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Old 10-08-2011, 07:20 AM
 
982 posts, read 1,508,713 times
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This forthcoming May, I will be graduating with an Associate of Applied Science in Electromechanical Technology. And I wish to finally avail myself of the area I live in to move to a large, vibrant city that is really on the up-and-up. So let me lay down the facts of my situation and allow you to judge whether or not my plan for moving is sound:
  • I have some industrial electrical experience, a two-year degree, and a certificate from the NCCER. Nevertheless, I am willing to work whatever job I can find when I hit the pavement until I find a job in my field.
  • I will have approximately $12,000-14,000 to move and get set up.
  • I do not want an apartment to myself. I want to room with other people to reduce the cost of living.

I intend on creating this post in several forums of prospective locations to ascertain whether or not my plan is sound.
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Old 10-08-2011, 11:04 AM
 
Location: NC
2,011 posts, read 2,955,574 times
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Get a job FIRST and then move. Move to wherever you get work in this economy.
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Old 10-08-2011, 11:51 AM
 
982 posts, read 1,508,713 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by escapenc View Post
Get a job FIRST and then move. Move to wherever you get work in this economy.
That doesn't make sense. There are very few places that are going to hire a person without them living near them. It just doesn't happen. And I do not want to remain where I am at. The point of this post is that I am trying to move to places that are experiencing a lot of growth so finding a job in the field I am in won't be so difficult.
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Old 10-08-2011, 01:06 PM
 
6,253 posts, read 15,135,265 times
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Monitor the job boards of various cities. Simply sign up for different "alerts" with Indeed.com, using different locations. Indeed.com consolidates several job websites. After a while, you should have a good idea of where you may have a good chance of getting the job you want.

As far as "growth," this area is suffering just like everywhere else. Monitoring the jobs yourself will give you a good idea if there IS activity in your field in a particular location.

You shouldn't have any trouble finding roommates on Craigslist. It's dangerous territory though, as far as moving in with strangers. Be sure you check their backgrounds, criminal backgrounds, and credit histories. Seriously. Their behavior will affect YOUR life.

It'd be crazy just to move here and just hope for a job. You may go through your moving expenses very quickly. Just do your research before selecting a location, and you should be fine. Good luck.
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Old 10-08-2011, 03:30 PM
 
149 posts, read 193,141 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lovebrentwood View Post
Monitor the job boards of various cities. Simply sign up for different "alerts" with Indeed.com, using different locations. Indeed.com consolidates several job websites. After a while, you should have a good idea of where you may have a good chance of getting the job you want.

As far as "growth," this area is suffering just like everywhere else. Monitoring the jobs yourself will give you a good idea if there IS activity in your field in a particular location.

You shouldn't have any trouble finding roommates on Craigslist. It's dangerous territory though, as far as moving in with strangers. Be sure you check their backgrounds, criminal backgrounds, and credit histories. Seriously. Their behavior will affect YOUR life.

It'd be crazy just to move here and just hope for a job. You may go through your moving expenses very quickly. Just do your research before selecting a location, and you should be fine. Good luck.
Exactly. Too often, I see starry-eyed people moving to towns thinking that jobs will be there for the taking, and I see the sad result later. Make sure you have something lined up first. If the pay is decent, you might actually be able to live in a studio apartment by yourself and skip the roomie step, but again, lovebrentwood's advice is sound ... check these people out thoroughly.

As to whether or not we're experiencing growth ... I would advise that you look at the online articles in our newspaper, The N & O, as well as chatting to people here, and make your own conclusions. Check out unemployment figures in the Triangle and in the state, and mentally double the figure. The unemployment rates tell only part of the story. Millions of Americans have fallen off the rolls because their benefits ran out, and NC is no exception. Thousands here are working at barely-minimum wage or otherwise low-paying jobs or part-time because there is nothing in their field. I've also seen too many unemployed living in the area not be able to find a sustainable job after one, two, three or even more years of unemployment. It's like that across the country, of course. All the more reason to make sure there is something for you to start with here, then hopefully, your other plans can fall into place.

It is not impossible to find employers who might be willing to hire someone out of state, but I agree that it will be difficult ... once again, nationwide. But it is not impossible, particularly if you are willing to take contract work. You will very likely have to pay part or all of your own relo costs (most employers aren't nearly as generous as they used to be), but you seem to have money set aside for that, so that's good. You are single and (I believe) under 35, so you have that going for you.

Good luck!

Last edited by gazania; 10-08-2011 at 03:47 PM..
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Old 10-08-2011, 07:41 PM
 
924 posts, read 1,962,755 times
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BadJuju, with all due respect to lovebrentwood and gazania, I think they're being a bit too negative about this. I think that whether it's a good or bad idea for you to do what you're considering depends a lot on your life situation and your personality. If you have a family, especially small children, or other people depending on you to be stable, then no, you probably shouldn't pack up and move somewhere new without a job lined-up. But I would assume that if that was the case you wouldn't have asked the question in the first place.

Your personality really does have a lot to do with it, too. I've actually known a number of people who have done something like what you're describing over the past few years since the economy and the job market have been bad. They either lost their jobs in one place and decided to try to start over somewhere else, or they were fresh college graduates who couldn't land a specific job offer out of college, so they decided to just head somewhere interesting and see what they could find. A couple of those people I know have succeeded in their new towns, and a couple of others have failed. The biggest difference, I think, is that those who have succeeded with it are the ones who have a positive attitude, are willing to take risks, are determined, persistent, and resourceful, and are self-confident and self-motivated. So, I think you ought to take some time to really consider whether or not you fit that description. If not, you should probably stay home until you get a job offer somewhere. If so, it may be worth a shot.

Remember that yes, moving to Raleigh without a job in-place would definitely be a risk. There is a real chance that you could burn through much of your savings and have little to show for it. If you can't accept that level of risk, then you shouldn't make the move. But it would seem to me like if you did give it a try and it didn't work out, it wouldn't be the end of the world (as long as there aren't people dependent upon you). You'd feel bad for a while, shake it off, and go do something else. And if that didn't work out, then you'd repeat the process. The truth is that it's hard to get anywhere in life—or at least it's hard to get anywhere really cool and awesome—without taking risks. That's not to say that you should just run out and do any old thing. And it's not to say that you shouldn't invest some time beforehand to think about it and research it (which seems to be what you're doing now). But the thing is that life is short, and if you see something that you think you want to try, including moving to a new city, you owe it to yourself to at least strongly consider giving it a shot. And I'd bet that if you did try moving to Raleigh or somewhere else, if nothing else you'd wind up with some adventures and some interesting stories to tell.

You said that you want to move to a "large, vibrant city." Have you been to Raleigh? If so, did you consider it to be "large" and "vibrant?" It's all relative, I guess. A lot of people who have lived or spent a lot of time in cities like New York, Chicago, San Francisco, or even Atlanta or Charlotte, would not consider Raleigh to be particularly large or vibrant. But I suppose if you're coming from Johnson City and the Tri-Cities, Raleigh is fairly large and vibrant by comparison. I really like Raleigh, and it's plenty large and vibrant for me, but if largeness and vibrancy are top priorities for you, I might look elsewhere.

I do agree that Raleigh is "on the up-and-up," as you say. I've been here off-and-on for about eleven years now, and I'm really impressed and enthusiastic about the way the city has developed in that time, and I'm truly excited about its potential for the future. As the other posters have said, the recession has certainly been felt here, so unemployment is a lot higher and growth a lot slower than it was a few years ago. But there still are plenty of people here with good jobs, and there are still companies hiring, albeit with a lot more competition for those openings that are available. Still, in the big picture, this area has a lot going for it, and I think moving forward, this is about as good a place to be as anywhere (unless you happen to speak Mandarin and want to move to China).

Best of luck, and have fun with whatever you decide!
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Old 10-08-2011, 10:34 PM
 
Location: Formerly Pleasanton Ca, now in Marietta Ga
8,692 posts, read 6,153,408 times
Reputation: 12771
Quote:
Originally Posted by tompope View Post
BadJuju, with all due respect to lovebrentwood and gazania, I think they're being a bit too negative about this. I think that whether it's a good or bad idea for you to do what you're considering depends a lot on your life situation and your personality. If you have a family, especially small children, or other people depending on you to be stable, then no, you probably shouldn't pack up and move somewhere new without a job lined-up. But I would assume that if that was the case you wouldn't have asked the question in the first place.

Your personality really does have a lot to do with it, too. I've actually known a number of people who have done something like what you're describing over the past few years since the economy and the job market have been bad. They either lost their jobs in one place and decided to try to start over somewhere else, or they were fresh college graduates who couldn't land a specific job offer out of college, so they decided to just head somewhere interesting and see what they could find. A couple of those people I know have succeeded in their new towns, and a couple of others have failed. The biggest difference, I think, is that those who have succeeded with it are the ones who have a positive attitude, are willing to take risks, are determined, persistent, and resourceful, and are self-confident and self-motivated. So, I think you ought to take some time to really consider whether or not you fit that description. If not, you should probably stay home until you get a job offer somewhere. If so, it may be worth a shot.

Remember that yes, moving to Raleigh without a job in-place would definitely be a risk. There is a real chance that you could burn through much of your savings and have little to show for it. If you can't accept that level of risk, then you shouldn't make the move. But it would seem to me like if you did give it a try and it didn't work out, it wouldn't be the end of the world (as long as there aren't people dependent upon you). You'd feel bad for a while, shake it off, and go do something else. And if that didn't work out, then you'd repeat the process. The truth is that it's hard to get anywhere in life—or at least it's hard to get anywhere really cool and awesome—without taking risks. That's not to say that you should just run out and do any old thing. And it's not to say that you shouldn't invest some time beforehand to think about it and research it (which seems to be what you're doing now). But the thing is that life is short, and if you see something that you think you want to try, including moving to a new city, you owe it to yourself to at least strongly consider giving it a shot. And I'd bet that if you did try moving to Raleigh or somewhere else, if nothing else you'd wind up with some adventures and some interesting stories to tell.

You said that you want to move to a "large, vibrant city." Have you been to Raleigh? If so, did you consider it to be "large" and "vibrant?" It's all relative, I guess. A lot of people who have lived or spent a lot of time in cities like New York, Chicago, San Francisco, or even Atlanta or Charlotte, would not consider Raleigh to be particularly large or vibrant. But I suppose if you're coming from Johnson City and the Tri-Cities, Raleigh is fairly large and vibrant by comparison. I really like Raleigh, and it's plenty large and vibrant for me, but if largeness and vibrancy are top priorities for you, I might look elsewhere.

I do agree that Raleigh is "on the up-and-up," as you say. I've been here off-and-on for about eleven years now, and I'm really impressed and enthusiastic about the way the city has developed in that time, and I'm truly excited about its potential for the future. As the other posters have said, the recession has certainly been felt here, so unemployment is a lot higher and growth a lot slower than it was a few years ago. But there still are plenty of people here with good jobs, and there are still companies hiring, albeit with a lot more competition for those openings that are available. Still, in the big picture, this area has a lot going for it, and I think moving forward, this is about as good a place to be as anywhere (unless you happen to speak Mandarin and want to move to China).

Best of luck, and have fun with whatever you decide!
Nice post. I agree that your attitude and desire have a lot to do with what happens to you. Nothing in life is without risk. I plan to be moving to Raleigh and starting up a business with no clientele at all. Still based on my last visit I think commonsense and hard work will allow me to thrive. If it goes bad . . .well there's a lot of places way worse to be poor in.
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Old 10-09-2011, 08:48 AM
 
6,253 posts, read 15,135,265 times
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A positive attitude is required for anything you do.

But there's no magical connection between having a positive attitude and having all your dreams come true, either. There have been a lot of dashed dreams in this economy.

Just do your homework (research), be realistic, and you'll be fine.
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Old 10-09-2011, 12:46 PM
 
Location: On the brink of WWIII
21,093 posts, read 26,464,058 times
Reputation: 7812
At the very least, move to where there is the GREATEST likelihood of being employed with an Associate of Applied Science in Electromechanical Technology.


Quote:
Originally Posted by BadJuju View Post
That doesn't make sense. There are very few places that are going to hire a person without them living near them. It just doesn't happen. And I do not want to remain where I am at. The point of this post is that I am trying to move to places that are experiencing a lot of growth so finding a job in the field I am in won't be so difficult.
How did you arrive at the conclusion Raleigh has either of these going for it today? Do not belive everything Forbes prints. Get a magic jack and have a Raleigh exchange for employers to call...schedule interviews on the same day or back-to-back IF you can.
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Old 10-09-2011, 01:17 PM
 
273 posts, read 581,583 times
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Your college advisers should have told you that finding a job in your field means you find the job, and move where the company is. You seldom get to pick a city to live in with a specialty career.

Moving here without a job with your expectations I would think is ill-advised...... Good luck with whatever happens!
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