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Old 01-27-2013, 09:48 PM
 
924 posts, read 2,104,474 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spruce Goose View Post
Wow, thanks so much for the extensive descriptions, tompope! You've already helped so much ... but I'll go ahead and answer your questions in case you or anyone else has thoughts to add.

We are looking at approximately the 300K (or lower) price range. We would prefer to buy sooner rather than later. We don't need a very large home but want at least 3 bedrooms and 2 full baths. We would likely prefer a single-family home, although we might consider a townhome if we can't find a suitable single-family home. We are definitely OK with urban grit (I would say it is desirable, to a point), although being reasonably close to parks/nature would be a big plus. We are white and OK with a lot of ethnic diversity.
I don't know if you're still following this thread, Spruce Goose, but regardless, you probably already know that your desired combination of <$300K and at least 3 bedrooms and 2 full bathrooms is not ideal in the kinds of areas you're looking at, but it should be manageable. Many of the houses in the most walkable and desirable parts of inner Raleigh and Durham are either smaller or more expensive than that (or in some cases actually both), but there are plenty of exceptions, especially in the current real estate market. In Raleigh, that size/price combination may be quite difficult to find in some of the highest-demand areas, like Cameron Park, Oakwood, and some of the neighborhoods around Five Points, but if you're able to be patient and flexible, you never know. I've certainly seen houses listed at that size and price regularly in Oberlin Village, Woodcrest, some of the neighborhoods discussed just east of downtown, and elsewhere. At least a couple of times in the last few months I've even seen 3-bed, 2-bath houses in Boylan Heights listed at around $300,000, although I never actually saw any of those houses themselves, and don't know anything about their condition or features. I'm less familiar with the specifics of the real estate market in Durham, but I believe the situation is similar, although there's a bit more total housing stock available there in the old parts of town, as paytonc pointed out, so that's got to help. peperoberto makes good points about which areas may be your best bets there. I'm still inclined to think that Morehead Hill may be a particularly good fit for someone in your situation; I guess I'm still skeptical about how realistic it is to find that size and price in Trinity Park, but peperoberto would know better than I would, so maybe so.

As far as "urban grit" and access to parks/nature, even the most urban and gritty parts of the Triangle really aren't all that urban or gritty compared to lots of other places around the country, which is kind of both good and bad, in a way. So those of us who appreciate and value a more-or-less urban vibe with a certain amount of grit have to make a bit of an effort to seek it out around here, but with a reasonably open mind I think several parts of both Raleigh and Durham can be reasonably satisfying. And one of the attributes of this area that's unquestionably positive is that literally everywhere is fairly accessible to parks and more-or-less natural green spaces. There are nice parks in virtually every corner of Raleigh, Durham, and other towns in the area, a decent and growing network of greenways, and numerous other publicly available unbuilt places of various kinds. Of course the nature of the nature around here is a little different from some parts of the country. I've known people who came here from cities in the western United States and complained that the natural areas in the North Carolina Piedmont were too small and boring, having been accustomed to having big, grand, spectacular natural scenery nearby, with majestic mountains, forests, rivers, etc. Since you're coming from Seattle, I could see that being an issue. But it is what it is, and if an abundance of smallish pockets of second-growth mixed pines and hardwoods on gently rolling hills appeals to you (it does to me), you'll be very happy here.

One other quick question about your overall housing search: what's your approximate timeframe? You said that you're planning to move to the area "in the next few months," but will you have a chance to visit and scout extensively beforehand, or will you have to move quickly once you arrive? Not that it matters, necessarily, but I was just trying to get a general idea of how patient and picky you'll be able to be.

Last edited by tompope; 01-27-2013 at 10:00 PM..
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Old 03-14-2013, 11:23 AM
 
2 posts, read 3,093 times
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FWIW, I live in Cleveland-Holloway and commute to RTP. When I drove it took 20 min max and the commute was much better than Raleigh to Durham. Now I take the bus from Downtown. It makes my commute a little longer (25min bus ride, 10 min walk), but I hate driving and now I get to read and drink my coffee every morning.

Our neighborhood has changed significantly since I moved in in 2008. We bought our home for $30K, and a home right next to ours and similarly sized just sold for $230K cash). Never had a problem with the 'crime' some people might talk about. Durham has a bad rep from many years ago that doesn't fit anymore. Crime is at a 23 year low.

The Durham News | Durham crime at 23-year low
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Old 03-14-2013, 08:56 PM
 
924 posts, read 2,104,474 times
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Originally Posted by bitterbuffalo View Post
FWIW, I live in Cleveland-Holloway and commute to RTP. When I drove it took 20 min max and the commute was much better than Raleigh to Durham. Now I take the bus from Downtown. It makes my commute a little longer (25min bus ride, 10 min walk), but I hate driving and now I get to read and drink my coffee every morning.

Our neighborhood has changed significantly since I moved in in 2008. We bought our home for $30K, and a home right next to ours and similarly sized just sold for $230K cash). Never had a problem with the 'crime' some people might talk about. Durham has a bad rep from many years ago that doesn't fit anymore. Crime is at a 23 year low.

The Durham News | Durham crime at 23-year low
Yeah, I agree. I like Cleveland-Holloway a lot, too. If my job situation made it practical for me to live in Durham, Cleveland-Holloway would be high on my list of places to live, and particularly to buy a house. Do you find that there's enough for you to walk to there? I've never lived in Cleveland-Holloway, but it seems like one of those places that is pretty "walkable" in the sense that it has good conditions for walking, like nice sidewalks, moderate speed limits, human-scale architecture and layout, etc., but may have a lack of appealing and worthwhile destinations to walk to. To some extent, that pattern is true in a lot of the older, inner parts of most of the towns in the Triangle, and in other areas as well, where there are a lot of places that are an excellent place to take a walk, but not necessarily to walk to anything in particular. But it seems to me from the outside like that might be more true of Cleveland-Holloway than in other neighborhoods, but you would know better about that than me. And even if it is true, it's not the end of the world, and I still think it's reasonable to call it a "walkable neighborhood," at least by Triangle-area standards.

Incidentally, just out of curiosity, what's with the user name "bitterbuffalo"? Are you in fact bitter about something? Are you from Buffalo? Are you bitter about Buffalo? Or is it something totally different? None of my business, but I was just wondering.
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Old 03-28-2013, 09:26 AM
 
2 posts, read 3,093 times
Reputation: 13
Default C-H, et al.

@Tom Pope, I'm about a 5 minute walk from Dos Perros, Bull City Beer & Burger, Monuts Donuts, etc. I'm also a five minute walk from Rock, Paper, Scissors (where I get my hair cut). I'm about a 10 minute walk from Old Five Points (Toro, Whiskey, Etc). And The Fed and Brightleaf are only 20 to 25 minutes walking, when the weather's nice we do this often. The Farmer's Market, Fullsteam, and the YMCA are about 10 minutes away as well. And with new bars/restaurants opening all the time it's always getting easier to walk places. Biking is great in this area too, which makes everything closer. I have only owned a car for 1 year of my 5 years living here (I just got rid of it again).

And "Bitter Buffalo" is the name of a Modest Mouse song, and I am from Buffalo. I exaggerate when I say I'm bitter, but I miss the black humor of my hometown. Thanks for asking.
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Old 11-28-2017, 05:18 PM
 
Location: Pinehurst ,N. C.
213 posts, read 211,818 times
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Glad I found this post as it has helped me with areas that have character and older. Don't want new development tract house. Moving from southern pines/ Pinehurst to be near kids and grandkids
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Old 11-29-2017, 05:14 AM
 
Location: Triangle Area, NC
100 posts, read 110,746 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dimitri1000 View Post
When committing to a commute I would also consider where you have to park on campus. Will you have to drive, park in a remote lot, then take a bus or shuttle to your building? That last step could add 10-15 minutes to your commute and turn 30-45 minutes into more like an hour.

Excellent advice to anyone moving here! This area definitely suffers from suburban sprawl. Plan on driving *everywhere.*
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