic, and it is hard to get around "the city" with them).

I think Durham and Downtown raleigh are probably closest in the foodie department, you will find loads of restaurants that utilize local ingredients, organic, etc - not as many chain restaurants, and just a good vibe of food.

Durham is a great place, living close to the american tobacco district, the lofts near the brightleaf area give you the ability to walk to places for food, entertainment, etc

Downtown raleigh definitely has more of a city feel, but you could live in the homes throughout the 5 points, boylan heights area and still have easy access to downtown restaurants, bars, plays, etc

I believe both areas are nice, but downtown raleigh is bigger, has more restaurants, etc.

Leigh
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Old 09-10-2011, 02:48 PM
 
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Hi eastwest, we moved from Portland (SE... Westmorland / Sellwood) to Durham in 2007. Lived in Oregon for 20 years most of those in Portland. I will preface my post with I LOVE LOVE LOVE Portland it's close n'hoods. And think that for me personally Portland is the best fit in terms of cities and weather. But my hubby was tired of the rain and we were worried about the state of public education (both k-12 & college) in Oregon.

We settled in the Durham... in the burbs. Yup, HUGE adjustment going from Westmoreland to the burbs. But we do love the quiet and we actually can see starts at night.

There are a few areas sort of like Portland, but the do fall short in the unique Portland department. But they have other attributes that you might like. We made good friends really quick here.... got lots of invitations to dinner and bbqs etc right away. I think it can take longer to get to know people in Portland... i think the rain makes folks introverted.

The biggest thing to consider is distance to your job when looking at location. The Triangle is really spread out... Wake Co is about twice the size land mass wise as Multnomah County. I think they counties are close in population size, but it's much more spread out.

In Raleigh, check out the old neighborhoods Inside The Beltline (ITB). Here's a link showing you some of those neighborhoods: Raleigh N.C. Real Estate Information

ITB is older, established n'hoods. Some you will find walkable and some you will find have pocket that are walkable. Raleigh's downtown does not have as much going on as Portland... but Raleigh is also smaller.

Durham: the closer you are to Duke or Downtown Durham the older the n'hoods. Some n'hoods to consider are Trinity Park, Old West Durham, Duke Park, Golden Belt, Old North Durham, Old West Durham, Trinity Heights, Watts Hillandale, & Morehead Hill.

Chapel Hill is the closest to Portland in terms of demographics and political leanings. It is a college town for a large part and only has like 55K people. Near the university there are beautiful old homes, but the COL in CH is about what is is in Portland. And I personally don't think CH has the appeal Portland has, so we could not justify the cost. Housing is more expensive there because their schools are considered some of the best in the state.

Lots of people like Carrboro which runs right into Chapel Hill. But it's even smaller than CH.

Now with that said, I could not imagine moving from Portland to a small town. But I wish we had considered that... maybe because the burbs are not a long time fit for us. ?? But Pittsboro & Hillsborough are really great small towns. But with some older homes. Both have left leaning folks. Pboro has a great food co-op... my fav in the area. But it does seem "out there" distance wise to me even still.

If you have children or plan to have them factor in the schools discussion. Each area has it's own challenges in terms of public schools.

The poster who said summer comes early and stays long is correct. There are many days in the summer that it's just to hot and oppressive to go out after 9 am and before 10 pm, imho. Fall is wonderful here, but to me it's short. It will still be summer all through September... it's not as hot as it was, but it's not fall yet. The winters have been mixed. A couple of winters it was really pleasant but others were a little more cold and windy than one would think for the South. But nothing like OH so you'll be fine.

Spring is great... it starts early... late February and doesn't stay long. I miss the crisp, cool misty mornings in the spring & fall in Oregon. But like I said I love the weather there.

All of our family is here in NC, so I understand how those long flights and long distance from family is hard.

Here it is harder to find good hard crusted bread (I so miss Grand Central Bakery!!!), good coffee, and I miss the fresh salmon. BUT here you will find the summer fruits and veggies come earlier and the peaches are sweeter and it's hard to find a good biscuit in Portland but here they are everywhere. And NC has real shrimp instead of those microscopic things from the coast of Oregon.

If you have specific questions let me know.
Good luck with your research.
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Old 09-10-2011, 03:00 PM
 
3,155 posts, read 10,763,934 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by leighbhe View Post
Downtown raleigh definitely has more of a city feel, but you could live in the homes throughout the 5 points, boylan heights area and still have easy access to downtown restaurants, bars, plays, etc
I agree with Leigh on this in terms of comparing downtowns in the area. But downtown Raleigh never feels "downtownish" to me. I think it's because the skyline isn't as dense or high as Portland. There part of downtown Raleigh that always feels like Lloyd Center to me... minus Max. You just have to come and walk around and see what you guys think.

I should note Downtown Durham feels even less downtownish to me. It reminds me of downtown Hillsboro, Or... just bigger.

Lastly, I highly recommend renting before you buy. That way you can get a feel for the area. And like I said the area is spread out. Who knows you might decide you want to live in Hillsborough.
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